BBC coverage

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Jul 24, 2012
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You guys and girls don't know how good you've got it! Our entire Olympic coverage is an absolute joke. We've got ex-cricketers commentating on rowing (wtf?) and diving (even bigger WTF???) and everything else.

We have Olympic champion Susie O'Neill trying to maintain a sense of dignity and professionalism whilst commentating on the swimming with two others who have chosen to go full genius. It is truly cringeworthy TV.

I'll take your cycling coverage any day in comparison to this crap! Thank God for the mute button.
 
Was wondering about a comment bbc made today that Wiggins is the first person in history to win both the Tour de France and the olympic gold in the same year. (dont know if they meant general or just tt, because they then said Indurain was the only other TDF winner to win a olympic gold but of course Ulle won the road race).

The tt was first used in 92 right? (or Indurain 96?)

But when did the road race become for pros?
 
The Hitch said:
Was wondering about a comment bbc made today that Wiggins is the first person in history to win both the Tour de France and the olympic gold in the same year. (dont know if they meant general or just tt, because they then said Indurain was the only other TDF winner to win a olympic gold but of course Ulle won the road race).

The tt was first used in 92 right? (or Indurain 96?)

But when did the road race become for pros?
The first time with professionals and the time trial was 1996.
 
Feb 28, 2010
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The Hitch said:
P and P are renowned by non cycling fans as the greatest commentators in any sport on the planet.

Does that mean we don't criticize them when theyfail to notice the situation on the road, paraphrase Fabiani or call say that Valverdes first name is Luis,
Okay only a small sample size but my partner is not a cycling fan and she thinks P and P are rubbish. I couldn't believe it when PS informed viewers that tubular tyres are solid like the tyres on penny farthings, this from a guy who must have changed a few punctured tubulars back in the 70s.

My second comment wasn't about the quality of the commentating, I haven't seen either of the RRs as I was driving through France when they were on, just that I was surprised that a couple of women with no prior interest in cycling enjoyed watching the RRs on the BBC.
 
Jun 11, 2011
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argyllflyer said:
It's just regional accents. Hugh Porter (the main commentator) has a Midlands accent and Chris Boardman (co-commentator) has a Merseyside accent (but not as strong as the Liverpool accent though).

Using your example, the word 'China' would be pronounced in quite different ways, depending on what part of the country you're from.
thanks, but if it was a regional dialect thing, then that person would say it the same every time, but that is not what is going on here, just now when South Africa won the gold in rowing, the commentator said South Africa 3 times in one sentence, the first time he said 'South Africer', then the next 2 times he pronounced it correctly, so it leads me to believe that it has something to do with what word/sound follows South Africa as to when they put that 'r' on there, but still no Brit has been able to explain this to me with any sort of grammatical rule. was this taught in school, or is it something they just pick up subconciously?
 
Jul 9, 2012
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It's called a linking (or sometimes intrusive) r. Occurs when a word ending in an r which is not normally pronounced is followed by a word beginning with a vowel.

Hope this helps.
 
CobbleStoner said:
thanks, but if it was a regional dialect thing, then that person would say it the same every time, but that is not what is going on here, just now when South Africa won the gold in rowing, the commentator said South Africa 3 times in one sentence, the first time he said 'South Africer', then the next 2 times he pronounced it correctly, so it leads me to believe that it has something to do with what word/sound follows South Africa as to when they put that 'r' on there, but still no Brit has been able to explain this to me with any sort of grammatical rule. was this taught in school, or is it something they just pick up subconciously?
I'd have to hear where the commentator in this instance is from, but it was Hugh Porter you mentioned initially and he says 'Africer' because he's a west midlander and that's generally the way they say words ending in 'A'. Someone with 'received pronunciation' would not (in my opinion) turn any 'A' ending word into slang-like 'uh' or 'er'. But yes, if the word following, as noted above, begins with another vowel the ending 'a' is likely to be altered, this will vary from region to region though.
 
Jun 1, 2011
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argyllflyer said:
I'd have to hear where the commentator in this instance is from, but it was Hugh Porter you mentioned initially and he says 'Africer' because he's a west midlander and that's generally the way they say words ending in 'A'. Someone with 'received pronunciation' would not (in my opinion) turn any 'A' ending word into slang-like 'uh' or 'er'. But yes, if the word following, as noted above, begins with another vowel the ending 'a' is likely to be altered, this will vary from region to region though.
President Kennedy used in reference to Cuba...Cuber? A MA use.
 
Interesting snippet on BBC this morning. Presenter buttering up Chris Boardman, saying that Wiggins had cited Boardman's acheivements as an inspiration. Boardman then replied that he got drawn back into involvement in cycling after retirement after a request to try to turn around a talented but wayward 14-year-old called Bradley Wiggins.

But Boardman was still competing in 2000, when Wiggins was already 20 years old and holder of an Olympic bronze medal...
 
May 3, 2011
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Armchair cyclist said:
Interesting snippet on BBC this morning. Presenter buttering up Chris Boardman, saying that Wiggins had cited Boardman's acheivements as an inspiration. Boardman then replied that he got drawn back into involvement in cycling after retirement after a request to try to turn around a talented but wayward 14-year-old called Bradley Wiggins.

But Boardman was still competing in 2000, when Wiggins was already 20 years old and holder of an Olympic bronze medal...
In his newspaper column after the Tour, Boardman wrote that he started working with Wiggins after Wiggo got silver to Mcgee's gold in the 2002 Commonwealth Games. The aim was to help turn it into a gold at the next Olympics. He said his part was very small though
 
Feb 28, 2010
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Richeypen said:
In his newspaper column after the Tour, Boardman wrote that he started working with Wiggins after Wiggo got silver to Mcgee's gold in the 2002 Commonwealth Games. The aim was to help turn it into a gold at the next Olympics. He said his part was very small though
In one article Wiggins stated that Boardman was called in to sort him out, and that the latter would conduct face-to-face interviews with him at which he took minutes! Boardman would then refer back to these minutes to remind Wiggins of the promises he had made when he felt he was not pulling his weight. Wiggins' version makes it sound as if Boardman played a large part in his development as a top cyclist.
 
Sep 9, 2009
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"in an age of African domination, Mo Farah has made the impossible seem probably - a British distance winner"

I'm sorry, but that statement is basically entrapment to pointing out politically incorrect truths and ruining a dinner party.
 
Waterloo Sunrise said:
"in an age of African domination, Mo Farah has made the impossible seem probably - a British distance winner"

I'm sorry, but that statement is basically entrapment to pointing out politically incorrect truths and ruining a dinner party.
And where was Mo born ?



He is as British as Froome.
;)
 
The Sheep said:
He was mumbling a lot yesterday, has he changed today?
He went into depth about the logistics of a team.pursuit and also about the difference between the training the tp.team did from the road team back in the early season in mallorka.

Not phd material, but far better than the early"expertise" in the road events
 
Some real disrespect to the 10000m. Dibaba takes a 3rd gold medal to become one of the most successful long.distance athletes ever and bbc don't even ask their athletics panel to comment on it. Most other sports.are getting more attention in the heats than the 10k gets in the gold.medal.

Add to the total rejection with which bbc treats triathlon and one begins to think they the reason bbc treats road cycling so badly is that thy hate endurance sports.
 
The Hitch said:
Some real disrespect to the 10000m. Dibaba takes a 3rd gold medal to become one of the most successful long.distance athletes ever and bbc don't even ask their athletics panel to comment on it. Most other sports.are getting more attention in the heats than the 10k gets in the gold.medal.

Add to the total rejection with which bbc treats triathlon and one begins to think they the reason bbc treats road cycling so badly is that thy hate endurance sports.
Maybe that was due to the 10,000 metres over-running so they had to cut the program short and the next program was a highlights program?
 
Frosty said:
Maybe that was due to the 10,000 metres over-running so they had to cut the program short and the next program was a highlights program?
No, they had time to talk to Seb Coe and then after that ask Johnson and (Edwards was it?) how the olympics were going, how they enjoyed the first day of track and field.

Not that, "what a phenonmenal performance from Dibaba", "yeah it was incredible, well done for the 3rd gold", would have taken more than 15 seconds.
 
The Hitch said:
Some real disrespect to the 10000m. Dibaba takes a 3rd gold medal to become one of the most successful long.distance athletes ever and bbc don't even ask their athletics panel to comment on it. Most other sports.are getting more attention in the heats than the 10k gets in the gold.medal.

Add to the total rejection with which bbc treats triathlon and one begins to think they the reason bbc treats road cycling so badly is that thy hate endurance sports.
Did you hear Brendan Foster compare 10,000m tactics to cycling? (I've also heard the swimming and rowing commentators do the same). I can't imagine that would've happened one month ago.
 
Oct 30, 2011
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Geraint Too Fast said:
Did you hear Brendan Foster compare 10,000m tactics to cycling? (I've also heard the swimming and rowing commentators do the same). I can't imagine that would've happened one month ago.
Yeah, I was quite amazed when I heard that in rowing - "It's a bit like a peloton."
 
gooner said:
BBC have been getting complaints about the way some of their presenters are conducting interviews.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2183507/BBC-lacking-sensitivity-Olympic-interviews-say-spectators.html
I dont know if any of the examples in the article were particularly bad, but if its insensitivity towards athletes that is getting out the complaints, i suspect they might get a few for treating Adlingtons bronze as if it was the greatest failure in Olympic history.
 

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