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Nov 9, 2009
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When my left foot is on the upstroke I have a distinct dead spot where muscle tension is lost, I can look down and clearly see that all is not well. Also when putting a sustained effort in I get 'some' knee pain in the same leg (especially when consciously pedalling full circle). A higher cadence reduces the dead spot but not the pain.

I've returned to cycling after 15 years off the bike and have previously never had knee problems or a problem with pedalling squares. New pedals with float haven't made any difference to either problem.

I'm thinking that the dead spot might just be due to having a weaker left leg, not tested this theory yet and was thinking of doing some leg press tests in the gym?

Any other ideas about resolving either of these probs?
 
Jul 4, 2009
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How about leg length? Have you been measured and had shims added to the shorter leg? In our youth, we have a lot more flexibility and length problems are not as big of an issue.

Other odd things that I found in my life were simple environmental issues, I started to have problems with my left leg after college. I thought it was leg length, seat positioning, over training, etc. but the problem was I driving to work everyday and pushing in my clutch a couple of hundred times more then my leg was use to.
 
Mar 12, 2009
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Powercranks. Best. Marketing. Hype. Ever.

As Alex suggested, go to a good bike fitter, a really good one. Not some guy who just looks at you on the bike and say "ehhhh, close enough."

I've only had experience with Retul and that seemed pretty good for ironing out the kinks. They should be able to identify any leg length issue or any issues with your pedalling action overall.