Mark Padun- Made it Ma, Top of the world

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Padun did mention that he had trouble with his weight and if you could replay the interview you can see his profile picture looks like the face of a guy 20 to 30 pounds heavier than he looked from the camera motorbike. He may have the problem some riders have that when they aren't in training or comeptition they can gain a lot of weight. I think he also said something pertaining to learning about dieting habits. He may have already had the power to sustain these type of results but not the discipline to keep his weight in check. I hope this is the answer and I think it is but we will see in the future. He seems like a really good kid and hope he can be at or near the top however that may be whether that is stage hunting, General Classification 1 week or GTs or even if he can do well on One Day races or the ability to be a Dom or a super Domestique(sp).
I wrote this in the Daupihne thread and wanted to share on his own thread. Of course this is speculation and I hope things go well for him.
 
It certainly doesn't sound like 2020 has been an easy year for him [quote from his winner interview Saturday]:

"After the last year I was thinking that maybe cycling is not my sport. It's incredible. I want to thank Jesus and thank my team who believed in me and who didn't tell me stop and wait for Jack. They just let me go for the victory and I'm thankful for them for this."
 
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Padun's problem since turning pro was not reaching a high level on occasional days. His stage win in TotA as a neo pro was already very telling about his talent, as was his ride in the Hammer Series. But he was never consistent.

In 2019 he started his season very late, did nothing until Adriatica Ionica where suddenly he was the best climber in the race. Who followed him automatically assumed he would show that climbing level in the Vuelta, possibly even fighting for a top10 in the GC. But he was nowhere apart from a couple (unsuccessful) breaks.

2020 was a tough year for many. Even so his ride in the Nove Colli stage in the Giro was absolutely incredible considering he did nothing else the whole year. The mechanical prevented him from fighting for the stage win but he looked like a man on a mission that day.

All those things considered I started to view him as a Thomas De Gendt type of rider, someone who could genuinely be a top climber on few selected days and then relax in the bunch or work for teammates for most of the year.
So being arguably the best climber on consecutive days in a very competitive Dauphine is a very big surprise to me and I don't know what to expect from him at the Tour: the ceiling is certainly very high.
 
Padun's problem since turning pro was not reaching a high level on occasional days. His stage win in TotA as a neo pro was already very telling about his talent, as was his ride in the Hammer Series. But he was never consistent.

In 2019 he started his season very late, did nothing until Adriatica Ionica where suddenly he was the best climber in the race. Who followed him automatically assumed he would show that climbing level in the Vuelta, possibly even fighting for a top10 in the GC. But he was nowhere apart from a couple (unsuccessful) breaks.

2020 was a tough year for many. Even so his ride in the Nove Colli stage in the Giro was absolutely incredible considering he did nothing else the whole year. The mechanical prevented him from fighting for the stage win but he looked like a man on a mission that day.

All those things considered I started to view him as a Thomas De Gendt type of rider, someone who could genuinely be a top climber on few selected days and then relax in the bunch or work for teammates for most of the year.
So being arguably the best climber on consecutive days in a very competitive Dauphine is a very big surprise to me and I don't know what to expect from him at the Tour: the ceiling is certainly very high.
He was the best u23 rider riding for an Italian team (besides Riabushenko) during his last year in the u23 ranks. The guy almost won the Giro della Valle d'Aosta at the age of 20 against Frankiny and Mas who are older than him. He was always talented, but getting 2 wins like this against this kind of competition is surely a big surprise.
If I remember correctly he had knee problems/a knee injury early on in 2019.
 
What do you think they have been doing?
I don’t think they are doing anything illegal but I wonder who are Bahrain’s performance Physios because it seems their riders step up their performances above what I was expecting. Those 2 stages at Critérium du Dauphine were mind blowing, he was clearly one step above some of the best climbers in the business, sure that he wasn’t a threat to GC but even so...
 
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He was the best u23 rider riding for an Italian team (besides Riabushenko) during his last year in the u23 ranks. The guy almost won the Giro della Valle d'Aosta at the age of 20 against Frankiny and Mas who are older than him.
Yeah I've been follwing him closely since his u23 years. This is a rider I was 99% sure would turn into a superstar when he went pro, but his first years with Bahrain surely pointed to a different development.
 
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Is Padun the second Jan Ullrich? The German used to gain lots of kilos in the winter (nutella, jelly sweets etc) only to be reborn for the Tour. Mommy's diet is the key.
This is actually pretty normal and likely optimal method to build good form and stay healthy. Trying to stay around (low) racing weight for the whole year may be simply dangerous for heath and general well being, not to mention athletic performance. The last thing you want during demanding preparation period is chronic energy deficiency. At best it will lead to sub-optimal performance, at worst to the burnout and serious health issues, including mental.
 
This is actually pretty normal and likely optimal method to build good form and stay healthy. Trying to stay around (low) racing weight for the whole year may be simply dangerous for heath and general well being, not to mention athletic performance. The last thing you want during demanding preparation period is chronic energy deficiency. At best it will lead to sub-optimal performance, at worst to the burnout and serious health issues, including mental.
No, it's not normal what Ullrich was doing. You shouldn't gain as much as 10+ kilos. Some weight gain and rest in the off-season is healthy (as you said) and one can't be in form all-year long but he was an extreme case.
 
This is actually pretty normal and likely optimal method to build good form and stay healthy. Trying to stay around (low) racing weight for the whole year may be simply dangerous for heath and general well being, not to mention athletic performance. The last thing you want during demanding preparation period is chronic energy deficiency. At best it will lead to sub-optimal performance, at worst to the burnout and serious health issues, including mental.
I'm a bit worried when it comes to u23 or even junior riders trying to stay super lean year round, those kids are often the first to burn out. Then you also have scumbags like Locatelli, who fat shame their riders for eating ice cream...
In the u23 ranks Padun raaced 1 year for Palazzago/Locatelli and 2 years for Colpack. Both of those team are kinda known for trying to squeeze as many wins as possible out of their riders while they are with them, getting them ready to be pros isn't their nr. 1 priority. Besides the guys who are part o the Italian track cycling team and worked with those coaches (Ganna and Consonni are good examples) the only Colpack guy who has lived up to the expectations has been Ciccone.
 
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In the u23 ranks Padun raaced 1 year for Palazzago/Locatelli and 2 years for Colpack. Both of those team are kinda known for trying to squeeze as many wins as possible out of their riders while they are with them, getting them ready to be pros isn't their nr. 1 priority. Besides the guys who are part o the Italian track cycling team and worked with those coaches (Ganna and Consonni are good examples) the only Colpack guy who has lived up to the expectations has been Ciccone.
Perhaps things are changing a bit though. Both Bagioli and Covi have some good results in their first years among the pros, Tiberi is also developing nicely.
 
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Perhaps things are changing a bit though. Both Bagioli and Covi have some good results in their first years among the pros, Tiberi is also developing nicely.
Ass far as I know Tiberi has been coached by someone provided to him by the Italian National team since he was a junior.
I hope that things are changing, but you know how old fashioned Italians can be when they've alsways done something a certain way...
 
He was IMO the best gc prospect riding for an Italian team in the U23 ranks.
And what does it mean in terms of overall ability within U23, not just a particular subset or riders?

Result-wise he was good, but not a very likely future world-beater in Avenir and U23 Peace Race. Even his results Italy look good, but not necessarily great, but here I am not sure about the various internal factors, so I'll take your word for it.
 
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And what does it mean in terms of overall ability within U23, not just a particular subset or riders?

Result-wise he was good, but not a very likely future world-beater in Avenir and U23 Peace Race. Even his results Italy look good, but not necessarily great, but here I am not sure about the various internal factors, so I'll take your word for it.
He only raced the Tour de L'Avenir once, as a first year u23 rider and also finished 8th in the u23 Peace race as a first year u23 rider (one year after he finished 10th in the junior version of the race).
Look at the top 15 of the Giro della Valle d'Aosta where he finished 3rd, that was a stacked field. The main difference between him and the top 3 in the U23 Giro was his rather poor TT.
He also "won" the Fleche du Sud (after Kvasina had some clinic stuff related problems) before turning pro.
 
He only raced the Tour de L'Avenir once, as a first year u23 rider and also finished 8th in the u23 Peace race as a first year u23 rider (one year after he finished 10th in the junior version of the race).
Look at the top 15 of the Giro della Valle d'Aosta where he finished 3rd, that was a stacked field. The main difference between him and the top 3 in the U23 Giro was his rather poor TT.
He also "won" the Fleche du Sud (after Kvasina had some clinic stuff related problems) before turning pro.
Well yes, but it is possible to get some idea of how good a rider might be based on limited results. Arensman and Power finished on the Avenir podium as first year U23. Of course, people mature at different rates, but 48th is not much to write home about.

8th in the U23 Peace race is much better, but it doesn't exactly scream future best climber in the Dauphine. I think he was not even the youngest in the top 10.

10th as a last year junior is good, but again not more than that.

Fleche du Sud is not a mountain race so that is also not a great indication of future climbing ability.

That leaves the results in Italy. Those were probably the best, but again (my opinion only here) not outstanding.
 
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