Is EPO currently being used at Major tours

Oct 1, 2020
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Obviously EPO was rampant through the 90’s and in the first decade of the 2000’s.

That said famously the time that won the Alpe D’Huez in 2011 would have earned a 40th place finish in 2001 so I think it’s fair to say the sport was relatively clean at that point.

I understand my opening paragraph is like explaining 1 + 1 = 2 to the regulars on here.

My question is, do you think EPO is currently being used at Major tours like the Tour De France, Giro Italia etc. If yes, to what extent, as much as in the Armstrong era?
 
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Oct 1, 2020
3
1
515
Is that that crap Tyler Hamilton claimed in that book of his but which, when checked against reality, was found to be total toss?
Are you implying it’s been used constantly since 1990? Can you give a serious response? How do you explain the Alpe D’Huez result in 2011 if EPO wasn’t being used?
 
Are you implying it’s been used constantly since 1990? Can you give a serious response? How do you explain the Alpe D’Huez result in 2011 if EPO wasn’t being used?
I think you’d be best served by searching for the various threads with EPO or “blood” in the titles. There is an immense amount of information loaded in them, more than you’ll ever have time to read.

However, the brief answer is “Yes”
 
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Are you implying it’s been used constantly since 1990? Can you give a serious response? How do you explain the Alpe D’Huez result in 2011 if EPO wasn’t being used?
Can't read, won't read.

You're not seeking the truth, you just want affirmation, why else rely on a complete fabrication for your argument and then get upset when called out on it?
 
I think you’d be best served by searching for the various threads with EPO or “blood” in the titles. There is an immense amount of information loaded in them, more than you’ll ever have time to read.

However, the brief answer is “Yes”
I agree, but I think its worthwhile resurrecting the subject since as per your bolded comment, who has the time to trawl back through the various threads with EPO or “blood” in the titles (not me) ?

Alpe times during the TdF are an excellent reference point for the level of doping in the peloton. In my opinion the peloton and the team doctors simply evolved to the rules. A bit like Formula 1 racing. The 2011 TdF (~42 minutes) is a great reference point for when the peloton was cleanest before the arms race recommenced. Also the 2010 TdF seemed obviously slower than 2009. But Alpe times are still not approaching the incredible records set by Marco Pantani in the 90s on a slower and heavier bike (sub 37 minutes). I doubt even Pogacar would get close whatever he is using.

Doctors have learned how to manipulate rider blood profiles to optimize oxygen transfer and not trigger an adverse result on the UCI passport. It think what has been discussed is EPO micro dosing is still possible and is still being done.
 
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I doubt even Pogacar would get close whatever he is using.
According to my estimates a time of about 38 minutes would be possible for peak Pogacar (assuming 3-4% drop of performance vs his 20-25 minute VAM on 8% climbs) and probably under 38 minutes in case of a TT. So around peak Armstrong times with only Pantani significantly better. Contador of 2009 would likely have been able to achieve similar time as well. These two have been the best candidates to get closer to EPO era Alpe records.
 
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According to my estimates a time of about 38 minutes would be possible for peak Pogacar (assuming 3-4% drop of performance vs his 20-25 minute VAM) and probably under 38 minutes in case of a TT. So around peak Armstrong times with only Pantani significantly better. Contador of 2009 would likely have been able to achieve similar time as well.
Yes, I'd agree with your estimates for Pogi and Contador 2009. But again Schleck and Contador 2010 weren't at that level. 2008 was another low point like 2011. Then a big step up in 2009.
 
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Disagree. Alpe is always raced hard. Even Thomas 2018 didn’t break 40 minutes despite being pulled from the bottom by the Sky train then launching from the front in the closing kms.
Thomas was pulled from the bottom but then Nibali crashed and the front group with Dumoulin, Bardet etc stalled. There were a few attacks but they only really got going in the final km or less.
Nibali himself finished only 13 seconds down despite crashing and having a broken vertebrae.
 
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