• The Cycling News forum is looking to add some volunteer moderators with Red Rick's recent retirement. If you're interested in helping keep our discussions on track, send a direct message to @SHaines here on the forum, or use the Contact Us form to message the Community Team.

    In the meanwhile, please use the Report option if you see a post that doesn't fit within the forum rules.

    Thanks!

Country with the best 'new generation'

Aug 22, 2009
123
0
0
Visit site
Thoughts? Netherlands look fairly strong - Gesink, Mollema, Boom, Hoogerland/Bos (Albeit a bit older). I'm sure there are others I have missed also. How about other countries?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Ireland... Its been 25 years, a new roche/kelly era is about to begin..
 
Indeed, France, Ireland and the Netherlands have all been out of the game for too long, and I'd like to see them all make comebacks. Sicard and Feillu both look promising, and both have signed with non-French teams for next year, which is probably something that any up-and-coming French rider would be well advised to do . . .

By the way, does anyone else think that Sicard looks like Louison Bobet?

Bobet.gif


worlds09esprr-podium.jpg
 
yetanothergreenworld said:
Indeed, France, Ireland and the Netherlands have all been out of the game for too long, and I'd like to see them all make comebacks. Sicard and Feillu both look promising, and both have signed with non-French teams for next year, which is probably something that any up-and-coming French rider would be well advised to do . . .

By the way, does anyone else think that Sicard looks like Louison Bobet?

Bobet.gif


worlds09esprr-podium.jpg

Is it? While I like Euskaltel, they're hardly the most innocent team around, are they? And look what happened to the last French guy at Vacansoleil.

From a training etc. point of view, I hardly believe that people have said about how they are stuck in the past and know nothing about technology or nutrition - they are professional cycling teams, how could they not take what they do seriously enough to do things properly?

And yeah, I think their chin/lower jaw look kinda similar.
 
I know Norway is not big enough to have a dominating impact on the world of cycling as a whole so they can't really be said to have the "best" new generation.

But, comparing the future of Norwegian cycling to the past it seems that the next generation of Norwegian cyclists will have a greater impact on the cycling world than before. In the last 10 years the main exposure has come from Kurt Asle Arvesen and Thor Hushovd with only some sporadic appearences by other riders. Now on the other hand there seems to be a very solid base for producing more pro worthy riders than before.

Team Joker Bianchi has already produced EBH and some others have followed in his footsteps. Then there is also Team Sparebanken Vest that also provides a good stepping stone for younger riders and most recently we have the new continental team Plussbank Cervélo owned by Thor Hushovd that will focus on providing a stepping stone for cyclists from the south of Norway.

So, eventhough they might not be the "best" new generation we should expect to see a steady presence of more norwegians in the pro ranks than before.
 
Mar 19, 2009
257
0
0
Visit site
battery89 said:
Thoughts? Netherlands look fairly strong - Gesink, Mollema, Boom, Hoogerland/Bos (Albeit a bit older). I'm sure there are others I have missed also. How about other countries?

What strikes me is the problems italian cycling seems to have: a lot of older riders (Petacchi, Basso, Garzelli, Rebellin, Di Luca, Paolini) who still have good results and no real "coming men". Guys like Malacarne, Capecchi or Guarnieri had a decent pro debut. But none of them really excelled or are in the same league as Kreuziger, Hagen, Gesink, Ciolek or Taaramae. Ginanni had a great 2008 but couldn't progress this year. I thought he was could be the new Pozzato. The only youngster (although he's turning 25 soon) who really made a step forward was Nibali.

As far as my country is concerned (Belgium), i don't like to do predictions. The generation born between 70-76 quickly was very decent at a rather young age (Verheyen, Van De Wouwer, Planckaert, Planckaert, Bruylandts, VDB) but could never confirm. So i'd rather be carefull, but if i follow the press and the fans, guys like Seeldraeyers (best young rider at the Giro), Goddaert (sprinter), Bakelants (tour de l'avenir winner), Hermans (Ardennes) and Maes (flat classics) should do it. And i'm pretty sure we'll keep on producing future Flanders & Paris-Roubaix winners, which is the most important thing for the belgian fans, but which is quite sad IMO. But again, these riders are a level below the the ones named above.
 
The Netherlands does indeed have quite a promising crop; the OP even forgot about guys like Langeveld, Leezer, Maaskant, Reus as well as up and comers like Vermeltfoort (ruled out for most of this season with mono, just like Mollema), Kreder and Ricardo van de Velde (going to/at Garmin), Dennis van Winden and Steven Kruiswijk (both going to the Rabo pro ranks). The Rabo continental team seems to be producing some serious talent since now that it's been around for a few years. Having two more Dutch pro teams certainly doesn't hurt the situation either.

Belgium has a wealth of young talent too. While Greg van Avermaet and Jurgen Roelants both had somewhat underwhelming seasons after riding so well in '08, both still have sick amounts of talent and I'll continue to expect great things from those two. Monfort, Devenyns and Van den Broeck (to a lesser extent Pauwels), while none are juniors anymore, are still emerging and have yet to peak. Bakelants, Seeldraeyers, Goddaert, Hermans, Cornu, Vanendert and Francis de Greef are all talents yet to fully emerge. Good times for Belgium to be had post-Hoste and Boonen.

Spain, while currently top dog in the talent pool rankings, have very little talent coming through. Luis Leon Sanchez is of course a top guy, and Jose Rojas certainly has promise but after that there is little.
 
I'll say the Isle of Man, any other time i'd say Great Britain, but considering the crop coming through in that small island after Cavendish, with Peter and Tim Kennaugh, Jonny Bellis and a couple of others who I have seen recently. All of whom could quite easily make the step up to top level cycling either now or in the next 2 to 3 years. Bear in mind those whose names I can't remember are still teenagers.
 
Jul 11, 2009
791
0
0
Visit site
I'm gonna put a word in for the Australians cos I'm biased.

Althought they are a few years younger than some of the other newbies, guys like Jack Brobridge and Leigh Howard are genuinely exciting prospects. Richie Porte is another guy who is on the up a strong and smart stage racer. Also look out for Tim Roe riding for Trek-Livestrong next year.
 
53 x 11 said:
I'm gonna put a word in for the Australians cos I'm biased.

Althought they are a few years younger than some of the other newbies, guys like Jack Brobridge and Leigh Howard are genuinely exciting prospects. Richie Porte is another guy who is on the up a strong and smart stage racer. Also look out for Tim Roe riding for Trek-Livestrong next year.

Another youngster is the current UCI Junior world TT champion, 18 yo Luke Durbridge from Western Australia.
 
Mar 19, 2009
257
0
0
Visit site
Moondance said:
The Netherlands does indeed have quite a promising crop; the OP even forgot about guys like Langeveld, Leezer, Maaskant, Reus as well as up and comers like Vermeltfoort (ruled out for most of this season with mono, just like Mollema), Kreder and Ricardo van de Velde (going to/at Garmin), Dennis van Winden and Steven Kruiswijk (both going to the Rabo pro ranks). The Rabo continental team seems to be producing some serious talent since now that it's been around for a few years. Having two more Dutch pro teams certainly doesn't hurt the situation either.

Belgium has a wealth of young talent too. While Greg van Avermaet and Jurgen Roelants both had somewhat underwhelming seasons after riding so well in '08, both still have sick amounts of talent and I'll continue to expect great things from those two. Monfort, Devenyns and Van den Broeck (to a lesser extent Pauwels), while none are juniors anymore, are still emerging and have yet to peak. Bakelants, Seeldraeyers, Goddaert, Hermans, Cornu, Vanendert and Francis de Greef are all talents yet to fully emerge. Good times for Belgium to be had post-Hoste and Boonen.

I really forgot about Cornu; i hope skill-shimano can fix this guy. He has some serious confidence issues.
 
53 x 11 said:
I'm gonna put a word in for the Australians cos I'm biased.

Althought they are a few years younger than some of the other newbies, guys like Jack Brobridge and Leigh Howard are genuinely exciting prospects. Richie Porte is another guy who is on the up a strong and smart stage racer. Also look out for Tim Roe riding for Trek-Livestrong next year.

+1 agreed also add Jai Crawford and Cam Meyer to that list.......the future looks promising ..
 
Apr 12, 2009
1,087
2
0
Visit site
Moondance said:
Spain, while currently top dog in the talent pool rankings, have very little talent coming through. Luis Leon Sanchez is of course a top guy, and Jose Rojas certainly has promise but after that there is little.

Jonathan Castroviejo is somebody that I think could be really good, also johan le bon from france just 18 years old