Has Actovegin fallen out of favor?

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Feb 23, 2010
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Cloxxki said:
I seem to remember the Russian was also hauling around IV equipment. So claiming he was just going to drink the stuff may not have held up there.
Is EPO allowed for oral use?

Since when is a substance only banned based on selected modes of administration? If it's forbidden for IV, can I get away with carrying a bottle of the stuff to a race, as long as I don't have a needle on me?
I think this is all because the authorities are unconvinced that there is any clear benefit to the product as a PED. That said, nobody wants to open up a grey area where technically legal Actovegin could be used as an excuse for possession or use of IV equipment.
 
Mar 19, 2009
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L'arriviste said:
I think this is all because the authorities are unconvinced that there is any clear benefit to the product as a PED. That said, nobody wants to open up a grey area where technically legal Actovegin could be used as an excuse for possession or use of IV equipment.
Synefrine was also taking off the list once. Not sure of its status today. It DOES do ephedrine-like things to you though, if you're susceptible for it.
Anecdotal: I didn't seem to respond (tried it when of the list), a friend just got heart racings and subsequent insomia thus quit it, and his friend in fact just easily lost good weight with it, no issues.

It seems more efficient to put resources towards developing tests for all suspect drugs, rather than to decide whether or not to allow them. It's an unnecessary drug, it's articial, THUS it's prohibited.
 
Cloxxki said:
I seem to remember the Russian was also hauling around IV equipment. So claiming he was just going to drink the stuff may not have held up there.
Is EPO allowed for oral use?

Since when is a substance only banned based on selected modes of administration? If it's forbidden for IV, can I get away with carrying a bottle of the stuff to a race, as long as I don't have a needle on me?
Um... caffeine (direct muscle injection).

I am sure that there are others. (e.g. topical cortisone not banned...)

Don't get me wrong python, I am normally a supporter. But I have a difference of opinion here.

Dave.
 
Sep 25, 2009
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Cloxxki said:
Since when is a substance only banned based on selected modes of administration?
despite several examples, you got it backwards.

it's the mode of administration - inter-vinous injection - that's banned. NOT the substance.

you take the orange juice intravenously, or plain water or actovegin and you are automatically banned.

actovegin is available in tablets. you can stuff your face all day long with acotovegin tablets and wada would not care. they don't consider it banned just like water.

why is it so complicated ?
 
Mar 19, 2009
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python said:
despite several examples, you got it backwards.

it's the mode of administration - inter-vinous injection - that's banned. NOT the substance.

you take the orange juice intravenously, or plain water or actovegin and you are automatically banned.

actovegin is available in tablets. you can stuff your face all day long with acotovegin tablets and wada would not care. they don't consider it banned just like water.

why is it so complicated ?
Yeah OK.
So if it shows up in my ****, and I take some pills out of my jersey pocket, and make a stupid face, I'm good to go?

Problem. If it doesn't work orally, then when it shows up in your urine or blood, should you not have a really good reason to be taking it orally as you'll claim? Uselessly taking meds, even orally, does that make sense?
Cafffeine is a commodity. Most people won't even start their day without it. But Actovegin...it seems we can state that if an athlete uses it, it's to go faster. And if they want to use it for that, they'll certainly take it IV. So, might as well ban it for showing up in samples, presuming its IV administration, unless very well documented by an independant physician, accedited by WADA.
 
Sep 25, 2009
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Cloxxki said:
Yeah OK.
So if it shows up in my ****, and I take some pills out of my jersey pocket, and make a stupid face, I'm good to go?

Problem. If it doesn't work orally, then when it shows up in your urine or blood, should you not have a really good reason to be taking it orally as you'll claim? Uselessly taking meds, even orally, does that make sense?
Cafffeine is a commodity. Most people won't even start their day without it. But Actovegin...it seems we can state that if an athlete uses it, it's to go faster. And if they want to use it for that, they'll certainly take it IV. So, might as well ban it for showing up in samples, presuming its IV administration, unless very well documented by an independant physician, accedited by WADA.
i can't understand why people feel wada must operate by the rules they hear in anecdotes in stead of relying on their own research.

true, wada has plenty of problems and has at times been responsible for complicating things instead of solving and moving along...but in the case of actovegin they said clearly - 'we monitor it but don't consider it banned at present'.

what misinformed athletes believe and chose to put in their bodies is no different than some aging misinformed dude or dudess deciding to do with 'alternative medicine'.

peloton has it's own long tales and myths. they could be just fads that the better informed and professionally advised top cheaters have given up on long ago.

actovegin apears to be one of them, as the notorious user of doping products - joe papp - told us in the very thread.
 
Sep 25, 2009
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Merckx index said:
So only intra-vinous injections are banned, not say, intra-contadrus, intra-schleckus or intra-bassus?

Edit: Ah, sorry, Cobbles, I didn't mean to intravine, I mean intervene.
this is your most 'scientific' input to date. congratulations.
 
Mar 10, 2009
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Actovegin was just in the news

Canadian Doctor Tied to Professional Athletes Guilty of Drug Charge

The drugs at the center of the plea agreement included human growth hormone, which the plea agreement said was not approved in the United States for the uses that were intended by Galea, and Actovegin, a derivative of calf’s blood not sanctioned for use in this country.
[...]

With regard to the plea, Galea, who is not licensed to practice medicine in the United States, admitted to traveling to 13 locations — including New York City, Miami, Washington and Boston — to administer four different treatments. The document said one of the treatments involved injecting athletes with a cocktail containing H.G.H. and a second kind entailed injections of Actovegin.
 

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