Race Design Thread

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I wanted to make the final stage a cobbled one, but the main sector I had found turned out to have ben repaved in recent years, so it didn't work out. Instead I've decided to be boring and simply steal the one from the one from the real DT. Now I have my head filled with ideas for a Tour de France Femmes, so I couldn't be bothered to map out a route of my own.


Deutschland Tour by Samu Cuenca vol. 2

Stage 1: Vilshofen an der Donau - Pilsen/Plzeň, 240 km, approx. 4100 m of total elevation gain



Stage 2: Pilsen/Plzeň - Fichtelberg, 225 km, approx. 4500m of total elevation gain


Stage 3: Aue-Bad Schlema - Annaberg-Buchholz, 132 km, approx. 3000m of total elevation gain


Stage 4: Zschopau - Eisenach, 238 km, approx. 2100m of total elevation gain


Stage 5: Brotterode-Trusetal - Schmalkalden, 184 km, approx. 3700m of total elevation gain


Stage 6: Werneck - Neckarsulm, 131 km, approx. 1400m of total elevation gain


Stage 7: Heilbronn - Oppenau, 171 km, approx. 3800m of total elevation gain


Stage 8: Zell am Harmersbach - Zell am Harmersbach, 28 km ITT, approx. 600m of total elevation gain


Stage 9: Oppenau - Oppenau, 121 km, approx. 4100m of total elevation gain


Stage 10: Schiltach - Stuttgart, 188 km, approx. 2600-3000m of total elevation gain
 
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Stage 7- Muret-Marignac, 150km



Intermediate Sprint

Final Km’s
Starting in Muret, the first mountain battle comes today, however it’s not a big battle. In this design, I didn’t use any unknown climbs, but in my imagination this is the first time using many of the climbs, due to mine being the first edition that is two weeks. Anyway, the first 100 km’s or so are flat, with only the intermediate sprint to spice things up. However, our first climb, the Col d’Portet Aspet, is not to be taken lightly. It’s the less steep side, but the top is the steepest, featuring gradients up to

A quick decent leads us to the main attraction of the day, the Col de Mente, a proper finale for this stage, one of three stages with a decent that’s GC relevant. The climb starts from Pont de l’Oule below. Also the percentages probably are wrong on the profile, but the categorization isn

By the end of the day, we hopefully will have a proper yellow jersey, where she will have to defend it on tomorrow’s 5 climb day. The townspeople of Marignac will likely show out in droves, for the one time they host a GT stage finish.

An aerial view of Marignac
 
You know what the season after Tour de France needs? Yes, thats right, a 9 stage Tour of Germany, a similar race in terms of prestige and parcours as Tour of Switzerland, a 4th GT. That would make the absolute drought after the Tour a lot better. Similar to 2006 or thereabouts, the race was held 1 week after TdF if Im not mistaken, which could lead riders to squeeze the last form out from the Tour, Vuelta prep or simply just a race that lots of capable riders actually wanted to contest (think riders who maybe did the Giro, and is not doing the Vuelta), similar to races like Tour of Switzerland and Tour of Romandie. Or it could just be at its current location and be used to prepare for the fall classics/WCs and riders who maybe didn't feel like spending another 3 weeks chasing a high result in the GC, instead opting for the easier 9 days. Thats something I would love, and I dont like this current Tour of Germany at all.

And then we can throw Tour of Poland out with the bathwater while were at it.
Or they could have upgraded the Österreich-Rundfahrt instead of cancelling it...
 
Stage 7- Muret-Marignac, 150km



Intermediate Sprint

Final Km’s
Starting in Muret, the first mountain battle comes today, however it’s not a big battle. In this design, I didn’t use any unknown climbs, but in my imagination this is the first time using many of the climbs, due to mine being the first edition that is two weeks. Anyway, the first 100 km’s or so are flat, with only the intermediate sprint to spice things up. However, our first climb, the Col d’Portet Aspet, is not to be taken lightly. It’s the less steep side, but the top is the steepest, featuring gradients up to

A quick decent leads us to the main attraction of the day, the Col de Mente, a proper finale for this stage, one of three stages with a decent that’s GC relevant. The climb starts from Pont de l’Oule below. Also the percentages probably are wrong on the profile, but the categorization isn

By the end of the day, we hopefully will have a proper yellow jersey, where she will have to defend it on tomorrow’s 5 climb day. The townspeople of Marignac will likely show out in droves, for the one time they host a GT stage finish.

An aerial view of Marignac
It's getting interesting now!

The Porte d'Aspet-Menté combo is perhaps not that different from Petit Ballon-Platzerwasel, but the descents are harder (there are a few well-known examples of that). As far as I can see, they have never been used as the final climbs in a Tour stage previously, despite featuring many times.

And the stage is pretty long as well, so differences can certainly be made. There won't be decisive attacks before the final 40 km, so even if there's only two or and two half hours of live coverage in this future, too, we'll still be able to watch all the big moves.

Since the first week has been fairly easy so far, it might not be too hard for a first mountain stage ( at least not in this distant future). The winner of the ITT will probably still wear the yellow jersey at the start of the stage, but could easily lose it before the finish.

I also like stage 5, which could lead to an interesting battle between GC riders, stage hunters and sprinters.
 
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Stage 8- Bagneres-de-Luchon to Pla d’Adet, 107km



Intermediate Sprint

One of two Queen stages on this route is today, a 5 climb day throughout the well known Pyrenees before the finish at Pla D’Adet. First, right out of Bagneres-de-Luchon, the riders will tackle the Col de Peyresourde, a 13km climb at 6.9%

The descent leads us to the Val Louron Azet’s steeper side, with an undulating slope that doesn’t drop below 6%.

After that, a long descent leads us to the Horquette d’Ancizan, a well known climb from its longest side, where if not already, riders will be dropping like flies if the pace is high.

A short descent leads us to the shortest side of the Col d’Aspin, but an average gradient of 7% is nothing to scoff at. The climb starts from the

After that, the descent brings you to the only valley of the day, but it’s shorter than it seems, due to the stage being only 107km’s. At the foot of the last climb, the intermediate sprint will be had, and the riders will start to climb up the Pla d’Adet. The winners here include Raymond Poulidor and Joop Zoetemelk, with the latest winner here being Rafal Majka in 2014, which I have a feeling Pla d’Adet will be back in a few years, finances permitting. Anyways, this is a proper finale to the Pyrenees, which will crown a worthy yellow jersey to defend in the closing week. The only thing I didn’t like is that there is a long transfer to Nimes, but it will be doable, just not preferable.


A young Rafal Majka winning on top of Pla d’Adet
 
Stage 8- Bagneres-de-Luchon to Pla d’Adet, 107km



Intermediate Sprint

One of two Queen stages on this route is today, a 5 climb day throughout the well known Pyrenees before the finish at Pla D’Adet. First, right out of Bagneres-de-Luchon, the riders will tackle the Col de Peyresourde, a 13km climb at 6.9%

The descent leads us to the Val Louron Azet’s steeper side, with an undulating slope that doesn’t drop below 6%.

After that, a long descent leads us to the Horquette d’Ancizan, a well known climb from its longest side, where if not already, riders will be dropping like flies if the pace is high.

A short descent leads us to the shortest side of the Col d’Aspin, but an average gradient of 7% is nothing to scoff at. The climb starts from the

After that, the descent brings you to the only valley of the day, but it’s shorter than it seems, due to the stage being only 107km’s. At the foot of the last climb, the intermediate sprint will be had, and the riders will start to climb up the Pla d’Adet. The winners here include Raymond Poulidor and Joop Zoetemelk, with the latest winner here being Rafal Majka in 2014, which I have a feeling Pla d’Adet will be back in a few years, finances permitting. Anyways, this is a proper finale to the Pyrenees, which will crown a worthy yellow jersey to defend in the closing week. The only thing I didn’t like is that there is a long transfer to Nimes, but it will be doable, just not preferable.


A young Rafal Majka winning on top of Pla d’Adet
When you said 5 climbs, I certainly wasn't expecting this kind of stage.

You got possibly 3 hours of climbing and then more than an hour on top of that. And the worst riders would need another hour or more, so the time limit should probably be 30%, like on the hardest stages in the Giro Donne.

I'm going to assume that they've done this stage a few times before and have added an additional climb each time, because they found out the peloton could handle it, but many riders would probably still be looking forward to a rest day.
 
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When you said 5 climbs, I certainly wasn't expecting this kind of stage.

You got possibly 3 hours of climbing and then more than an hour on top of that. And the worst riders would need another hour or more, so the time limit should probably be 30%, like on the hardest stages in the Giro Donne.

I'm going to assume that they've done this stage a few times before and have added an additional climb each time, because they found out the peloton could handle it, but many riders would probably still be looking forward to a rest day.
Yes, they will have done a similar stage before then upped it each time. There’s only two mountain stages left with more than 1 climb, if you don’t count the final stage to tbd as a mountain stage.
 
Stage 9- Nimes to Bedoin



Intermediate Sprint

Final Km’s
A rolling day, this is one of three days in the finish of this race that the punchers can capitalize on their opportunity to shine. Nothing in the way of the riders in the first half promises a big breakaway fight, before the first categorized climb on the Col de Murs, a low gradient climb, but rates category 2 to encourage QOM hunters.

A short descent brings us to the climb of the Col de la Ligne, starting from Murs

The descent brings us to the final hill of the day, which just after the hilltop is the intermediate sprint at Blauvac, with a false flat before the final km’s in Bedoin, with your imagination open for the next stage.

Bedoin, looking at a mountain to be utilized in the next stage
 
Stage 10- Maulucène to Montagne de Lure,155 km



Intermediate Sprint

The most unrealistic stage in this Tour is here, with Mont Ventoux being a climb crested around 35kms into the stage. This could very well be a boring stage with no action until the final 5 km’s, which is the only stage like that on my course. If not, chaos will descend on the peloton, with a good 80k’s between the finish of the descent of Ventoux and the foot of the Montagne de Lure
First, we have a small starter, the Col de La Madeleine, a barely categorized climb

A short, light descent brings us to the Mont Ventoux and all its glory, 21km’s at 7.5%, at the very least the legs will severely tire.

After the descent we head north, to the Cote de Bluyes, to satisfy the climbers ahead.

The long open roads are now in the face of the riders, trudging east. However, there is a rise about 30km’s after the Cote de Bluye to try to salvage any climbers leads, before the descent and flat before our final climb, the Montagne de Lure. Used in Paris Nice and the Tour de la Provence, an esteemed climber is sure to win, with the three people who have won the day in their respective races has been Alberto Contador, Richie Porte, and Nairo Quintana.


Nairo Quintana winning here this year
 
I actually really like this as a way to make it a one-climb shootout but guarantee that legs are dead in it, a bit like a classic style Tour de Suisse stage, they used to do a lot of this /\/\/\__/ type stages to make sure the gaps were small enough for a one-week race by only being created on the final climb, but ensuring that there would be gaps by making sure legs are very tired.

I can't see ASO going for it, and I'm not sure it might be so effective in this instance once you have the colossal time gaps inevitable as a result of the Pla d'Adet stage, but as a format it's an unusual but pretty nice option.
 
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Stage 10- Maulucène to Montagne de Lure,155 km



Intermediate Sprint

The most unrealistic stage in this Tour is here, with Mont Ventoux being a climb crested around 35kms into the stage. This could very well be a boring stage with no action until the final 5 km’s, which is the only stage like that on my course. If not, chaos will descend on the peloton, with a good 80k’s between the finish of the descent of Ventoux and the foot of the Montagne de Lure
First, we have a small starter, the Col de La Madeleine, a barely categorized climb

A short, light descent brings us to the Mont Ventoux and all its glory, 21km’s at 7.5%, at the very least the legs will severely tire.

After the descent we head north, to the Cote de Bluyes, to satisfy the climbers ahead.

The long open roads are now in the face of the riders, trudging east. However, there is a rise about 30km’s after the Cote de Bluye to try to salvage any climbers leads, before the descent and flat before our final climb, the Montagne de Lure. Used in Paris Nice and the Tour de la Provence, an esteemed climber is sure to win, with the three people who have won the day in their respective races has been Alberto Contador, Richie Porte, and Nairo Quintana.


Nairo Quintana winning here this year
I also like this stage. When I read Malaucène, I feared you weren't climbing Ventoux from Bédoin, but that was luckily not the case.

You have a legendary HC climb in the beginning, where tings probably won't completely explode since it's more than 100 km from the finish, and a lesser used climb at the end, that hasn't yet been seen in the men's Tour. Montagne de Lure resembles Grand Ballon, so I think ASO could go for it as an MTF in the real race, but Ventoux probably won'f feaure in their stage.

I actually also have a stage planned for my race that has an HC climb at the start and a Cat. 1 finish, but it's shorter than yours.
 
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Stage 11- Sisteron-Gap, 140km



Intermediate Sprint

Final Km’s
A stage like this is really decided on the location it is out in the race. In this stage race, it is almost ensured to be a breakaway day, and the first stage really on a silver platter for the punchers, a golden opportunity for them when so far they only had maybe 2 chances. A lot of the climbs I couldn’t find profiles for them, which is why this write up is shorter. Anyways, it will be a shock is a team lights it up for GC, but you never know.

A look over Gap
 
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Stage 11- Sisteron-Gap, 141km



Intermediate Sprint

Final Km’s
A stage like this is really decided on the location it is out in the race. In this stage race, it is almost ensured to be a breakaway day, and the first stage really on a silver platter for the punchers, a golden opportunity for them when so far they only had maybe 2 chances. A lot of the climbs I couldn’t find profiles for them, which is why this write up is shorter. Anyways, it will be a shock is a team lights it up for GC, but you never know.

A look over Gap
Are there 2 or 3 stages left? Or 3/4, cause three hands don't normally have only 14 fingers.

This is another hard one, where the decisive attack(s) could come both early or late, depending on whether it'll be won from a break or the peloton, and/or how close the GC is beforehand (though there probably will be big gaps at this point in the race).
 
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Are there 2 or 3 stages left? Or 3/4, cause three hands don't normally have only 14 fingers.

This is another hard one, where the decisive attack(s) could come both early or late, depending on whether it'll be won from a break or the peloton, and/or how close the GC is beforehand (though there probably will be big gaps at this point in the race).
Got ourselves four stages left, I agree it is a wide open stage, where anybody who can climb a bit could conceivably win.
 
Oops, my bad:p. I guess Saturday-Sunday now.
I'm also interesting in seeing where you'll finish the race. With four remaining stages you can return to Paris (with some transfering), but you can also have a final stage which includes two ascents of La Planche des Belles Filles, the final one being a new Super-Duper beach sand road, which I assume will have been constructed in 10-20 years time.
 
I'm also interesting in seeing where you'll finish the race. With four remaining stages you can return to Paris (with some transfering), but you can also have a final stage which includes two ascents of La Planche des Belles Filles, the final one being a new Super-Duper beach sand road, which I assume will have been constructed in 10-20 years time.
I guess that will be up to your imagination:)
 
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Stage 12- Embrun-Montgenevre, 84 km



Intermediate Sprint Area

A short stage,I thought I had a stage profile already set up, one climb of the Iozard then descent to Briancon over 107km, but that didn’t save so I did this stage instead. The climbers will enjoy this stage, as the Col d’Iozard is the main event today. The mammoth climb will be to the liking of the climbers, but then they have to deal with the diesel climbers ln the Montgenevre, not a steep climb.

Iozard

Montgenevre

Montgenevre in winter.
 
I actually really like this as a way to make it a one-climb shootout but guarantee that legs are dead in it, a bit like a classic style Tour de Suisse stage, they used to do a lot of this /\/\/\__/ type stages to make sure the gaps were small enough for a one-week race by only being created on the final climb, but ensuring that there would be gaps by making sure legs are very tired.

I can't see ASO going for it, and I'm not sure it might be so effective in this instance once you have the colossal time gaps inevitable as a result of the Pla d'Adet stage, but as a format it's an unusual but pretty nice option.
Luke Rowe pace on Ventoux let's gooooooo
 
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