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2017 National Championships discussion

I don't know if there already is a thread about Nationals 2017. Couldn't find one so I made a new thread.

Polanc won the Slovenian TT national title. The opposition was almost non existent. There was no other rider from WT or Pro Conti teams. But more than his win, the surprising thing was his time. He stopped the clock in 50:03 and that's 48 seconds faster than Roglic last year on the same 44km flat course. The wind must have been a factor but with his 52.7km/h average speed it's safe to say that was a pretty impressive ride. A rider to keep an eye on for future GT success.
 
Slovenian ITT has been held already? Pretty early isn't it? Normally all (European) championships are held in the week leading up to the Tour, with several races going on at the same time because - obviously - there's no schedule conflict between what races which riders should ride.

However, I think there might be a thread somewhere. After all, several (non-European) countries have already held their national championships.
 
Nico Roche is the reigning TT and Road Champion of Ireland and has been confirmed as racing the Nationals this year.

TT will be between Roche, Ryan Mullen and Dunbar.

Road, Roche will be favourite, but depending on who makes the break of the day there are a slew of potential winners, Roche, Damien Shaw, Eddie Dunbar and Sam Bennett to name a few.
 
Re:

RedheadDane said:
Slovenian ITT has been held already? Pretty early isn't it? Normally all (European) championships are held in the week leading up to the Tour, with several races going on at the same time because - obviously - there's no schedule conflict between what races which riders should ride.

However, I think there might be a thread somewhere. After all, several (non-European) countries have already held their national championships.
Yes. Slovenian ITT NC it's been held earlier in the last couple of years. It's been part of an amateur race called Maraton Franja which is also part of UCI Gran Fondo World Series and is usually held in the first half of June. It's a very bad idea if you ask me, because the field is usually extremely poor. In that period of time there are usually important races going on around Europe (Suisse, Dauphine among others), so the best Slovenian riders can't always compete in the event because they are elsewhere riding with their teams. That's why this year there were only 3 riders competing in the elite category :rolleyes: . A joke of a competition.
 
Interesting route in Spain this year, with the nationals around Soria.

contrarreloj-profesional.-Campeonato-Ciclismo-en-Carretera-en-Soria.jpg

Perfil-Campeonato-de-Ciclismo-en-Carretera-Soria-2017.jpg


It opens up with three not massive but decently sizable climbs, most notably the Puerto de Oncala before a bumpy circuit around the city of Soria, likely with the same slightly punchy uphill finish as used in the 2004 Vuelta (although the PRC guys have a much better alternative, mind).

The Portuguese nationals should also be pretty tough, with a hilly course around Gondomar featuring three notable climbs. The first, on Rua Lameiro Pinheiro, is just 500m long but is just over 10% in gradient, close to the start of the circuit, then there's a bit of a plateau and a descent before 2,2km at 5,2%, 7km from the line, then a gradual descent and rolling route around town before the final 1,2km averages 6,4% (last 500m over 8%) which should help the puncheurs. This looks like a good circuit, although perhaps having the finish at the top of the climb may be a factor.

championnat_de_france__stomer_2017.jpeg


The French national championships are up in Normandie, in full Quatre Jours de Dunkerque territory, which promises to provide some entertainment as a result - possibility of wind, narrow roads, a small climb of 1,3km @ 6,5% and a péloton split between the goals of durable fastmen (Coquard, Bouhanni, Démare) and versatile attackers. Not one for the likes of Bardet and Pinot, mind. The picture I've posted there is from the women's championships, but the circuit is the same for the men, so the profile remains accurate. Here's a more detailed look at the route - notably, it isn't very technical which will favour the sprinters.

The German national championships are in Chemnitz, which has a long tradition of cycling, dating back to when it was formerly Karl-Marx-Stadt and held the first Eastern Bloc World Championships. Back then (in 1960) they used the streets of the extended motor racing circuit at the Sachsenring, which has been reprofiled and rebuilt rendering it not possible at this point (although in the Race Design Thread I did propose something close). It was famous as the day Täve Schur gave up his ambitions of a third straight win to allow a teammate to take the rainbow stripes, and became a demi-God in the DDR. Here, however, there's a 19km circuit which begins and ends in the city (back then it was fairly common to see racing circuits used in the vicinity - just look at the Lasarte-Oria course used for the San Sebastián Worlds - about as flat a circuit as was humanly possible in País Vasco), with only the one real ascent to bear in mind, this being 2,1km at just under 5% and almost exactly halfway through the circuit. However, while the 9km descent is very shallow, it runs almost all the way to the line and though it has few real sharp corners, there are few long straights so it would be possible to get out of the sight of the péloton here - the sprinters may well still prevail but they'll have to work hard for it.

The Britons are going for something which combines a few points I've brought up here - the combination of an old racing circuit with the Spanish "a few climbs, then the bumpy circuit" route - they're going to the Isle of Man, home of course of Mark Cavendish and Peter Kennaugh. It's a difficult course as a result, with the men doing 2 laps of the fabled Isle of Man TT course before 10 laps of an urban circuit, with the women doing 1 lap of the long hilly route and then 6 laps of the urban circuit. Certainly more likely to be one for the likes of Lizzie than the Barnes sisters, but the latter are clearly on much better form at present. That said, the small climbs on the short circuit are within their remit if The Women's Tour is anything to go by, so they may need to be distanced on The Mountain first. And among the men, hope for a home win must surely rest with Kennaugh, as this is unlikely to be inside Cav's remit. I couldn't find a profile so I drew it on Cronoescalada.

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The Belgian national championships are, because there is no kind and loving God, on the outskirts of Antwerp, that god-forsaken city that is the ruiner of all things good on two wheels. On the plus side, however, as they're looping around to the southwest around the areas of Hoboken and Wilrijk, the course may be absolutely pan-flat, but the organizers have had the opportunity to include two kasseistroken in the course, which also has eleven thousand corners and pieces of street furniture, because let's face it, it wouldn't be racing in Belgium without that.

9475496.jpeg


It doesn't look like the cobbles will be especially challenging, being mostly fairly well-maintained and aligned city cobbles, but it's still a nice additional wildcard of a challenge on a course where technical skills will likely be the most selective factor in making breaks rather than anything else. The Belgian nationals are usually very well-raced with so many Classics men on hand, though, so they'll probably be able to make something good out of this.

The Dutch are, well, they're trying to make things selective. Their championships are in 's-Heerenberg, in the east of the country, and not far from Nijmegen, one of the only places outside of Limburg where a genuine natural hill can be found for racing on in the Netherlands. 's-Heerenberg allows for a hill of sorts, although only at the bottom are the gradients especially selective, it does at least give a pretty solid platform for attacking from. The main climb is called Peeskesweg and is 1,1km @ 4,9% with a max of 8%. This isn't too bad at all by Dutch standards of hills, and with the run-in then resulting in some narrow twisty routes around Stokken it could be more selective than you might anticipate.

route.jpg


The Russian championships this year do not court the same controversy as last year's in Sevastopol'; this year they are in Voronezh, with a course that undulates in and out of the banks of the river of the same name. No detailed parcours that I can find, but it looks like it will be a tricky circuit with at least a couple of short climbs and technical corners, although a wide open start/finish.

The Italians have gone for an approach similar to the Brits and the Spaniards, with a route with some obstacles followed by a circuit. Only there's a twist: here the circuit is harder than the initial route.

4a7cd042-94e0-47cd-8217-c595f53c54dc-800x457-800x457.jpg


Bouncing around the Piemontese countryside just south of the Valle d'Aosta, this will be a tough and selective national championships with a nice difficult climb mid-circuit. Can't find a profile for this exact side of the multi-faced Salita della Serra (it's a ridge which lies between Ivrea and Biella with at least 3 passes) but the official communication says it's 3,4km @ 7,0% with a maximum of 13% - plenty enough to be selective in a national championship like this. Certainly interesting to see if Cecchini can triple up; she won at Supergà a couple of years ago but several times up a climb like this could leave her vulnerable to the likes of Elisa; for the men, it seems this is one for the Nibalis of the world, but also perhaps Ulissi, Rosa, Felline and co. can be key players, as opposed to the likes of Nizzolo and Viviani who will likely not be contending.

affoltern-sm-strecke12-6.jpg


The Swiss championships above are on a 30km loop beginning before several laps of the 12,6km circuit shown there. The first 2,5km are at around 7% before a very gradual descent back into the town makes up the remainder of the course. The women will be doing a shorter circuit of 7,8km which includes the first 3/4 of the climb then a short plateau to rejoin the men's course. This actually means the punchy/climby riders will be better served in the women's race than the men's.
 
Re:

Yeah, very good post, very informative and helpful - I was actually looking for such a summary, so great that I bumped into one :D .

Only problem is:
Libertine Seguros said:
The French national championships are up in Normandie, in full Quatre Jours de Dunkerque territory...
Saint-Omer and Dunkerque aren't in Normandy :)
 
Re: Re:

johnymax said:
RedheadDane said:
Slovenian ITT has been held already? Pretty early isn't it? Normally all (European) championships are held in the week leading up to the Tour, with several races going on at the same time because - obviously - there's no schedule conflict between what races which riders should ride.

However, I think there might be a thread somewhere. After all, several (non-European) countries have already held their national championships.
Yes. Slovenian ITT NC it's been held earlier in the last couple of years. It's been part of an amateur race called Maraton Franja which is also part of UCI Gran Fondo World Series and is usually held in the first half of June. It's a very bad idea if you ask me, because the field is usually extremely poor. In that period of time there are usually important races going on around Europe (Suisse, Dauphine among others), so the best Slovenian riders can't always compete in the event because they are elsewhere riding with their teams. That's why this year there were only 3 riders competing in the elite category :rolleyes: . A joke of a competition.

Okay, that is ridiculous. Surely the point of an Elite ITT NC is to have the elite be there... Sorry, Slovenian Cycling Federation, but you can't expect the big riders to forgo some rather big races on the World Tour...
 
Re: Re:

mikii4567 said:
Yeah, very good post, very informative and helpful - I was actually looking for such a summary, so great that I bumped into one :D .

Only problem is:
Libertine Seguros said:
The French national championships are up in Normandie, in full Quatre Jours de Dunkerque territory...
Saint-Omer and Dunkerque aren't in Normandy :)
Haha, lol, yes, they're in Nord-Pas-de-Calais... I always tend to think of more or less all of France's north coast from the Cotentin Peninsula onwards as being Normandy, hence the error.

Couple more for you.

The Polish championships are based around Gdynia, along the Baltic coast, although little of the course is within the Tricity. Instead they're heading inland into the scenic Kashubian countryside, with a number of small rolling hills around a very long loop. There's an "out and back" element to it along the lines of the London or Rio Olympics, although the circuit they head out to is extremely long. The women go out to the circuit, do one lap of the 84km loop and then head back to the city for a total of 126km; the Espoirs do one truncated, less difficult lap of 64km before the full lap of 84km and then the run-in back to the city for a total of 190km, while the Elite men do two laps of the 84km loop, and then have 4 laps of an 11km circuit although sadly this circuit is pan flat and there's no use of Witomino or Redłowo hills.

Course is here.

The Norwegian championships are in Stjørdal, near Trondheim (I'm kind of surprised, I thought they'd do what the Spanish did in 2014 and hold the Nationals on the World Championships course to test it), and look quite tricky. The parcours is here and looks to be quite significant in terms of obstacles, with 1,9km @ 6,5% near the start of the circuit and around 2,5km @ 5% near the end. Certainly more for Boasson Hagen than Kristoff, I think, out of their biggest stars.

The Danes are going to be taking on a variety of complex courses around Grindsted, which is not far from Vejle but sadly is not as geographically interesting as cycling fans' favourite Danish town. It is going to be absolutely pan-flat, however there are a lot of technical corners and tricky narrow roads that are almost totally exposed throughout the circuit, so it's going to be a tough rouleur's course for sure.
 
Re: Re:

Libertine Seguros said:
mikii4567 said:
Yeah, very good post, very informative and helpful - I was actually looking for such a summary, so great that I bumped into one :D .

Only problem is:
Libertine Seguros said:
The French national championships are up in Normandie, in full Quatre Jours de Dunkerque territory...
Saint-Omer and Dunkerque aren't in Normandy :)
Haha, lol, yes, they're in Nord-Pas-de-Calais... I always tend to think of more or less all of France's north coast from the Cotentin Peninsula onwards as being Normandy, hence the error.

Well, technically they're not in Nord-Pas-de-Calais either, since last year there has been a reorganisation of the French regions. It's Hauts-de-France now. :D ;)
 
Does anybody know why the British Cycling Federation does not use the Isle of Man TT for the ITT? It's 60 kilometers and Peter Kennaugh holds the record of 83 minutes. That would be great, also for a Grand Tour. :D

170608101831553033.png


That's the final circuit around Douglas. The big selection has to be made on the first two laps, I guess.


Here we have Austria...

170608095242384515.png


5 laps of 32k and then 2 laps of 7,5k to close it.


And this is the Netherlands. 231 km total...

170608112524102998.png
 
Does anybody know why the British Cycling Federation does not use the Isle of Man TT for the ITT? It's 60 kilometers and Peter Kennaugh holds the record of 83 minutes. That would be great, also for a Grand Tour. :D

They don't want any deaths? *I was thinking of putting a laughing smiley here but then I tought It would be inappropiate considering the three lethal accidents this year, so I'm just gonna use this: :Question: *
 
Bit of a silly question:
Are there any rules regarding the nationality of DSes? Do they have to be from the country in question?
Mainly asking because I sorta realised that there are several Danish riders with Danish DSes, but it would make sense if teams like Sunweb, Trek, and Aqua Blue decided that those DSes could be better used elsewhere, than with guys flying solo.
 
Re:

Inquitus said:
Nico Roche is the reigning TT and Road Champion of Ireland and has been confirmed as racing the Nationals this year.

TT will be between Roche, Ryan Mullen and Dunbar.

Road, Roche will be favourite, but depending on who makes the break of the day there are a slew of potential winners, Roche, Damien Shaw, Eddie Dunbar and Sam Bennett to name a few.
Mullen did a decent TT in the Tour de Suisse the other day
 
Re: Re:

bob.a.feet said:
Inquitus said:
Nico Roche is the reigning TT and Road Champion of Ireland and has been confirmed as racing the Nationals this year.

TT will be between Roche, Ryan Mullen and Dunbar.

Road, Roche will be favourite, but depending on who makes the break of the day there are a slew of potential winners, Roche, Damien Shaw, Eddie Dunbar and Sam Bennett to name a few.
Mullen did a decent TT in the Tour de Suisse the other day

Yes but then he did a rather poor second TT. Mullen should be the favourite, but he might not have the form while Roche should be in Tour condition.
 
Irish Website - http://www.roadchamps.irish
Irish Road Book - http://www.roadchamps.irish/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/Nationals-Booklet-June-Final.pdf
Irish Road Route - http://www.mapmyride.com/routes/view/1467051187 or https://www.strava.com/routes/9251055

Roche, Mullen and Dunbar are confirmed, Dan Martin is defo not riding, Brammeier ,Conor Dunne and Michael O'Loughlin signed up as well, no work on Bennett.

Should be a cracker especially as the fine weather is meant to stay for the weekend!

SN6caJG.png
 
Danish RR is approximtely 225 km: 10 laps of 18.5 km and 6 smaller laps of 6.5 km. The course is flat but somewhat longer than what is usually seen at the Danish championship road races. The wind will probbly not matter much as the course is in the middle of Jutland and not quite at the West coast.

Start list:
http://dmcykling2017.dk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/DM-Liniel%C3%B8b-Herre-Elite.pdf

No Bak or Fuglsang but most of the pros will apparently be there. It will be pretty open (once again!).

The women's start list is pretty interesting with Cecilie Uttrup Ludwig and Amalie Dideriksen as the biggest stars, and others like Julie Leth, Camilla Pedersen, and veteran Trine Schmidt. Last year's champion Emma Norsgaard is also listed but not given a start number? I'm not sure how I should interpret that but I hope she's riding too. It's interesting that many of the seemingly biggest favourites will be without or almost without teammates. Amalie will be tough to beat on this course though.
 
Jun 30, 2014
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The profile of the La Serra climb of the Italian RR:
Dettagli-salita-La-Serra-Gran-Piemonte-2017.jpg

Climbing this one four times, 245km of racing and the heat, probably 33-34°C, should make the race pretty hard.
 
Re:

RedheadDane said:
Bit of a silly question:
Are there any rules regarding the nationality of DSes? Do they have to be from the country in question?
Mainly asking because I sorta realised that there are several Danish riders with Danish DSes, but it would make sense if teams like Sunweb, Trek, and Aqua Blue decided that those DSes could be better used elsewhere, than with guys flying solo.
No, the sport directors don't have to be from the country in question.
Just like in any other sport.
 
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The main favourites have already been mentioned, Brambilla and Visconti also have a decent shoot and I wouldn't underestimate Androni, they've got a strong team around Cattaneo. Nippo also has many riders and maybe Santaromita or Cunego can turn back the clock and finish in the top 5 and Conti was really strong at the Giro and the TdS, he could be even stronger than Ulissi.
The dark horse is Celano.