Giro d'Italia 2020, stage 16: Udine › San Daniele del Friuli (229k)

Rest day is over, time to race again.

Stage 16: Udine – S.Daniele del Friuli 229 km
Tuesday, October 20th, 10:10 CEST





Technical Overview:
The killer third week opens with a very hard and long medium mountain stage in Friuli. From the city of Udine the riders will have only 19 km of flat before starting the first climb of the day, which is also the hardest: Madonnina del Domm (GPM2, 10.8 km at 7.1%), with almost 8 km at 8.8% before an easier final stretch, will definitely cause a great fight for the break of the day, both uphill and downhill, as the descent is very technical. The riders will then reach the town of Cividale, from which the road will stay mostly flat for 25 km. The second GPM of the day is significantly easier but still a decent climb, Monte Spig (GPM3, 6.4 km at 7%). The descent is also easier this time, and brings back to Cividale del Friuli, that features the first intermediate sprint. From there, 30 km of flat more before the third climb, short and similar in gradient to the previous climb: Monteaperta (GPM3, 3.7 km at 7.4%). From its descent the peloton will head towards the final circuit, that is to be repeated three times. It is 27 km long and features three climbs, only one of which is categorized. The first climb is the road to Susans Castle (1 km at 7.2%), a completely straight road which includes gradients up to 16% in the final ramp. 5 km later the GPM starts: Monte di Ragogna (GPM3, 2.8 km at 10.4%). The descent is narrow and quite tricky, and after flat 7-8 km the final climb in the finishing town of S.Daniele begins, with a short 20% ramp in the last km and a 10% home stretch.



The Climbs:
Madonnina del Domm: GPM2, 10.8 km at 7.1%

A tough climb placed where it hurts the most, straight at the beginning of the stage after a rest day.


Monte Spig: GPM3, 6.4 km at 7%
Rather average climb in the context of this stage, but still pretty good compared to most GPM3.

Monteaperta: GPM3, 3.7 km at 7.4%
Short but quite steep. Pity that it is so isolated from anything else.

Monte di Ragogna: GPM3, 2.8 km at 10.4%
A proper wall that will likely decide the stage and might even produce GC drama.


What to expect:
It is a very tricky stage, coming after a rest day. The pace will be hard on the first climb and if a GC favourite gets into trouble this could become a carnage. The final circuit alone will also provide some good chances for attacks, even if the peloton takes it easy in the first half of the stage.


San Daniele del Friuli
 
Reactions: Rollthedice
This is made for Sagan and Ulissi, unless break takes it. Hope Sagan takes it, just to boost his confidence for the 2021 Classics season;)
Hasn't Sagan shown he doesn't have the climbing legs for these gradients this Tour? This is Ulissi/Fulgsang territory. The steep uphill finish as opposed to flat tips the balance of power towards Fulgsang.
 
Hasn't Sagan shown he doesn't have the climbing legs for these gradients this Tour? This is Ulissi/Fulgsang territory. The steep uphill finish as opposed to flat tips the balance of power towards Fulgsang.
I think the first climb is not an issue here, too early in the race and the peloton will get back together, unless they let a break go... The Monte di Ragogna should be "doable" for Sagan if he really wants it... Plus, the uphill sprint, too...
 
Yesterday they switched between RVV and (mostly) the Giro. I subscribe via Prime and I thought at least one of the 16 Xtra channels would have RVV on it, but no. Pretty pathetic, I'm definitely getting GCN race pass next season.
Yes I know. Fortunetely slovakian national television broadcasted Ronde because they have long term rights because of Sagan. I fear they will switch Giro and Vuelta as well.
 
I think the first climb is not an issue here, too early in the race and the peloton will get back together, unless they let a break go... The Monte di Ragogna should be "doable" for Sagan if he really wants it... Plus, the uphill sprint, too...
Oh, I'm not worried about the first climb in regards to Sagan's chances either. It's the Ragogna that will be his undoing. 2.8kms at 10.4 is just too big an ask for Sagan at this point. Furthermore, in the likely event he's dropped he has only 8kms of flat after the descent to reel in attackers. Agreed, if he somehow makes it to the uphill sprint with the main group he'll be in prime position. I'd still take Ulissi and definitely Fulgsang over him...


As an aside, this climb seems similar to Cote de la Croix Neuve-Mende, albeit slightly shorter and steeper. How have Sagan and other favourites preformed on that climb?
 
Reactions: richwallone
The best choice for Astana would probably be to try to get Felline into the break. That way he can help Fuglsang if he attacks (but not when he gets a mechanical/puncture) or contest the stage himself. He seems to be back/close to his pre-illness level again.
 
In Denmark we have two different non-Eurosport channels showing each race. (or either race? You know, one channel showing the Giro a different one the Vuelta).

I've said it before, just move up here.
Has that come with the successes of Fuglsang and Pedersen or has it always been that way?
I guess I could learn Danish, does not seem that far away from German... House by the sea would be nice... What do you think are the main difficulties of your language?
 
I’m always impressed by the number of pros Denmark produces. It has roughly the same population as Ireland. Neither country has high mountains, but Ireland generally has a better landscape for training purposes. Denmark has some very good historic pros, but none with the palmares or local fame of a Kelly or even a Stephen Roche. And yet nowadays they produce so many good riders. It’s just a conveyer belt, while in Ireland at any one time there is always precisely one (1) high quality talent waiting to go pro at any one time. Having cycling on tv all the time might partly explain it!
 
Has that come with the successes of Fuglsang and Pedersen or has it always been that way?
I guess I could learn Danish, does not seem that far away from German... House by the sea would be nice... What do you think are the main difficulties of your language?
I think it has been like that for quite a while, actually, but the Danish success is of course only helping.

I'm afraid our language is very, very irregular. It's a difficult discipline to point out the difficult parts of a language you were intelligent enough to learn when being a small kid. But I would imagine it being extremely difficult to always guessing correctly how a word should be pronounced given the spelling. We do have the same weird word other as German (although not as extreme with the verb at the end-thing).
 

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