Maxim Iglinsky positive for EPO

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Jul 11, 2013
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argyllflyer said:
More intriguingly, Valentin tested positive a few weeks after him. Difference perhaps being his immediate owning up.
Was wondering about that..
First one a warning, second a reminder... I wonder what third will be??
 
fmk_RoI said:
The test was August 1, the day before San Sebastián (where Iglinskiy was 26th) and five days after the Tour ended (where Iglinskiy was 129th).

The brother was 10 days later, August 1, the first stage of Eneco (he didn't ride either the Tour or San Seb).
What I understand about EPO is the detection window is relatively short,
several days maximum. Even then, the test isn't very good at detecting EPO.

The "lone athlete doping" story doesn't work too well here.

My crackpot theory is the UCI pulls a positive out of an endless stack of positives for strategic reasons.

And to answer the timing question, we know there are times when there are delays due to some wrangling before announcing. One athlete taking the sanction without delay while another examines options for a bit is certainly possible.
 
As Laura Weislo has just noted on Twitter, the last six provisional suspensions have all been for EPO. That's over a ten week period. Not only is six on the trot odd, but six in ten weeks is extremely odd.



There has been persistent talk of a new EPO test, with greater sensitivity, and the arrival of such a test could explain so many falling so quickly. Or old habits could just be dieing very, very hard. Or the CADF could have changed the rules and refocused their attention. Anything could be happening. Question, as always, is what?
 
Mar 14, 2009
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fmk_RoI said:
There has been persistent talk of a new EPO test, with greater sensitivity, and the arrival of such a test could explain so many falling so quickly. Or old habits could just be dieing very, very hard. Or the CADF could have changed the rules and refocused their attention. Anything could be happening. Question, as always, is what?
What are the rules/options about re-testing old(er) samples when a new test is available? I dont mean something from 10 years ago but lets say something from last 12 months?
 
fmk_RoI said:
The test was August 1, the day before San Sebastián (where Iglinskiy was 26th) and five days after the Tour ended (where Iglinskiy was 129th).
more importantly: one day before he went on to have a four weeks holiday. Raises eyebrows about all those negative tests during the Tour de France...
 
search said:
more importantly: one day before he went on to have a four weeks holiday. Raises eyebrows about all those negative tests during the Tour de France...
The logical assumption would be a (detectable) dose before San Sebastian. He wasn't that far off the pace so it clearly was a fairly successful strategy.
 
Jul 11, 2013
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Jancouver said:
What are the rules/options about re-testing old(er) samples when a new test is available? I dont mean something from 10 years ago but lets say something from last 12 months?
Up to 8 years according to the WADA code i believe..
(if not someone will surely correct me)
 
Jul 21, 2012
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argyllflyer said:
But... but... but! Didn't people stop doping in 2006?? :D
Only the brits. Eastern europe hasnt gotten the memo yet.

Not to worry, these EPO positives proves that EPO makes you a worse rider since clean riders are much faster than these nobodies.
 
Jancouver said:
What are the rules/options about re-testing old(er) samples when a new test is available? I dont mean something from 10 years ago but lets say something from last 12 months?
Only two things to stop it:

1) the samples were never stored (they are only stored for some races and for varying periods of time, not always up to the SoL); and
2) the willingness of the authorities to look backwards (ignore what they say about being willing to look back and judge them on the times they have actually revisited the past).
 
Oct 2, 2012
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DirtyWorks said:
There's no way team Astana is cast as the bad actor. It's a team funded by the last dictator in Europe. The country throws it's weight around international sports as a nation threatening trade problems in Khazakstan.
Sorry but Kazakstan is central asia. The last dictator in Europe is either Lukashenko in Bellarus or Putin, depending on your definition of Europe (and defintion of dictator), but either way Kazakstan is not European
 
fmk_RoI said:
Only two things to stop it:

1) the samples were never stored (they are only stored for some races and for varying periods of time, not always up to the SoL); and
2) the willingness of the authorities to look backwards (ignore what they say about being willing to look back and judge them on the times they have actually revisited the past).
A fun reminder was the head of IAAF howling mad in a formal press interview that USADA was able to sanction Wonderboy.

That's how the past is treated inside the IOC.
 
notrolfsorensen said:
Sorry but Kazakstan is central asia. The last dictator in Europe is either Lukashenko in Bellarus or Putin, depending on your definition of Europe (and defintion of dictator), but either way Kazakstan is not European
Bah!! Correct. Bellarus is the home to Europe's last dictator.

Here's a fun story about how even the IOC has concerns about Khazakstan.

While the Kazakhstan city has performed strongly so far and is emerging as the favourite, they have identified failure to tackle a doping problems as a factor that has impacted strongly on various failed bids in recent times.

http://www.insidethegames.biz/olympics/winter-olympics/2022/1020359-kazakhstan-claims-at-rado-conference-it-is-serious-about-tackling-doping

Apparently, a nation so tainted even the IOC has problems. And yet, it's fascinating how little we actually know about the problems.
 
Throw another Eastern european under the buss, uci are sitting on a bunch of positive samples to use when convinient, make all the anglo-saxons look squeeky clean, and the rest as dirty cheaters with no morals. Gutted though for Maxim, one of my favorite riders.
 
Nov 29, 2010
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neineinei said:
Maybe MPCC will force them to sit out Tour of Almaty.
For any other team this would be the lamest punishment ever ... but since the Tour of Almaty is by far the biggest race in Kazakhstan it would be seriously embarrassing for Astana. :D
 
deValtos said:
For any other team this would be the lamest punishment ever ... but since the Tour of Almaty is by far the biggest race in Kazakhstan it would be seriously embarrassing for Astana. :D
Not only that, but good ol' Maxim won impressively in 2013.
 
fmk_RoI said:
The test was August 1, the day before San Sebastián (where Iglinskiy was 26th) and five days after the Tour ended (where Iglinskiy was 129th).

The brother was 10 days later, August 11, the first stage of Eneco (he didn't ride either the Tour or San Seb).
Two out of contract riders trying to save themselves with some late season results.
 
May 19, 2010
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proffate said:
Not only that, but good ol' Maxim won impressively in 2013.
And as a reward for winning it Vino hired Valentin again, to keep Maxim company.

Astana is making Nibali ride Tour of Almaty, of course it is big for them. It is still a joke, and I am not sure if Nibali is crying or laughing at the prospect of maybe having to sit it out.

The MPCC rule will not come into effect until Maxim either admits guilt or is found guilty after a hearing. Valentin admitted very quickly. Some says he was spurred on by Vino. Vino might not want Maxim to be quite so quick. Maybe he will need a few days to think about it, let's say until Monday.
 
fmk_RoI said:
As Laura Weislo has just noted on Twitter, the last six provisional suspensions have all been for EPO. That's over a ten week period. Not only is six on the trot odd, but six in ten weeks is extremely odd.



There has been persistent talk of a new EPO test, with greater sensitivity, and the arrival of such a test could explain so many falling so quickly. Or old habits could just be dieing very, very hard. Or the CADF could have changed the rules and refocused their attention. Anything could be happening. Question, as always, is what?
Darbopoietin? In 2014? Jesus Christ. That was detectable before it was well-known enough to have been put on the banned list twelve years ago. Why?
DirtyWorks said:
Which, is just one reason why this is a big political move by the UCI.
Even if Astana get barred, they'll have some quasi national team with all the riders there, that's what they did last year - a bunch of Astana Kazakhs racing for the national team.
 

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