Rough Attempt at an All-Time Ranking

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A points based ranking system is the most methodically sound way of comparing riders. Most point systems overvalue secondary positions and lesser important races, though.

I would start out something like this:

Tour:
1st: 9 points
2nd: 4.5 points
3rd: 3 points

Giro/Vuelta:
1st: 6 points
2nd: 3 points
3rd: 2 points

Monument/Worlds/Olympics:
1st: 4.5 points
2nd: 2.25 points
3rd: 1.5 points

And then find out what a GT stage win and a win in other WT one day races and WT week long stage races should be valued at and call it a day.
 
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After this reaction by Hugo Koblet, guess who shows up at #67.

70 Pedro Delgado 298
69 Jan Janssen 311
68 Rudi Altig 313
67 Hugo Koblet 315
66 Charly Mottet 317
65 Stephen Roche 319
64 Federico Bahamontes 321
63 Davide Rebellin 325
62 Claudio Chiappucci 329
61 Walter Godefroot 329

It feels a bit ridiculous to put Rebellin in bold, but he's still active at the age of fifty.
 
A seven-time winner of Bordeaux-Paris is joined by two Spanish world champions and one of the "Big Four".

60 Herman Van Springel 331
59 Alessandro Petacchi 339
58 Abraham Olano 350
57 André Leducq 350
56 Nairo Quintana 351
55 François Faber 353
54 Oscar Freire 364
53 Charly Gaul 370
52 Gaetano Belloni 375
51 Ferdi Kübler 378

Quintana was an early bloomer, but with six GT podiums he remains the most successful Latin American rider to this day.
 
A seven-time winner of Bordeaux-Paris is joined by two Spanish world champions and one of the "Big Four".

60 Herman Van Springel 331
59 Alessandro Petacchi 339
58 Abraham Olano 350
57 André Leducq 350
56 Nairo Quintana 351
55 François Faber 353
54 Oscar Freire 364
53 Charly Gaul 370
52 Gaetano Belloni 375
51 Ferdi Kübler 378

Quintana was an early bloomer, but with six GT podiums he remains the most successful Latin American rider to this day.
What is a "Big Four"?
 
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A seven-time winner of Bordeaux-Paris is joined by two Spanish world champions and one of the "Big Four".

60 Herman Van Springel 331
59 Alessandro Petacchi 339
58 Abraham Olano 350
57 André Leducq 350
56 Nairo Quintana 351
55 François Faber 353
54 Oscar Freire 364
53 Charly Gaul 370
52 Gaetano Belloni 375
51 Ferdi Kübler 378

Quintana was an early bloomer, but with six GT podiums he remains the most successful Latin American rider to this day.
Another example of why we shouldn't just hand Pog the keys to the kingdom for the next 10 years.
 
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Another example of why we shouldn't just hand Pog the keys to the kingdom for the next 10 years.
True, but not a great comparison. Quintana's best year by PCS points was 2016 with 2074. It was his 5th year in the WT. Pogacar this year alone achieved over 3200 points. It was his 3rd year in the WT. Logic and history tell us that this is not likely to be his best year in terms of achievements. If he doesn't have any big injuries, other health issues, or unexpected events, he could well have another 2-3 years until his peak, and another 3-4 years of plateau and slow decline. Ie he could well go well into 2026-28 with a level similar to his 2021 season. The question to me is more if there is a challenger that can achieve a level similar to him. Can Roglic still improve another year or two and challenge Poga for another couple of years? Can anyone else from a poll of Remco, Vingegaard, Ayuso, or another name rise up to such a high level?
 
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The next section contains the best rider born in the USSR, the best Luxembourger, and a spooky coincidence.

50 Michele Bartoli 381
49 Alexander Vinokourov 383
48 Nicolas Frantz 385
47 Alex Zülle 387
46 Henri Pélissier 388
45 Laurent Fignon 401
44 Greg LeMond 411
43 Moreno Argentin 421
42 Paolo Bettini 427
41 Luis Ocaña 434

Yes, Fignon finishes one place below LeMond. Those freaking eight seconds...
 
The next section contains the best rider born in the USSR, the best Luxembourger, and a spooky coincidence.

50 Michele Bartoli 381
49 Alexander Vinokourov 383
48 Nicolas Frantz 385
47 Alex Zülle 387
46 Henri Pélissier 388
45 Laurent Fignon 401
44 Greg LeMond 411
43 Moreno Argentin 421
42 Paolo Bettini 427
41 Luis Ocaña 434

Yes, Fignon finishes one place below LeMond. Those freaking eight seconds...
This sort of shows the inherent silliness of comparing across the ages. Pelissier and Frantz were almost doing a completely different sport to the others
 
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Can Roglic still improve another year or two and challenge Poga for another couple of years? Can anyone else from a poll of Remco, Vingegaard, Ayuso, or another name rise up to such a high level?
Roglic is definitely the most dangerous rival in the near future. Just think about it: if not for him Pogacar would be 95% favourite to win every stage race. All bets are off when it comes to 4-5 years from now. It may turn out that Rog is Pog's greatest career rival (despite large age difference) and after his decline Tadej will have a big advantage over the field (if none of the prospects becomes as strong as some think).
 
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Frantz ended his career in 1934.

Out of 38 races named explicitly in the OP, 18 have not had even a single edition held by the time Frantz retired.
Surely deserves more respect than this though?

In some ways it is even more impressive what they did back in those days and a reason why some races are more prestigious than others. Because of all the history and riders of the past.
 
Make way for the two greatest Germans, a Manxman, the highest ranked Slovenian, and three Belgian world champions in a row.

40 Jan Raas 438
39 Gianni Bugno 445
38 Jan Ullrich 454
37 Mark Cavendish 455
36 Primož Roglič 459

35 Louison Bobet 464
34 Philippe Gilbert 486
33 Rik Van Steenbergen 488
32 Johan Museeuw 489
31 Erik Zabel 492

Maybe we should include results from ski jumping - not to benefit anyone in particular.
 
Surely deserves more respect than this though?

In some ways it is even more impressive what they did back in those days and a reason why some races are more prestigious than others. Because of all the history and riders of the past.
Frantz won both of his Tours when the majority of the stages were held in a TTT format.

That's one more thing to add when it comes to comparing the incomparable.
 
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Make way for the two greatest Germans, a Manxman, the highest ranked Slovenian, and three Belgian world champions in a row.

40 Jan Raas 438
39 Gianni Bugno 445
38 Jan Ullrich 454
37 Mark Cavendish 455
36 Primož Roglič 459

35 Louison Bobet 464
34 Philippe Gilbert 486
33 Rik Van Steenbergen 488
32 Johan Museeuw 489
31 Erik Zabel 492

Maybe we should include results from ski jumping - not to benefit anyone in particular.
Are you sure? I'm still expecting the legend Simon Špilak to rank somewhere between 10th and 20th position.
 
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