Giro d'Italia 2021 Race Thread - Enthusiastic Laymen Edition

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Who will win the Giro in case neither Yates nor Bernal does?


  • Total voters
    59
  • Poll closed .
So, the team line-ups are slowly ticking in. Androni are taking the 18-year-old Ukrainian Andrii Ponomar, so I thought that must be the youngest participant since forever.

But boy was I wrong. According to the list below, in 1989 the Cuban Yans Carlos Arias Pérez rode the Giro at 3 years of age. Not quite as impressive, however, as Alberto Fernández de la Puebla who rode the race in 1983 - 2 years before he was born!


I must say that his inclusion seems a bit strange, especially when you consider that they didn't even let Bernal do the Giro when they had him in the fold as a 20-year-old in 2017.
 
So, the team line-ups are slowly ticking in. Androni are taking the 18-year-old Ukrainian Andrii Ponomar, so I thought that must be the youngest participant since forever.

But boy was I wrong. According to the list below, in 1989 the Cuban Yans Carlos Arias Pérez rode the Giro at 3 years of age. Not quite as impressive, however, as Alberto Fernández de la Puebla who rode the race in 1983 - 2 years before he was born!


I must say that his inclusion seems a bit strange, especially when you consider that they didn't even let Bernal do the Giro when they had him in the fold as a 20-year-old in 2017.
Especially since Ponomar, while one of the 5 best of his junior class, didn't really dominate either. Then again, not a lot of possibilities for him last year to show himself. He's a genuine talent though.
 
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So, the team line-ups are slowly ticking in. Androni are taking the 18-year-old Ukrainian Andrii Ponomar, so I thought that must be the youngest participant since forever.

But boy was I wrong. According to the list below, in 1989 the Cuban Yans Carlos Arias Pérez rode the Giro at 3 years of age. Not quite as impressive, however, as Alberto Fernández de la Puebla who rode the race in 1983 - 2 years before he was born!


I must say that his inclusion seems a bit strange, especially when you consider that they didn't even let Bernal do the Giro when they had him in the fold as a 20-year-old in 2017.
They must know he's got a big engine because he also rode Milano - Sanremo as his debut among the pros.
 
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So, the team line-ups are slowly ticking in. Androni are taking the 18-year-old Ukrainian Andrii Ponomar, so I thought that must be the youngest participant since forever.

But boy was I wrong. According to the list below, in 1989 the Cuban Yans Carlos Arias Pérez rode the Giro at 3 years of age. Not quite as impressive, however, as Alberto Fernández de la Puebla who rode the race in 1983 - 2 years before he was born!
First case: "Yes, he's doing the race on a tricycle. Yes, he needs to stop and have a nap every stage. Yes, he's being pretty slow, but he will get through!"

Second case: "We ARE bringing a full team! Our last rider just won't be born in a few more years."
 
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This is your (ir)regular scheduled weird RedheadDane observation!

I bring to you the amazing tale of Is Erik Fetter Going to Attend?

First, this happened:

25/04addedFETTER Erik

All good, right? Not an unreasonable time to start finalising your roster. Or so you'd think! Because shortly afterwards this happened:

27/04removedFETTER Erik

Okay, they (PCS) made a mistake, turns out he isn't going to ride after all. Or...

29/04addedFETTER Erik

And now finally, just to hammer it home, this seems to be the final verdict:

03/05removedFETTER Erik11h
03/05removedFETTER Erik11h

But at least he isn't three-years-old!
 
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Which riders can expect to create action and attack if they are in top form? Yates, Bernal and Evenepoel are obvious, but who else?

Will riders like Buchmann, Hindley, Carthy, Vlasov and Almeida be offensive and attack if they are in form and have the legs to do it? Almeida seemed more like a "reactive" than a "proactive" riders last Giro. Can't say that I've seen Buchmann attack many times either. Carthy and Vlasov are perhaps a bit more offensive?
 
First case: "Yes, he's doing the race on a tricycle. Yes, he needs to stop and have a nap every stage. Yes, he's being pretty slow, but he will get through!"

Second case: "We ARE bringing a full team! Our last rider just won't be born in a few more years."
I should have added that I knew those inclusions on the list were likely to be erroneous. The scenarios you describe did not occur.
 
Which riders can expect to create action and attack if they are in top form? Yates, Bernal and Evenepoel are obvious, but who else?

Will riders like Buchmann, Hindley, Carthy, Vlasov and Almeida be offensive and attack if they are in form and have the legs to do it? Almeida seemed more like a "reactive" than a "proactive" riders last Giro. Can't say that I've seen Buchmann attack many times either. Carthy and Vlasov are perhaps a bit more offensive?
Carthy is a very offensive rider when in shape, even in GTs. Not quite sure about Vlasov since he has basically never ridden a GT for GC (he attacked a few times during Vuelta 2020, but he was already 5 minutes behind after a couple of stage if I remember correctly).
 
Carthy is a very offensive rider when in shape, even in GTs. Not quite sure about Vlasov since he has basically never ridden a GT for GC (he attacked a few times during Vuelta 2020, but he was already 5 minutes behind after a couple of stage if I remember correctly).
For me the main question mark with Vlasov is altitude. The only time we've really seen him on a climb at altitude was in the Österreich-Rundfahrt 2 years ago, when he lost 1:25 to Hermans on the Großglockner. 2 days later he won on the Kitzbüheler Horn, so his form was apparently fine.
 
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