Interesting article from The Independent regarding Gene Doping

Feb 18, 2013
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http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/general/others/the-cheat-gene-could-the-next-step-in-sporting-fraud-come-from-manipulating-dna-8073605.html

I'd rather this thread not degenerate into the usual Sky/Froome bashing if possible, but might we be looking at part of the problem here?

It could potentially explain a lot - similar to the way that the early adopters of EPO were ET's and completely undetectable - if there were a team or teams that were ahead of the curve in this perspective, then they would definitely have a major advantage.

There's probably been umpteen threads on this already, but I guess what I found most interesting is that it has reached main-stream press.
 
Jul 17, 2012
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The enhanced genes increased the muscle strength of the mice by 30 per cent or more, enabling them to run for faster and longer on treadmills compared with ordinary mice.

Dr Sweeney was almost immediately swamped by enquiries from athletes who wanted to get their hands on the technology
I lolled

Good article, sounds like the tech is in it's embryonic stages, at least officially. Would be interesting to find out if there were any 'experiments' out there.
 
Sep 22, 2009
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I remember reading about Sweeney a few years back. The quotes are old, there's nothing new in this article, but this subject is worthy of talk. Scary stuff
 
Jul 21, 2012
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JimmyFingers said:
I lolled

Good article, sounds like the tech is in it's embryonic stages, at least officially. Would be interesting to find out if there were any 'experiments' out there.
 
May 7, 2009
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"....Dr Sweeney was almost immediately swamped by enquiries from athletes who wanted to get their hands on the technology....."



WOW :eek:
 
Deagol said:
"....Dr Sweeney was almost immediately swamped by enquiries from athletes who wanted to get their hands on the technology....."



WOW :eek:
Yup, makes you wonder... I do get the feeling that gene doping will really divide the peloton in two sections. I think there will be/ is a fair amount of guys not willing to go that far.
 
Mar 16, 2013
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LaFlorecita said:
Yup, makes you wonder... I do get the feeling that gene doping will really divide the peloton in two sections. I think there will be/ is a fair amount of guys not willing to go that far.
I disagree. IMO, it will homogenize the peloton. Those not willing "to go that far" won't make the cut, just like in the "EPO era". The difference is that society is going to be OK with it because we are all going to do it soon enough. When it starts happening nobody is going to want to be left behind.

The implications extend well beyond sport. A genetic revolution is on the immediate horizon and people are worried about how it might effect bike races: :eek:
 
Aug 20, 2013
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heart_attack_man said:
http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/general/others/the-cheat-gene-could-the-next-step-in-sporting-fraud-come-from-manipulating-dna-8073605.html

I'd rather this thread not degenerate into the usual Sky/Froome bashing if possible, but might we be looking at part of the problem here?

It could potentially explain a lot - similar to the way that the early adopters of EPO were ET's and completely undetectable - if there were a team or teams that were ahead of the curve in this perspective, then they would definitely have a major advantage.

There's probably been umpteen threads on this already, but I guess what I found most interesting is that it has reached main-stream press.
What would make this illegal by today's rules?
(That is not a challenge as I have not read all of today's or WADA rules - just wondering)
 
Jan 20, 2013
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It doesn't have to become reality and if it does there may be unknown side effects. If we have a lot of riders dropping dead there may be some genetic passports or tests implemented to counteract any such developments.

The arms race does not end here. What is presently considered impossible to detect will soon be outscienced by science. Dawg or no Dawg.:)
 
May 7, 2009
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even if the tech is a ways off, the fact that the doctor was swamped by athletes inquiries speaks to the ethics (or lack thereof) in athletes themselves. This doesn't paint a pretty picture of honesty in sport.
 
The enhanced genes increased the muscle strength of the mice by 30 per cent or more, enabling them to run for faster and longer on treadmills compared with ordinary mice.

Dr Sweeney was almost immediately swamped by enquiries from athletes who wanted to get their hands on the technology
 
Nov 26, 2012
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Deagol said:
even if the tech is a ways off, the fact that the doctor was swamped by athletes inquiries speaks to the ethics (or lack thereof) in athletes themselves. This doesn't paint a pretty picture of honesty in sport.
In the world of win-or-lose, when was ethics important?

My worry is:
In the same year, the Salk Institute in California demonstrated how genes and environment can interact in unexpected ways to enhance athletic performance by taking drugs that can "turbocharge" specific performance-enhancing genes.
There are old texts of traditional martial arts, where performance-enhancing powders were mentioned. These researchers might have stumbled on one chemical that worked for the mice.

Do the anti-doping agencies spend enough on R&D?
 
Zorotheslacker said:
What would make this illegal by today's rules?
(That is not a challenge as I have not read all of today's or WADA rules - just wondering)
It's already prohibited under WADA code:

M3. GENE DOPING
The following, with the potential to enhance sport performance, are prohibited:
1. The transfer of polymers of nucleic acids or nucleic acid analogues;
2. The use of normal or genetically modified cells.


Detection of course is another thing entirely.
 

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