road cycling position

Oct 4, 2020
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Hello. Im riding for a few years and this year I started having problems with my saddle and sitting position. Used my saddle for like 15000 km and now its worn out and not straight anymore , the left side of saddle is abit down but maybe thats fine and not a problem?
The thing is l dont feel so comfortable on bike like year ago and can feel my left hip abit, maybe because Im not so fit now. My friends told me while riding Im falling on my right side and that my right side is more down. I wanted move my saddle abit and tried the method to put my heels on the pedals and ride like that and they say hips cant rock from side to side, my right leg is fine but left leg is rocking and seems abit shorter and harder to reach pedal. Any ideas what to try or what to change?
Thanks a lot.
 
The saddle should be level - both sides at the same height.
Your hips should not rock UP & DOWN - that can cause rubbing on the saddle, and is wasted body motion. With hips level, being able to reach the pedal with your heal is usually a good starting point for saddle height adjustment.
If one of your legs is significantly longer than the other leg, then perhaps using a thick shoe insole in the shorter leg might help to prevent hip rocking.

Jay
 
Oct 4, 2020
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Thanks for answers and for help. I was thinking about shoe insole also. About the saddle I use Bontrager Affinity saddle is there any similar saddle and does saddle height matters or only the width?
 
You should for a variety of reasons to try and replace the worn saddle,possibly bent rail w w like item..the padding density is usually an issue from one manufacturer to another..and saddle width changes,in nose or rear width can make a difference to wear " body parts " come in contact.
no matter what you do,get data!!! Get all measurements before going on an Easter egg hunt for the new perfect saddle. Know height, where the saddle is on the rails, distance from the stem bolt from the saddle tip and from the rear of the saddle. Put a level on the saddle. Using the bubble and a tape measure or ruler you can lift the level and note if your current position is up or down and by how much.
If you find a suitable seat right away try and put the new saddle on the bike in the same place as the old one..
it's like putting a sprinkle of flour on the ground as you walk through the woods so you can find your way back to where you started!!
Don't do radical change!! Don't take advice w extreme tilting or moving everything forward to follow a trend..go nice and slow and don't make any radical changes( ever!) But first find that comfort and hopefully balance you had before..
Also w the old saddle removed you can measure to see if something has delaminated or a rail is bent..
Everything I said is based on some data but not hundreds of riders,if you get back on the bike and feel good or great!! Keep riding but the biometric things you are having..shoes,cleat height,insoles,shims, shorts..the padding of your go to brand of shorts and saddle,width stiffness and padding all can make tiny changes that can add up..
A good bike fit..good bike fitter are like diamonds,precious gems!!!
 
Oct 4, 2020
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Hello. thinking about buying new Bontrager saddle does anyone know what are the differences between Aeolus, Verse, Montrose and Arvada saddles? My old saddle was length 270 and width 142. If there is no same width is better to choose bigger 145/148 over 138? Thanks.
 
Aug 25, 2020
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If you can, get a bike fit by a skilled fitter. If you have one leg shorter than the other there are solutions like spacers under the shims, also you can change the cleat angle (in relation to vertical) with shims. But to do all this you need to know what you are doing, I went for a bike fit and the fitter (ex TdF rider) said my left leg was shorter so fitted a spacer, also different shoes can require the shims. This is not a DIY job.
 
I am having the same issue with a sore hip/buttock/ischias and a saddle that is sinking to one side.
From my own experience, I don't think the saddle is the problem, but the way I ride. I tend to move my knee outwards when I get tired or ride with too high gearing. If that is due to how the cleat is positioned on the shoe, or how I'm built I don't know. It has become a little better from adjusting shoe/cleat position.
Going to a bike fitter is of course the best thing to do, but I haven't gotten around to do that yet either..
 
While we are at it, why saddle makers don't place a label with the dimensions under their saddles?
How a saddle actually feels depends greatly on the slope and contour of the curved portions. Attempting to accurately predict how a saddle would fit or feel based only on a few simple dimensions would not be successful.

Jay
 
How a saddle actually feels depends greatly on the slope and contour of the curved portions. Attempting to accurately predict how a saddle would fit or feel based only on a few simple dimensions would not be successful.

Jay

Yeah, I should have been more specific. Just a label with the width and length!
 

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