Armstrong wins because he trains harder/smarter . . . not doping

Jun 26, 2009
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A doper dopes because he is too weak or lazy to train and do what it takes to win without doping. Kohl and Jascke are worthless slugs. Fact of the matter is if you train at altitude for extended periods of time you can naturally alter your red blood cell count and gain a competitive advantage in high cardio/VO2 max athletic events as a result.

Those to lazy to spend the month of June at 8000 to 12000 feet training for 5-6 hours a day . . . dope. Those dedicated and tough enough to handle such training suck it up, do it, and have the physical ability to win without doping . . . a la Lance Armstrong. Its really very simple. Armstrong doesn't dope because he trains harder and smarter than anyone else and won 7 TDFs as a result. The lazy slugs who can't take such a regime cheat and dope in an effort to compete with the likes of Armstrong.
 
May 18, 2009
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must warn you byu123, you are about to get hammered by the lance haters.
i don't think it is work ethic (though this certainly comes in to it), but mainly due to genetic superiority
 
Mar 10, 2009
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byu123 said:
Those to lazy to spend the month of June at 8000 to 12000 feet training for 5-6 hours a day . . . dope.
I've lived above 5280 for the past thirty years, sometimes in Breckenridge (9600ft) sometimes in Durango (6500ft) sometimes in the Vail Valley (8200ft). What you gain in lung capacity, you lose in strength. While I could drop most of my friends who visited from lower elevations, I was not necessarily faster, and certainly not stronger, when I rode with them at there home elevations.

And my high altitude training certainly does not help me when I go surfing...:D
 
Jun 26, 2009
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BroDeal said:
BYU already got schooled
"If the naive student derives some glee from the vain imagination that he actually taught the scholar some tid bit of wisdom . . . so be it. Whose to dither over a moment of delusional mirth for an otherwise small intellect . . . ."

Hope you enjoyed it BroDeal . . . "your moment of mirth."
 
byu123 said:
"If the naive student derives some glee from the vain imagination that he actually taught the scholar some tid bit of wisdom . . . so be it. Whose to dither over a moment of delusional mirth for an otherwise small intellect . . . ."

Hope you enjoyed it BroDeal . . . "your moment of mirth."
When you come up with a rational argument to refute the huge amounts of evidence that Armstrong doped then we will take you seriously. All I heard was, "I'm not a cyclist. I don't know anything about cycling, but I am an FBI agent and under questioning all these witnesses might not say the same thing." Of course the flip side of the coin, that under questioning people in the inner circle who deny doping would admit it, was never expressed.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
byu123 said:
"If the naive student derives some glee from the vain imagination that he actually taught the scholar some tid bit of wisdom . . . so be it. Whose to dither over a moment of delusional mirth for an otherwise small intellect . . . ."

Hope you enjoyed it BroDeal . . . "your moment of mirth."
No, you got schooled badly. Admit it and move on.

We can revisit the legal misunderstandings you wrote about if you wish, but really, whats the point? We are friends now.

Oh yea, just got back from Sacramento/Nevada City/Grass Valley/San Francisco. You live in a beautiful state.
 
Jun 26, 2009
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Thoughtforfood said:
schooled badly . . . legal misunderstandings

Yes. I'm so grateful to "Thoughtforfood" and "BroDeal." Last night I realized I learned nothing about the law after graduating with honors from a top 20 law school, clerking for a federal judge, practicing law for 4 years, passing two bar exams, and preparing cases for prosecution in federal court for the last 10 years. But I had the good fortune to came on this blog and have these two geniuses finally "school" me on legal procedure and correct all the false misunderstandings I learned in 17 years since I started law school.

Bloggings' great. The humor and amusement does me good. :)
 
Mar 13, 2009
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byu123 said:
Yes. I'm so grateful to "Thoughtforfood" and "BroDeal." Last night I realized I learned nothing about the law after graduating with honors from a top 20 law school, clerking for a federal judge, practicing law for 4 years, passing two bar exams, and preparing cases for prosecution in federal court for the last 10 years. But I had the good fortune to came on this blog and have these two geniuses finally "school" me on legal procedure and correct all the false misunderstandings I learned in 17 years since I started law school.
BLAH,BLAH,BLAH

For someone so smart, you're pretty stupid. Or should I say naive.
He doped, they all doped. Get over it!
 
Mar 11, 2009
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byu123 said:
A doper dopes because he is too weak or lazy to train and do what it takes to win without doping. Kohl and Jascke are worthless slugs. Fact of the matter is if you train at altitude for extended periods of time you can naturally alter your red blood cell count and gain a competitive advantage in high cardio/VO2 max athletic events as a result.

Those to lazy to spend the month of June at 8000 to 12000 feet training for 5-6 hours a day . . . dope. Those dedicated and tough enough to handle such training suck it up, do it, and have the physical ability to win without doping . . . a la Lance Armstrong. Its really very simple. Armstrong doesn't dope because he trains harder and smarter than anyone else and won 7 TDFs as a result. The lazy slugs who can't take such a regime cheat and dope in an effort to compete with the likes of Armstrong.
EXCEPT training at altitude means you train less effectively.

Read 'Bad Blood'...all dance around the gray area of what's illegal or not, what level of what is OK and what level isn't. They all have doctors, most personal doctors who only have them as a 'patient'. You can assume lance is the one shining star in the peoton if you want but.....

I's much more complicated than 'train harder at altitude and don't be lazy".

BUT I'll still watch the races, still interesting.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
byu123 said:
Yes. I'm so grateful to "Thoughtforfood" and "BroDeal." Last night I realized I learned nothing about the law after graduating with honors from a top 20 law school, clerking for a federal judge, practicing law for 4 years, passing two bar exams, and preparing cases for prosecution in federal court for the last 10 years. But I had the good fortune to came on this blog and have these two geniuses finally "school" me on legal procedure and correct all the false misunderstandings I learned in 17 years since I started law school.

Bloggings' great. The humor and amusement does me good. :)
Really, because that law school didn't teach you the burden of proof for civil cases very well. In fact, if you would like to revisit the issues, I would be happy to do so, very happy in fact.

As to the law school stuff, I highly doubt the validity of your claims based on the posts from that thread. Anyone on the internet can claim to be anything, and in this case, if you were an attorney and did go to law school, you slept through some very important classes.

This is Christian Karl Gerhartsreiter, isn't it?
 
Mar 19, 2009
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byu123 said:
Yes. I'm so grateful to "Thoughtforfood" and "BroDeal." Last night I realized I learned nothing about the law after graduating with honors from a top 20 law school, clerking for a federal judge, practicing law for 4 years, passing two bar exams, and preparing cases for prosecution in federal court for the last 10 years. But I had the good fortune to came on this blog and have these two geniuses finally "school" me on legal procedure and correct all the false misunderstandings I learned in 17 years since I started law school.

Bloggings' great. The humor and amusement does me good. :)
How is it that everything you touch turns into some utterly lame argument about law or religion?
 

whiteboytrash

BANNED
Mar 17, 2009
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whiteboytrash said:
We've all experienced it before, that moment when something gets in the way of your ambition. You meant to go riding, but it was too hot and a beer was already waiting in the fridge. You meant mow the lawn, but it looked like it might rain. You meant to tell your girlfriend you loved her, but Albert Pujols was up to bat.

I'm one of those rare people who can find art and meaning just about anywhere, including the one place most people would never expect to find it: TV. And I found it earlier tonight, a beautiful twilight in Seattle, when I hit on a new Nike TV commercial featuring Lance Armstrong. The ad campaign is a collaboration between Nike and the Lance Armstrong Foundation.

It would be easy to scoff that it's just a way to sell more shoes. And it probably is. But I came away inspired, and I have no desire. to buy a pair of Nikes right now. But as soon as I'm finished writing this, I will get on my bike and ride.

The spot, titled Driven, shows various cancer victims going through treatment and cuts away to shots of Armstrong hammering out big RPMs. He says, "The critics say I'm arrogant. A doper. Washed up. A fraud. That I couldn't let it go. They can say whatever they want. I'm not back on my bike for them."

There's just something about watching video of Armstrong on his bike before going for a ride that all but guarantees a higher cadence on your bike. I think the reason for this is that it opens a door for you to see what another human can do, and you can do more, too. It might be as simple as spinning up a hill faster than you've ever done it before. Or it might be as important as finding the will to go through another round of chemo after your cancer returns for a third time.

The thing is, though, no other athlete in my lifetime—not Jordan, Montana, or Ripken—has been able inspire people to do the little things and the big things in their lives better.

Credit the creators of the ad for the art, and Armstrong for the meaning.

He helps people turn "I meant to do it" into just do it.
 
Jun 16, 2009
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Dear BYU,

I have actually competed as a pro-cyclist, and if there is one thing you need to know it is that most cyclists who dope actually train really, really hard.

The reason they dope is that they are massively ambitious and desperately want to win -the same motivation that drives them to train like madmen too. In my personal experience I have known guys feel the heartbreak of training harder than anyone would ever believe for years and then realise that they will fall short of any real success unless they medicate themselves.

Your posts have consistently shown that you have no idea what you are talking about, and I for one am glad that I am no longer competing in a sport that now seems to be marketing itself (via LA) to complete morons such as yourself.

Please go away.

That is all.
 
Jun 16, 2009
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@ whiteboytrash

"I think the reason for this is that it opens a door for you to see what another human can do, and you can do more, too"

The problem some of us have with Lance's "inspiration" is that inside the pro-peloton it showed the other riders what another human could do and how they themselves could do more if they all went back to shooting up epo and not ever talking about doping.
 
Mar 19, 2009
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byu123 said:
A doper dopes because he is too weak or lazy to train and do what it takes to win without doping. Kohl and Jascke are worthless slugs. Fact of the matter is if you train at altitude for extended periods of time you can naturally alter your red blood cell count and gain a competitive advantage in high cardio/VO2 max athletic events as a result.

Those to lazy to spend the month of June at 8000 to 12000 feet training for 5-6 hours a day . . . dope. Those dedicated and tough enough to handle such training suck it up, do it, and have the physical ability to win without doping . . . a la Lance Armstrong. Its really very simple. Armstrong doesn't dope because he trains harder and smarter than anyone else and won 7 TDFs as a result. The lazy slugs who can't take such a regime cheat and dope in an effort to compete with the likes of Armstrong.
'kin' hell!

Another three week cycling fan willing to swallow anything Lance gives him.
 
Jun 26, 2009
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whiteboytrash said:
We've all experienced it before, that moment when something gets in the way of your ambition. You meant to go riding, but it was too hot and a beer was already waiting in the fridge. You meant mow the lawn, but it looked like it might rain. You meant to tell your girlfriend you loved her, but Albert Pujols was up to bat.

I'm one of those rare people who can find art and meaning just about anywhere, including the one place most people would never expect to find it: TV. And I found it earlier tonight, a beautiful twilight in Seattle, when I hit on a new Nike TV commercial featuring Lance Armstrong. The ad campaign is a collaboration between Nike and the Lance Armstrong Foundation.

It would be easy to scoff that it's just a way to sell more shoes. And it probably is. But I came away inspired, and I have no desire. to buy a pair of Nikes right now. But as soon as I'm finished writing this, I will get on my bike and ride.

The spot, titled Driven, shows various cancer victims going through treatment and cuts away to shots of Armstrong hammering out big RPMs. He says, "The critics say I'm arrogant. A doper. Washed up. A fraud. That I couldn't let it go. They can say whatever they want. I'm not back on my bike for them."

There's just something about watching video of Armstrong on his bike before going for a ride that all but guarantees a higher cadence on your bike. I think the reason for this is that it opens a door for you to see what another human can do, and you can do more, too. It might be as simple as spinning up a hill faster than you've ever done it before. Or it might be as important as finding the will to go through another round of chemo after your cancer returns for a third time.

The thing is, though, no other athlete in my lifetime—not Jordan, Montana, or Ripken—has been able inspire people to do the little things and the big things in their lives better.

Credit the creators of the ad for the art, and Armstrong for the meaning.

He helps people turn "I meant to do it" into just do it.
Amen to that.
 
Jun 26, 2009
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whiteboytrash said:
The thing is, though, no other athlete in my lifetime—not Jordan, Montana, or Ripken—has been able inspire people to do the little things and the big things in their lives better.
Although I have never competed in cycing, as a former competitive athlete this is why I admire Armstrong.
 
Mar 18, 2009
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WBT...fantastic post!! You are right. I am definitely no LA fan and I never have beem, but I absolutely concur with everything you said in your post. Well said!!!
 
Mar 17, 2009
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byu123 said:
Although I have never competed in cycing
I think this says a lot.

I'm not going to get into the timeless did he or did he not dope but you are very wrong to assume that dopers are worthless slugs or are lazy. You can be D**N sure that Kohl and Bella Jorg were ultra hard workers and suffered tremendously during racing and training and I will actually say that it is likely that the hardest workers are probably those who dope.

If you found out that Armstrong doped how would you feel?

You have a lot to learn yet byu123.
 
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