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Attention danger - doping in 1962

Mar 10, 2009
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If the riders from that era were to look to the future what do they see? A whole lotta doping, conspiracy, corruption, and riders looking to the future... :eek:
 
May 14, 2010
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Vive Le Tour (1962 Tour de France) Part 2

http://youtu.be/4B6ZycaBelU

1:43 "Now let's talk about doping. In cycling slang, doping is called "the charge," and "the charge" is killing the profession. Now every time someone quits he's under suspicion. This racer told us he must have eaten some bad fish. That same day, ten racers quit, and each said he'd eaten bad fish."

Just because it's worth watching from the beginning, here is the link to part 1

http://youtu.be/A3EHJjHP6yc
 
Sep 7, 2009
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Maxiton said:
Vive Le Tour (1962 Tour de France) Part 2

http://youtu.be/4B6ZycaBelU

1:43 "Now let's talk about doping. In cycling slang, doping is called "the charge," and "the charge" is killing the profession. Now every time someone quits he's under suspicion. This racer told us he must have eaten some bad fish. That same day, ten racers quit, and each said he'd eaten bad fish."

Just because it's worth watching from the beginning, here is the link to part 1

http://youtu.be/A3EHJjHP6yc

Thanks for the link. I enjoyed seeing what the tour was like 50 years ago. I take it the "charge" was amphetamines? Is that what was making them sick or was there some other kind of doping going on?
 
Jul 10, 2010
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cineteq said:
Wow, no wonder the doping culture is so ingrained. Nobody thinks he's doping. :eek:

Exactly. It was not even frowned upon in the European peloton. It was simply accepted, and kept quiet to avoid the testers. This is EXACTLY what Armstrong found, and used to his advantage, and EXACTLY the reason it has been so difficult to change. It was ingrained, ensconced in the culture, embedded, every bit a part of daily operations.

I think the only over-riding moral rule was "don't kill yourself like Tom Simpson". Anything less than that, other than shooting your speed in front of the tester, and it was "go on your way, move along."

The obvious conclusion a lot of people reach when they realize this, is that we should either disallow decades of race results, or ignore what goes on today. They think doping is doping, and if it was illegal then and illegal today, it is the same thing! But it isn't. A lot of people here don't get that. EPO changed the picture. They are focused on the technicality of doping, and not the impact it has.
 
Jul 10, 2010
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irongrl said:
Thanks for the link. I enjoyed seeing what the tour was like 50 years ago. I take it the "charge" was amphetamines? Is that what was making them sick or was there some other kind of doping going on?

Probably amphetamines. They also used painkillers. Often both. Earlier riders used cocaine - but I think that was passe' by then, and amphetamines were the choice.

Amphetamines make you more sensitive to the heat, I'm told. Less able to cool your body properly, so hot weather wasn't good for those who were "speeding".

I liked that line about the fish, too, but poor nutrition in the tours was also common enough. They were traveling, probably trying to find cheap hotels, looking for group rates, etc. Back then, water supplies were less standard than today. Part of the post-Depression post WW2 era has been the growing uniformity of municipal water. Today you can travel most of the world and drink the water. Back then, you might go from one town to another and find different bacteria in the water that your body was not accustomed to - and voila, diarrhea. :eek:

Oh - one other thing - it IS cool seeing racing 50 years ago! :)
 
cineteq said:
Wow, no wonder the doping culture is so ingrained. Nobody thinks he's doping. :eek:

Or, maybe they are like Ahnold, and only dabbled so it was ok:

""It was what I had to do to compete....

The dosage that was taken then versus taken now is not even 10 percent. It's probably 5 percent."


You know, he wasn't a real doper.

Oddly, though, that article goes on to note:

"He wasn't just another steroid user, like Bill Clinton was just another dope non-inhaler. Arnold helped father the culture of steroids. ... Before 1969, when Arnold arrived in the U.S., steroid use was rare in pro and college sports."

So, if Ahnold is the father of steroids, is Lance the father of EPO?

Dave.
 
Sep 7, 2009
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hiero2 said:
Probably amphetamines. They also used painkillers. Often both. Earlier riders used cocaine - but I think that was passe' by then, and amphetamines were the choice.

Amphetamines make you more sensitive to the heat, I'm told. Less able to cool your body properly, so hot weather wasn't good for those who were "speeding".

I liked that line about the fish, too, but poor nutrition in the tours was also common enough. They were traveling, probably trying to find cheap hotels, looking for group rates, etc. Back then, water supplies were less standard than today. Part of the post-Depression post WW2 era has been the growing uniformity of municipal water. Today you can travel most of the world and drink the water. Back then, you might go from one town to another and find different bacteria in the water that your body was not accustomed to - and voila, diarrhea. :eek:

Oh - one other thing - it IS cool seeing racing 50 years ago! :)

Thanks for the reply..I hadn't even thought about water quality issues but things were different then. I'm sure that would probably have been the cause of gastro illness. I also remember seeing somewhere that back then riders were discouraged from drinking too much water, I can't remember the reasoning, but that probably caused more heat related illness and dehydration too.
 
Oct 26, 2012
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irongrl said:
I also remember seeing somewhere that back then riders were discouraged from drinking too much water, I can't remember the reasoning, but that probably caused more heat related illness and dehydration too.

I was reading an interview with a former GAA player (Irish sports) from the 60s or 70s (can't recall who it was) a few months ago and he was saying that at one point it was thought drinking too much water was bad for you. Must have been a popular sporting science notion for a time. He certainly wasn't on drugs but even he said it was a wonder no one died.