How The Pro's Defeat The Anti Doping System

Dec 5, 2009
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Read away at my new blog post. LINK.

Much courtesy to Joe Papp. I hope this will be a step in educating the "masses". Comments, questions and other insights are welcome at the blog. If you know any more "escape tactics" that will be keeping in line with the subject of the post, please add it as a comment below the post. That will be doing your part to, well, consider it a mission to educate.
 
Mar 10, 2009
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Well, Withnail & I is a great movie...

Good read.

Look, the game is ALWAYS the same: how to get away with it. As long as you have willing participants, they will take their chances for a better outcome than if they simply play by the rules.

The mentality hasn't changed either:

1) The rules are for everyone else.

2) I'll only do it when I need to.

3) It's not like I'm hurting anyone else.


Cycling cheats are no different than addicts. Denial is their only friend.
 
Dec 5, 2009
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Thanks for the comments so far, like I said Joe helped write most of it and I played a small part in bringing it out to the public.

There was an interesting comment for the post in my email today. It went like this :

"Great article. And Geologyjoe, with the article's final reference to fraud and embezzlement, I've been thinking of the economic flowchart behind a winner's paycheck. Isn't money from the pockets of spectators going into that big pie or am I wrong? (Ive not been to a watch a major pro race) If the public is paying for the doping 'circus' in town, and if they don't mind drug fueled entertainment, so be it. But from the majority of people talking against it, there must be a sign of morality in there somewhere. People have been disturbed with this in cycling for a long time."

I can't answer this comprehensively enough. What factors are exactly contributing to a winner's paycheck apart from sponsors payout and such? Is there a slice of public money in there from ticket sales and so on? (I'm thinking of a track race where people buy tickets to get into the velodrome but I also can't see how it is "free" for someone to stand at the barriers near the finish line of say the Tour de France? How much do you have to pay to get that privilege?
 
Apr 1, 2009
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Thanks for the post Cozy Beehive, sadly i cant access the link at work as its denied. My laptop is on the blink at home also. Is there any chance you could send on the text by pm to me if possible? I would really be interested in reading the article.

Many thanks,

Kerbdog.
 
Dec 5, 2009
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Alternative sources

Kerbdog said:
Thanks for the post Cozy Beehive, sadly i cant access the link at work as its denied. My laptop is on the blink at home also. Is there any chance you could send on the text by pm to me if possible? I would really be interested in reading the article.

Many thanks,

Kerbdog.

1. Individual I know uploaded the article on Scribd which can be accessed here. You can also download it. http://www.scribd.com/doc/24951496/How-Cycling-Pro-s-Defeat-Anti-Doping-Control

2. You can read my feed if just the blog site is blocked. http://feeds.feedburner.com/blogspot/CB

3. You can read my blog on your cell phone. This site explains how to send it to your cell phone. Just put in your phone number in the space provided. http://cbmobile.mofuse.mobi/

I'm not recommending you violate office IT rules or anything, ofcourse :)
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Cozy Beehive said:
Thanks for the comments so far, like I said Joe helped write most of it and I played a small part in bringing it out to the public.

There was an interesting comment for the post in my email today. It went like this :



I can't answer this comprehensively enough. What factors are exactly contributing to a winner's paycheck apart from sponsors payout and such? Is there a slice of public money in there from ticket sales and so on? (I'm thinking of a track race where people buy tickets to get into the velodrome but I also can't see how it is "free" for someone to stand at the barriers near the finish line of say the Tour de France? How much do you have to pay to get that privilege?

Surely most of it comes from fans' pockets.

Salaries: From company sponsors. Sponsors who make their money from the public and only do it for advertising, which must generate more income otherwise they wouldn't do it. Also from merchandising. Again, public money.

Prize money: I would assume again from the sponsors, which are companies etc, and from merchandising, as above.

Maybe there are some rich benefactors out there, but I doubt it. Of course, LA is one. His "donations" to the UCI must be being distributed somewhere.

Maybe the link between doping and public money should be highlighted more. Then maybe there'll be less of the public ignoring it.
 
Mar 19, 2009
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tifosa said:
Well, Withnail & I is a great movie...

Good read.

Look, the game is ALWAYS the same: how to get away with it. As long as you have willing participants, they will take their chances for a better outcome than if they simply play by the rules.

The mentality hasn't changed either:

1) The rules are for everyone else.

2) I'll only do it when I need to.

3) It's not like I'm hurting anyone else.


Cycling cheats are no different than addicts. Denial is their only friend.
Not less than a few of them dont experience denial. ;)
 
Jul 16, 2009
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love the post Cozy- took a read at your blog- will entertain me in future!

check out Joe Papp's interview on Pez as well- open and honest
 
Jul 5, 2009
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Cozy Beehive said:
Thanks for the comments so far, like I said Joe helped write most of it and I played a small part in bringing it out to the public.

There was an interesting comment for the post in my email today. It went like this :



I can't answer this comprehensively enough. What factors are exactly contributing to a winner's paycheck apart from sponsors payout and such? Is there a slice of public money in there from ticket sales and so on? (I'm thinking of a track race where people buy tickets to get into the velodrome but I also can't see how it is "free" for someone to stand at the barriers near the finish line of say the Tour de France? How much do you have to pay to get that privilege?


The largest connection to the public is that the race invariably takes place on public roads, and that means that at various levels the community has to sponsor or support the race. Everything from road closure permits to police presence and medical support to volunteers. That's also why it's free to attend! But you are also being bombarded by the corporate sponsors.

The analogy that keeps coming to mind is network TV. The networks use public airwaves (they secure a portion of the spectrum) to provide "free" content to anyone willing to accept exposure to corporate messages (i.e., commercials).

In both cases, the actors and riders do not directly derive their income from the public. But without the use of public property, there would be no way for the race or programming to exist.

It's that connection that allows public participation in debate, I think. We own the public spaces these people race in. We have a stake in the what happens.

If all this happens in a private velodrome where people have to pay admission, then I think that the public has a direct connection to the rider's salary and can vote with their dollars by packing the place or not attending.

Just my opinion.

John Swanson
 
Dec 5, 2009
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ScienceIsCool said:
The largest connection to the public is that the race invariably takes place on public roads, and that means that at various levels the community has to sponsor or support the race. Everything from road closure permits to police presence and medical support to volunteers. That's also why it's free to attend! But you are also being bombarded by the corporate sponsors.

The analogy that keeps coming to mind is network TV. The networks use public airwaves (they secure a portion of the spectrum) to provide "free" content to anyone willing to accept exposure to corporate messages (i.e., commercials).

In both cases, the actors and riders do not directly derive their income from the public. But without the use of public property, there would be no way for the race or programming to exist.

It's that connection that allows public participation in debate, I think. We own the public spaces these people race in. We have a stake in the what happens.

If all this happens in a private velodrome where people have to pay admission, then I think that the public has a direct connection to the rider's salary and can vote with their dollars by packing the place or not attending.

Just my opinion.

John Swanson

John,

Excellent views there. I understand what you're saying but say I want to watch the Tour de France and want to stand beside the barricades near to the finish line . How much would I have to pay to get that position and is some of that money indirectly going into the prize money pie? [Obviously I have to fly there first , either way I can't afford it :D ]
 

Polish

BANNED
Mar 11, 2009
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Old School

This may be a little before your time, Cozy, but my all-time favorite way for a Pro to avoid detection by the Anti Doping System was by jumping out of the hotel window...

Classic!
 
Dec 5, 2009
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Polish said:
This may be a little before your time, Cozy, but my all-time favorite way for a Pro to avoid detection by the Anti Doping System was by jumping out of the hotel window...

Classic!

Who was that? What a disgraceful bag of bones he was. :)
 
Aug 13, 2009
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Cozy Beehive said:
Who was that? What a disgraceful bag of bones he was. :)

It has happened a few times. One of the more comic times was before the Maratona dles Dolomites. The police raided the room of a group of 50-60 year old amateurs. One of the 55 year old guys jumps off the balcony and runs into the hills. The found a wide variety of dope in the guys room
 
Dec 5, 2009
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Race Radio said:
It has happened a few times. One of the more comic times was before the Maratona dles Dolomites. The police raided the room of a group of 50-60 year old amateurs. One of the 55 year old guys jumps off the balcony and runs into the hills. The found a wide variety of dope in the guys room

Interesting. Makes for a funny drama. I can imagine the dum bloke telling the others "make sure you don't tell them I'm hiding in the hills" :D

On a serious note, if he jumped out and fled, he probably knew very well he was not doing the right thing.
 
Jun 19, 2009
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Cozy Beehive said:
Read away at my new blog post. LINK.

Much courtesy to Joe Papp. I hope this will be a step in educating the "masses". Comments, questions and other insights are welcome at the blog. If you know any more "escape tactics" that will be keeping in line with the subject of the post, please add it as a comment below the post. That will be doing your part to, well, consider it a mission to educate.

Thanks and really good reference for the unwashed believers. The Bribery Option is the most interesting because once it is successful the rider also has the goods on the operatives. Unless a whistleblower actually manages to have some certified sample; he/she couldn't prove the rider did anything. I wonder if clean riders have ever been strong-armed into paying for such a service because the Controllers were extortionists. Joe?
 
Oldman said:
...The Bribery Option is the most interesting because once it is successful the rider also has the goods on the operatives. Unless a whistleblower actually manages to have some certified sample; he/she couldn't prove the rider did anything. I wonder if clean riders have ever been strong-armed into paying for such a service because the Controllers were extortionists. Joe?

Hi.

In answer to your question, I know of it happening on at least two occasions involving three different clean riders, at the same race in subsequent years, with the same extortionist on the "official" side.

Best,

Joe
 
Dec 5, 2009
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Oldman said:
Thanks and really good reference for the unwashed believers. The Bribery Option is the most interesting because once it is successful the rider also has the goods on the operatives. Unless a whistleblower actually manages to have some certified sample; he/she couldn't prove the rider did anything. I wonder if clean riders have ever been strong-armed into paying for such a service because the Controllers were extortionists. Joe?

Oldman,

Joe replied to your question :

"Hi.

In answer to your question, I know of it happening on at least two occasions involving three different clean riders, at the same race in subsequent years, with the same extortionist on the "official" side.

Best,

Joe"
 
joe_papp said:
Hi.

In answer to your question, I know of it happening on at least two occasions involving three different clean riders, at the same race in subsequent years, with the same extortionist on the "official" side.

This is interesting.

The guy who ran the old cyclingheroes website used to post a lot on cyclingforums. He used to have great connections and content. In not so many words, he alluded to widescale extortion of teams.

Whatever happened to cyclingheroes? It looks like he converted to purely a cycling photography service.
 
Race Radio said:
It has happened a few times. One of the more comic times was before the Maratona dles Dolomites. The police raided the room of a group of 50-60 year old amateurs. One of the 55 year old guys jumps off the balcony and runs into the hills. The found a wide variety of dope in the guys room

I get this picture in my mind of the mafia leadership meeting in Apalachin, New York in 1957. When the gangsters spotted police, they fled the house, running through the woods in their suits and tossing guns and money as they went. For weeks afterward, locals found bank notes littering the woods.