Primož Roglič

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Omertà is the word

Cycling is such a niche sport with very endogamic culture. And doping is big part of that culture, its been like that forever. When you see Riis, Matxin, Neil Stephens, etc. as WT managers (even people like Intxausti after what happened to him at Sky found a managerial role teaching the new generations...), Contador, Wiggins, Jalabert, even Santi Perez (lel) commentating on TV, a gazillion other riders with shady past working as PR for bike brands, organizing races, etc. you know its in everybody's best interest to shut up and play along. The current culture/rules rewards them for doing so. Plus lets be honest, for most these people to be part of the cycling scene is all they have. To shut up is the logical, socially accepted, profitable decision, in the current context.

What is more surprising is how riders that are somehow kicked out of the scene for breaking unwritten rules (so you would assume no economic interest anymore), they also prefer to keep it quiet, which could speak about other reasons there and what someone hinted about it being "dangerous".

To break the circle you need to change the rules that reward this behavior, period. Or else someone experiencing an epiphany moment à la Manzano :screamcat:
 
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Omertà is the word

Cycling is such a niche sport with very endogamic culture. And doping is big part of that culture, its been like that forever. When you see Riis, Matxin, Neil Stephens, etc. as WT managers (even people like Intxausti after what happened to him at Sky found a managerial role teaching the new generations...), Contador, Wiggins, Jalabert, even Santi Perez (lel) commentating on TV, a gazillion other riders with shady past working as PR for bike brands, organizing races, etc. you know its in everybody's best interest to shut up and play along. The current culture/rules rewards them for doing so. Plus lets be honest, for most these people to be part of the cycling scene is all they have. To shut up is the logical, socially accepted, profitable decision, in the current context.

What is more surprising is how riders that are somehow kicked out of the scene for breaking unwritten rules (so you would assume no economic interest anymore), they also prefer to keep it quiet, which could speak about other reasons there and what someone hinted about it being "dangerous".

To break the circle you need to change the rules that reward this behavior, period. Or else someone experiencing an epiphany moment à la Manzano :screamcat:
This is why I believe in amnesty. I know it sounds crazy and I won't say I am not. I just can't make anything else make sense when everything is a mess. Truth and reconciliation commission.

I mentioned danger as I am thinking about UAE and Bahrain being authoritarian states. Which could be potentially be dangerous for a journalist.
 
This is why I believe in amnesty. I know it sounds crazy and I won't say I am not. I just can't make anything else make sense when everything is a mess. Truth and reconciliation commission.

I mentioned danger as I am thinking about UAE and Bahrain being authoritarian states. Which could be potentially be dangerous for a journalist.
That notion was bandied about around the same time Armstrong was exposed. People here probably know more than me, but it never came to fruition.
You had a bunch of riders and sports directors admit what took place on an individual level, but my understanding is the kingpin -- i.e. Armstrong and others -- continued to carry weight by nixing the idea. Guy was not going to say everything, because quote everything probably extended past his team's doping plans.
p.s. Good point regarding UAE and Bahrain. They should never have been granted world tour status.
p.p.s. I hope I don't get suspended for stating an opinion.
 
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That notion was bandied about around the same time Armstrong was exposed. People here probably know more than me, but it never came to fruition.
You had a bunch of riders and sports directors admit what took place on an individual level, but my understanding is the kingpin -- i.e. Armstrong and others -- continued to carry weight by nixing the idea. Guy was not going to say everything, because quote everything probably extended past his team's doping plans.
p.s. Good point regarding UAE and Bahrain. They should never have been granted world tour status.
p.p.s. I hope I don't get suspended for stating an opinion.
I agree. I honestly don't think there should be teams from authoritarian states, nor races in those states. Which imo means no Hungary or Turkey either. (I don't like Almeida going to UAE)

I keep wondering about Armstrong. If there was someone above him or if he was above everyone. I could also see Armstrong being too proud and his team mates too afraid of him to speak. He's clearly in the dark triad. The question to me is only if someone above him was even more dangerous.
 
UCI & ASO?

Whatever we know about FIFA/UEFA corruption, that can be easily applied to other sports. You can pay, you are safe. Simple....
It wouldn't surprise me if UCI & ASO know what's happening at Bahrain&UAE but because of financial reasons they stay quiet.
We saw that countries from Middle East are not afraid of breaking the rules with their money in other sports. Qatar 2022 scandal and how clubs owned by guys from there break the fair-play rules makes me think the philosophy there is "no matter what we have to win".
 
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