Carbon Clinchers

May 27, 2010
868
0
0
I am looking at getting some deep profile carbon wheels for my roadie. I was wondering if anyone has got carbon clinchers and can tell me about them because I heard they crack at the rim easily.

Should I get them? Do they work just like normal clinchers???

Thanks in advance
 
Feb 16, 2011
1,457
0
0
I'm looking at some Dura Ace C35's which have an alloy rim and a carbon fairing. I'm not too keen on all-carbon clinchers for the same reason you are and that braking isn't as good even with special pads.
 
Mar 13, 2009
571
0
0
Personally I don't quite get them, but I have lots of mates who use them.
My trainers are 32mm alloy and weigh 1500grams, the same manufacturer makes a carbon (46mm) and it weighs in at 1600grms! I have the Tubular version in 46 and they are 1270... (though there is a premium version for a lazy $5k that is less than 1000 grams)
So the way I see it carbon clincher is heavier, dearer, brakes the same, doesn't ride as well (yes part of that is due to the tyre) When compared to Alloy the gains are REALLY minimal... marginal aero advantage
Tub's have a small disadvantage in the Hassle of mounting or if you puncture, but that can be minimised with slime or the like

Long story, but don't be scared of Tubs, and 0nce you use them you will happy not to go back
 
Aug 4, 2009
1,056
0
0
I an using reynolds but you need to treat them with respect they will crack like any wheel if you hit then hard.
Main issue is break pads swiss stop are good but expencive you need them due to heat from braking with carbon surface. You can get alloy breaking surface but not true full Carbon clincher
 
Mar 19, 2009
2,703
0
0
Carbon clinchers are kind of a joke, more expensive to manufacture, heavier than tubulars, kind of defeats the whole purpose of a race wheel. Additionally, carbon wheels aren't meant to be an everyday wheel, that's why you're see all these people who get confused by carbon clinchers thinking they're going to be putting lots of miles on them, the mfg's are creating a mess of warranty issues for themselves just to make a $$ from the consumer who aren't necessarily racing on them. I have one set prototyped for my company, they ride fine, but I would never race them or put them in my model line up. If you don't race you'll get much better mileage and braking performance from alloy rims.
 
Apr 3, 2009
138
0
0
Last summer I upgraded to a set of Bontrager Aeolous 5.0s. I rode them from June until late October and had no problem whatsoever with the wheels. The issue I ran into was that I could not run the lightweight tubes. At the time I was around 210lbs and my fat @$$ seemed to pop those suckers quite easily. I switched back to regular weight tubes and no issue.

Now the reason I got the Bontragers was that my old Race X Lites had cracked at the nipples in three spots on the rim after only a year and probably around 5k miles. So knowing full well that I could either get a replacement or money towards a upgrade, I went with the upgrade. Had I been thinking more clearly, rather with the fervor of suddenly realizing I could get a set of carbon wheels I would have got the replacements and then bought a set of Zipp 303s for the same price as the Bontragers after the trade-in. I say the Zipps because they are true aero wheels, the Bontragers are great but the faring is bonded to the rim of an XXX Lite.

Overall though I am really happy with the wheels and furthermore, I live in New Hampshire where frost heaves really do a number on our roads. My weight combined with the varying road conditions made me hesitant at first, but after a full summer I can say I had no problem. That isn't to say you won't have an issue, you could be that one person that gets the wheels and they have an issue. See if you can demo a set first, that is how I fell in love or rather lust with carbon wheels.

Then again according to some posters here, only those who race should have fancy expensive wheels...
 
Jul 10, 2009
91
0
0
Jet black make some good cork brake pads for carbon wheels. Deep section carbon clinchers are probably most appropriate for long distance triathlon where the braking issue isn't such a problem and there is no service vehicle to replace your wheel if you puncture. Many triathletes still use tubulars and carry a spare pre glued tyre though.
 
Feb 16, 2011
1,457
0
0
I've heard around the traps that deep-section rims seem to result in more punctures, an observation that was repeated by the commentators on Eurosport for Flanders.

What is the relationship, if any, between deep-section rims and punctures? Something to do with stiffer rims and pinch flats?
 
May 27, 2010
868
0
0
Thanks all for the reply's. I was a little wary about the carbon clinchers to start with, they seemed more like marketing thing to me but hey it doesn't hurt to ask.

I'm defiently going for some tubulers now, hopefully i can find some soon
 
Oct 31, 2010
172
0
0
Nothing to do with "new" rims but I bought a set of what I thought were top flight carbon rims, not naming any names except that the company began with a L and has something to do with how heavy (or not) the are.. Anyhoos' I bought them off a mate who'd used them about 30 times for TT work and he said they were excellent, I bought them and I think they're useless. After every 200miles or so they need truing up all over again.. I thought they'd bed in but they don't, they slip and wobble if you don't keep them in true..
I couldn't be bothered to do this after a couple of hundred miles, so I've sold them..
 
Mar 10, 2009
1,384
0
0
cawright1375 said:
Then again according to some posters here, only those who race should have fancy expensive wheels...
To be accurate, and to cross threads for which I apologise, the perceived wisdom is that riding deep section carbon wheels for daily use is to create a right royal pain in the *ss for yourself. The main reasons being cost, fragility and reliability. And weight if you opt for clinchers over tubs.

In my experience, very few people here begrudge anybody having a 'Sunday best' set of wheels for the occasional special ride or, indeed, for racing (Mine are Mavic Ksyrium SL's shod with Conti Sprinter Gatorskin tubs which are released for our monthly centuries. So far, I've not embarrassed myself by catching a flat. Respect, Caffe Latex :))
 
Mar 18, 2009
14,634
1
0
I tell you what really sucks. I went riding with one of these tools Friday. He brought his Zipps, 404 in front and 808 in back. He virtually stopped at every railroad track. Any blemish on the road caused a slowdown. Chip and seal made his bike sound like it was about to fall apart. I don't know if it was fear of wind, bad bike handling, or what, but the dude would crawl around corners, like braking for every freaking corner. And he spent a good deal of the time complaining about the crappy road conditions, which I thought were pretty good for the most part. On the upside :rolleyes: his bike looked pro, and to many dumbasses riding something that looks good is better than riding something that works good.
 
Jul 27, 2009
749
0
0
Let me quote from Pez Cycling's Etiquette Guide.

Carbon Wheels. Carbon wheels are for racing! Never under any circumstances should they be brought out on a training ride. Training wheels should be strong and heavy with lots and lots of spokes. Carbon wheels say to the group, I’m not strong enough to do this ride without my $2,000 feather weight wheels. If you have the money to tear up a carbon wheel set on the road, then you’d be better off spending it on a coach who will get you fit enough to keep up with the group ride on regular training wheels.

And that's all there really is to it.
 
BroDeal said:
I tell you what really sucks. I went riding with one of these tools Friday. He brought his Zipps, 404 in front and 808 in back. He pactically stopped at every railroad track. Any blemish on the road caused a slowdown. Chip and seal made his bike sound like it was about to fall apart. I don't know if it was fear of wind, bad bike handling, or what, but the dude would crawl around corners, like braking for every freaking corner. And he spent a good deal of the time complaining about the crappy road conditions, which I thought were pretty good for the most part. On the upside :rolleyes: his bike looked pro, and to many dumbasses riding something that looks good is better than riding something that works good.
you look mahhhhevelous! if you look marvelous, you are...:rolleyes:
 
Mar 19, 2009
2,703
0
0
BroDeal said:
I tell you what really sucks. I went riding with one of these tools Friday. He brought his Zipps, 404 in front and 808 in back. He virtually stopped at every railroad track. Any blemish on the road caused a slowdown. Chip and seal made his bike sound like it was about to fall apart. I don't know if it was fear of wind, bad bike handling, or what, but the dude would crawl around corners, like braking for every freaking corner. And he spent a good deal of the time complaining about the crappy road conditions, which I thought were pretty good for the most part. On the upside :rolleyes: his bike looked pro, and to many dumbasses riding something that looks good is better than riding something that works good.
Totally agree! Most of my crew rolls 32 and 36 hole bomber wheels to put the junk miles in, we be bunny hopping those tracks at full clip. Somehow to me this is more fun than declaring with hand on hip I ride carbon wheels because my wallet allows me to. We're all really impressed. Good luck doing that on a daily basis with carbon race wheels, unless you've got service course following you on all your training rides. :rolleyes:-
 
May 27, 2010
868
0
0
Does anyone know anything about matrix wheels??? I found a cheapish set but I can't find a website about them or any reviews. I just want to know if they are a proper brand or just some stickers on wheels
 
Jun 10, 2009
606
0
0
RDV4ROUBAIX said:
Totally agree! Most of my crew rolls 32 and 36 hole bomber wheels to put the junk miles in, we be bunny hopping those tracks at full clip. Somehow to me this is more fun than declaring with hand on hip I ride carbon wheels because my wallet allows me to. We're all really impressed. Good luck doing that on a daily basis with carbon race wheels, unless you've got service course following you on all your training rides. :rolleyes:-
Oh please. I know I'm over-reacting to your post, but for some reason I can't help but step in and defend poor Fred against this dubious slur.:eek:

I totally agree with the points made about about the practicality (or lack thereof) of carbon clinchers, but for many, cost and practicality aren't the only, or even the major parts of the equation, in cycling as in any other part of life. Are all your shoes the sturdiest most comfortable option on the market, or do you have some dress shoes that match your best suit? Do you drive an old toyota camry, because anything else is flaunting your wealth and less practical to boot? Avoid hot curries and alcohol because they have unpleasant after effects?

Stop laughing at Fred for a minute and consider that your "junk miles" just might be his "riding along having a good time miles" (or in maybe his only miles). If Fred wants to ride carbon wheels because he thinks they make him look cool, and that makes him feel good riding his bike, why should you care what wheels he's riding? Maybe he's not making any sort of "declaration" about the size of his wallet, it just happens that the cost of the wheels is worthwhile to him, by whatever criteria he derives value? Ever consider that perhaps you, rolling smugly by on your 36 hole open-pros with your like minded 'crew', are the one who is conceited?

If Fred isn't a hard man, doesn't ride thousands of "junk miles" anyway, and takes just a little care where he places his wheels (or maybe the dude can actually bunny hop those rail tracks without smacking his back wheel, generally the preferred way of doing it or so I hear), there is no reason why he should need a service course following him around.

FWIW, there are full carbon clinchers around for only A$699 a pair nowadays, so we're not even talking about big money anymore. If they didn't brake like cr*p it would would be worth buying a set just to annoy those people that have a philosophical objection to anyone except a sponsored pro riding deep-dish carbon:p
 
Oct 29, 2010
90
0
0
Has anyone checked if the OP is going to race? His comment about going with tubular CF wheels was curious; maybe he's not familiar with the joys of tubular repair, which is tolerable if you're racing but otherwise not so much.
 
Mar 31, 2009
51
0
0
Brings to mind a one race last year - lined-out at 50 kph on some of Surrey's finest, there's a 'trench' across the road with an inch-high edge - rider alongside on his Zipps hits the edge and double-punctures - I'm riding tubs, hit the edge and carry-on regardless. Next lap, same point on the course and guy on the inside riding Cosmics - hit's edge, 'bang' and its out the race for him too. Mid-pack in a RR you have little room for manoeuvre - if there's a pothole you just have to hit-it and pray - for that reason alone I prefer tubs - Paying more for heavier, more fragile wheels for the sake of 'convenience' seems kinda pointless.
 
Jul 23, 2009
1,120
0
0
RDV4ROUBAIX said:
Totally agree! Most of my crew rolls 32 and 36 hole bomber wheels to put the junk miles in, we be bunny hopping those tracks at full clip. Somehow to me this is more fun than declaring with hand on hip I ride carbon wheels because my wallet allows me to. We're all really impressed. Good luck doing that on a daily basis with carbon race wheels, unless you've got service course following you on all your training rides. :rolleyes:-
I got a great deal on some Spinergy clincher wheels and use them fairly regularly. I suppose I should be concerned with them failing at speed but I like them over rough roads much better than the aluminum wheels that I have available since they are smoother, slightly lighter, and they look kind of cool :D

- and as to BroDeal's comment about someone who slowed for corners and railroad tracks, I find that I go no slower with the carbon over anything rough, perhaps just a little faster since I don't feel like my teeth are rattled as much.

As far as puncturing goes. I have had one flat when I hit a pothole at speed over the course of approximately 2200 miles of riding those wheels during the past year. I had more flats on the other wheels from similar road issues (and glass, thorns and other road debris) but I seriously doubt that I would have avoided a puncture on the aluminum wheels had I been riding them that night.
 
Jul 23, 2009
1,120
0
0
woodie said:
I am looking at getting some deep profile carbon wheels for my roadie. I was wondering if anyone has got carbon clinchers and can tell me about them because I heard they crack at the rim easily.

Should I get them? Do they work just like normal clinchers???

Thanks in advance
I have Carbon Clinchers - paid about $1150 new. They weigh 1500 grams (just a little less than Race X Lites and Mavic Ksyrium SSC SL). The sidewalls are very thick, they cannot take more than 120 pounds of pressure according to the warning sticker, it is more difficult to take the tires on and off of the rims, but they ride much smoother than either the Race X Lites or Mavics. I really have enjoyed riding them but have not given up riding my aluminum wheelsets. I would say the biggest complaint I have is that the spokes are round and thick and seem not to descend as well as the X Lites, however, after I had about 1500 miles on them they seemed to have loosened up and are rolling faster.

That is my two cents.
 
May 27, 2010
868
0
0
Gaear Grimsrud said:
Has anyone checked if the OP is going to race? His comment about going with tubular CF wheels was curious; maybe he's not familiar with the joys of tubular repair, which is tolerable if you're racing but otherwise not so much.
Sorry I should have put that in my first post. Yes I want the wheels for racing, I don't see the point in buying carbon wheels if your not going to race them, thats what they're made for. I was just wondering if carbon clinchers are combarable to tubulars because i'd heard bad things about them. I think i'm going to go with tubulars now which means I just have to save longer.

Does anyone know anything about matrix wheels?????
 
Dec 14, 2009
15
0
0
I live somewhere pretty flat, so I like deep wheels for racing, I was open minded when I bought my Reynolds SDV66 clinchers, they were a really good price (sponsored) and the weight hasn't really bothered me, I guess I am a bit of a strong man rather than a mountain goat, and prefer stiffness and aero to lightweight any day though.

My Reynolds are certainly top of the line wheels, they were a fair bit more than a new set of Zipps or anything would have cost at the time and I have had no quality issues apart from finding a lose spoke after a particularly brutal race, but they were easy to true, just take the tyre and tape off and put the spoke key in them (internal nipples). Braking has been perfect with my Reynolds carbon pads, I have no limit on tyre pressure or rider weight, and they certainly are fast, despite the 1660gr claimed weight, anything I lose going uphill is easily made up on the downhills, because braking is seriously not a problem on a good set of carbon clinchers.

As for durability, I was riding alongside a guy on zipp 404 tubulars at a tour last year, we got to a set of train tracks and his wheels exploded, 2 broken rims! This was a guy who was a climber as well, he weighed less than me.
I regularly bunnyhop train tracks at 50km/h on mine and they are sweet as, never punctured, cracked or otherwise.

Well thats just my experience with carbon clinchers, and my advice is, if you get some, get them from industry experts like Reynolds, not any of the cheap brands. You will get what you pay for.
 
Jan 10, 2010
19
0
0
I prefer the carbon rims because they do absorb road shock so much better than the typical stiff alloy rim. ( I have 6 different alloy wheels sets, including a pair of the legendary bombproof Ksyrium SL wheels)

My wife and I both ride Reynolds Attack carbon clinchers for training. I have well over 10,000 miles on mine (which weight a bit over 1400g), including a number of pretty big pothole hits, and they have not even had to be trued.

I did catch a big pothole on my DV46UL Tubulars in a race which cracked the rim, but am getting a free replacement from Reynolds.
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
A Cycling Gear & Accessories 6

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS