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already want a new bike...

Aug 14, 2009
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Let's be honest - I'm just being greedy and trying to justify my actions.

Been cycling on and off for about 5 years now - for the past 6-7 months very consistently riding. During that time, I've been riding a hand-me-down Schwinn, and finally took a dive about 4 months ago and got myself a beautiful steel Colnago Master frame with Campagnolo components.

After paying the closest attention I ever have to the TdF and seeing all the great high-tech bikes (Treks, Cervelos, Wiliers, etc...), I am kind of regretting getting the classic steel frame and want to invest a bit of cash into a Carbon Frame.

Is it that much of an upgrade from my current set up to, let's say, a carbon Cannondale frame?
 
Mar 19, 2009
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www.ridemagnetic.com
Truth be told, you're the 1st person I've ever heard have regrets about getting a Master. I've had mine for 11 years this season and wouldn't trade it for anything. Since then I've added carbon to the stable the last couple years, and nothing can touch the ride quality of a Master. IMHO the last of the truly great steel race bikes. Keep it!
Durand_recon%20copy.jpg

Vintage me, on the Master.
 
Aug 14, 2009
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RDV4ROUBAIX said:
Truth be told, you're the 1st person I've ever heard have regrets about getting a Master. I've had mine for 11 years this season and wouldn't trade it for anything. Since then I've added carbon to the stable the last couple years, and nothing can touch the ride quality of a Master. IMHO the last of the truly great steel race bikes. Keep it!

Don't get me wrong - I love it...but I'm thinking of the advantages of keeping with the times.

Why do you have two bikes? Any great advantages? Was it worth the investment? (hoping you say yes)
 
Mar 18, 2009
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RDV4ROUBAIX said:
Truth be told, you're the 1st person I've ever heard have regrets about getting a Master. I've had mine for 11 years this season and wouldn't trade it for anything. Since then I've added carbon to the stable the last couple years, and nothing can touch the ride quality of a Master. IMHO the last of the truly great steel race bikes. Keep it!
Durand_recon%20copy.jpg

Vintage me, on the Master.

+1...can't beat it!
 
Mar 19, 2009
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ViaPagliano said:
Why do you have two bikes? Any great advantages? Was it worth the investment? (hoping you say yes)

LOL-OMG! :D I can't remember last time I only had 2 bikes. The stable is at 8 now. Honestly, I ride steel the majority of the time, probably 80%. The carbon is strictly reserved for racing, and aggressive training rides, where city sign sprints carry more respect sometimes than winning an actual race. I'm heavier, almost 180lbs, so I need all the weight advantage I can get with the carbon, especially when the road goes up.
 
Mar 10, 2009
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Do you race, VP? In my opinion, if you are riding for enjoyment then I would stick with what you have. From experience, I would say that bike envy is the least of your worries. I would think that 90% of people that you pass on the road would swap their bike for yours! Enjoy it while you can!
 
Mar 18, 2009
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I have recently struggled with the same decision, but from a reverse perspective. I have a custom titanium Lynskey bike (OK, not steel but not carbon either) and recently purchased a Cervelo R3 after a good test ride. After buying the R3, I cannot appreciate any differences between the two bikes in the hills, on the flats, in hammer fests, or during intervals. The Lynskey is slightly more comfortable and I actually chose the Lynskey over the R3 for the a tour which involved a lot of climbing. The Cervelo is a great bike, but not that different to my Lynskey to warrant buying it in the first place IMO. As others have eluded to, it may make a difference if you race. If you don't then I would stick with your Colnago and perhaps invest the money you intended for a new carbon bike into a sweet wheelset or component upgrade.
 
Aug 14, 2009
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LugHugger said:
Do you race, VP? In my opinion, if you are riding for enjoyment then I would stick with what you have. From experience, I would say that bike envy is the least of your worries. I would think that 90% of people that you pass on the road would swap their bike for yours! Enjoy it while you can!

No - not much of a racer. I mostly ride to stay fit - but I still like to try and go fast. But who knows? Next step for me might be to compete in charity events.

And you're right, I should be thankful for what I have. But everytime I see that guy with the sharp looking Cervelo...

RDV4ROUBAIX said:
When comparing carbon vs. steel, keep in mind that we're only talking about 3 pounds give or take. Here's an interesting article by Bill McGann of Torelli fame.

http://www.torelli.com/tech/weight.shtml

Thank you for this link!
 
Aug 14, 2009
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elapid said:
I have recently struggled with the same decision, but from a reverse perspective. I have a custom titanium Lynskey bike (OK, not steel but not carbon either) and recently purchased a Cervelo R3 after a good test ride. After buying the R3, I cannot appreciate any differences between the two bikes in the hills, on the flats, in hammer fests, or during intervals. The Lynskey is slightly more comfortable and I actually chose the Lynskey over the R3 for the a tour which involved a lot of climbing. The Cervelo is a great bike, but not that different to my Lynskey to warrant buying it in the first place IMO. As others have eluded to, it may make a difference if you race. If you don't then I would stick with your Colnago and perhaps invest the money you intended for a new carbon bike into a sweet wheelset or component upgrade.

This is what my inner conscience wanted me to hear. :D

Thanks for the feedback - but I say enjoy the luxuries of having two bikes! The R3 looks amazing.
 
Jun 9, 2009
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Steel is Real!

Both of my road bikes are steel, and I love the ride quality. Carbon may be faster, but the ride quality isn't very lively.

It would be a good idea to see if a local shop has a demo program that would allow you to take a bike for a long ride. The only was to really decide if you want a new bike is to see how happy you are on one after a few hours.

Test all of the options.
 
Jun 18, 2009
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ViaPagliano said:
Let's be honest - I'm just being greedy and trying to justify my actions.

Been cycling on and off for about 5 years now - for the past 6-7 months very consistently riding. During that time, I've been riding a hand-me-down Schwinn, and finally took a dive about 4 months ago and got myself a beautiful steel Colnago Master frame with Campagnolo components.

After paying the closest attention I ever have to the TdF and seeing all the great high-tech bikes (Treks, Cervelos, Wiliers, etc...), I am kind of regretting getting the classic steel frame and want to invest a bit of cash into a Carbon Frame.

Is it that much of an upgrade from my current set up to, let's say, a carbon Cannondale frame?

Get what you want to ride. I can think of many worse things to spend money on than bicycles.

I think upgrading what you have or getting something new helps keep your interest in riding alive too.
 
Jul 27, 2009
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Far be it from me to tell anyone how to spend their discretionary income, but I'd like to offer some food for thought.

For the same money you'll spend on fitting up a high-end carbon frame with high-end componentry, you could almost certainly take your Conalgo to Europe for a couple of weeks and ride some of the famous mountain passes of the Tour, Giro, or Vuelta.
 
Aug 16, 2009
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I'm back up to 5 bikes, but only two that I ride regularly and only one of them purchased in the last 5 years. (got 3 in storage in another state). That said, I'm always looking at new bikes - just to kick the tires. I don't have Carbon (2 Alu and 3 steel) and I'm sure my next bike someday will be C, or whatever ceramic or other material replaces it, but my next spend will be a re-build of a 1974 Raleigh Steel road frame that has been in storage for several years.
It doesn't hurt to look, but don't let your current ride see you doing it.
 
go ahead and get the cervelo. i have 3 steel bikes and they are all great, but so is the cervelo. bike lust is ok if you know your limits, and usually that is money. that colnago is just fine if you only have one. great pedigree. a lot of cool bikes out there. the lightspeed ghisallo is a favorite of mine.:cool:
 
Mar 11, 2009
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Buying a higher-end wheelset will make a bigger difference to you than a new frame. So why not save up for some deep-dish HED, Mavic, or Zipp wheels?
 
Mar 10, 2009
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Bikes, bikes, bikes!!!!

ViaPagliano said:
Let's be honest - I'm just being greedy and trying to justify my actions.

Been cycling on and off for about 5 years now - for the past 6-7 months very consistently riding. During that time, I've been riding a hand-me-down Schwinn, and finally took a dive about 4 months ago and got myself a beautiful steel Colnago Master frame with Campagnolo components.

After paying the closest attention I ever have to the TdF and seeing all the great high-tech bikes (Treks, Cervelos, Wiliers, etc...), I am kind of regretting getting the classic steel frame and want to invest a bit of cash into a Carbon Frame.

Is it that much of an upgrade from my current set up to, let's say, a carbon Cannondale frame?

Go ahead, pull the trigger!:D Do yourself and your **** a favor and get BMC Pro Machine. I only have 5 bikes....Haven't decided if I only need 2 more for the rest of the week or 26 for the rest of the month.
 
Jun 16, 2009
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nightfend said:
Buying a higher-end wheelset will make a bigger difference to you than a new frame. So why not save up for some deep-dish HED, Mavic, or Zipp wheels?

I agree save up for some wheels but instead of store bought try some nice box rims handbuilt by a local craftsman then slap on some high end tubulars and feel the difference
:D
 
Mar 13, 2009
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It doesnt sound like you race or ride big gradients so the master seems perfectly suitable for the riding you do. Carbon only comes into play if you're a weight weenie and need the benefits of the 11 speed gruppo and/or compact chainset.

In saying that it's always good to have 2 bikes for emergencies as 1 is good as the summer/racing bike and the 2nd as the wet weather winter hack.
 

flicker

BANNED
Aug 17, 2009
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new bike

As FLandis and his son Greg LeMond have said its not the bike.

If Anquentiel was alive or if you rode with Merckx or S.Kelly{not R. Kelly}
I'd drop a hundred quid you'd be keeping up no matter how light nor what Marque bike you rode.

The question is geometry and fit assuming the stiffness and handling suit you.

Now go out and support the cycling industry!