Team Ineos (Formerly the Sky thread)

Page 1260 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Netserk said:
I don't have any hope that you will name any specific team. Any will do. Just name a team, a year and a doctor that matches.
How can I answer when every team changes riders once a year? I guess my local cycling club hasn't changed or had any new riders register this year and one is a doctor? Is that good enough?
 
samhocking said:
How can I answer when every team changes riders once a year? I guess my local cycling club hasn't changed or had any new riders register this year and one is a doctor? Is that good enough?
Name one team that hired one doctor, which received far better results the following year, primarily with riders who already were there the year before (to make sure that it was the doctor who was the difference in results and not the hiring of a star rider)

Remember your post I am responding to
 
So are you saying the (with the same riders on the team) bit so consciously emphasised in brackets and then highlighted even more in bold is not meant to be there now so I can answer? Ooohh, I like the moving goalposts questions!
 
samhocking said:
So are you saying the (with the same riders on the team) bit so consciously emphasised in brackets and then highlighted even more in bold is not meant to be there now so I can answer? Ooohh, I like the moving goalposts questions!
No, it is meant to be there, but it's not my fault that you misunderstood its meaning. BTW I didn't bold it (I also don't get why you think it's an emphasis to put something in parentheses, when the opposite is what is normally the case). I explained to you what I meant by it.

Now that is out of the way, you can answer the question and thereby prove that you want to have a genuine conversation.
 
samhocking said:
OK
When Team GB formed Sky Track Cycling in 2007 with Dr Steve Peters. Phenomenal successes in that pro team in 2008 & 2009 compared to 2007 without him.
This is in the road section, about a road team. I thought that much was obvious.

When you said that the same could be said of any team, I thought you'd be able to actually name at least just one (that like Sky also was a pro road team). I think it's quite telling if that is the closest you can get.
 
OK, to be serious, I was not actually relating a team's success to a Dr arriving or departing in a team anyway when I was saying Sky & Team GB/British Cycling are the same thing and success came under Brailsford while Leinders was still at Rabobank. When an Olymypic & World track squad go from 0 to winning nearly every event at Olympic & world level against traditional cycling nations with more than just one velodrome to train on, this should raise eyebrows too. However apparently this kind of success is to be expected as the talent pool is small, even though a rider in this pool of nobodys won wherever Brailsford was including Tour de France twice?

My point is the consistent variable in Sky/Team GB success is NOT Leinders, it's Brailsford and what other Dr Ferrari?
 
:confused:

Huh?

Does that mean that you do find it unique and not something that happens on any team as you previously wrote?

Or is a track team not the closest to have the same thing happening, but you just chose to not give a comparable (to Sky) example? Surely that should be very easy to do when it happens on any team, right?
 
Netserk said:
:confused:

Huh?

Does that mean that you do find it unique and not something that happens on any team as you previously wrote?

Or is a track team not the closest to have the same thing happening, but you just chose to not give a comparable (to Sky) example? Surely that should be very easy to do when it happens on any team, right?
My point is riders cross paths with different Dr(s) each year all the time, sometimes win, sometimes not. I don't think the coincidence of Sky winning should hold so much weight with Dr Leinders when success came without him anyway and Rabobank never had any Tour success with Leinders for 14 years trying! How did he get so good at doping a track donkey like Wiggins simply by switching from Rabobank to Sky over the winter?
 
1) Sky didn't have any (GT) success before Leinders.

2) Leinders won two GTs with Menchov and was on the way to win the Tour with Rasmussen.

edit:

By doping. He was a lot stronger with Leinders than he was at Garmin. Makes sense a doping doctor will help a doping rider to do better.



I'm still waiting for you to name me a (pro) team, doctor and year.
 
1. I'm talking about success under Brailsford. He is the consistent element of success wherever he is. You can't simply ignore the level of success he had on the track at Olympic & World level simply because it is not road.

2. I don't see the ride and fall of Menchov simply because Leinders is around? Where is the evidence of this? This is what I mean, riders come and go through teams sometimes win, sometimes don't, this is the nature of any sporting team with even the same doctor doping them as with Menchov & Rabobank.

3. If Leinders couldn't get Menchov to win The Tour in 14 years trying, there is no chance he could do it with Wiggins in a few months, or is Wiggins a better GT rider than Menchov despite coming from that unimportant tiny pool of weak track cycling talent?

I've explained my reason for not answering and that's because I never said success in a team is down to or not down to a Dr arrival if the success is seen before his arrival as repeated in 1. & 2. above explaining my meaning.
 
samhocking said:
I've explained my reason for not answering and that's because I never said success in a team is down to or not down to a Dr arrival.
You answering the question doesn't necessitate that you think it's down to the arrival of a doctor.

There's two genuine options:

1: you admit that your claim was false and that it doesn't happen on any team.

2: In the case that your claim was correct, then no matter if it's down to the arrival of a doctor or not, it will be easy for you to answer the question.

...



1: Yes I can and I just did. This is road cycling, the sport for real pros.

2: Duh, I haven't claimed otherwise. Strawman. He came from a dirty team before he got to Rabo. No surprise that the shift going from one doping system/doctor to another is less than that of a team not having a experienced doping doctor to hiring Leinders.

3: Doping is not a level playing field. Some respond better than others.
 
samhocking said:
1. I'm talking about success under Brailsford. He is the consistent element of success wherever he is. You can't simply ignore the level of success he had on the track at Olympic & World level simply because it is not road.

2. I don't see the ride and fall of Menchov simply because Leinders is around? Where is the evidence of this? This is what I mean, riders come and go through teams sometimes win, sometimes don't, this is the nature of any sporting team with even the same doctor doping them.

3. If he couldn't get Menchov to win The Tour, there is no chance he could do it with Wiggins, or is Wiggins a better GT rider than Menchov coming from unimportant tiny pool of track cycling talent?

I've explained my reason for not answering and that's because I never said success in a team is down to or not down to a Dr arrival if the success is seen before his arrival as repeated in 1. & 2. above explaining my meaning.
I'm going with option A.

Quite possible, as you suggested above, that Dr's were involved on the track.

I know, I know, it is a shock that track cyclists would ever consider doping.

What your arguments appear to underscore is that Leinders was a LOT better doping Dr than some of us would believe.

Personally, I thought he was an also ran.

Going by your Wiggins donkey example - your example not mine - you make him sound like a veritable Ferrari.

Dave.
 
Mar 12, 2009
2,527
0
0
samhocking said:
snipped

My point is the consistent variable in Sky/Team GB success is NOT Leinders, it's Brailsford and what other Dr Ferrari?
Well if you consider Sky's GT success, this is very relevant... Esp. #70
 
The point was riders and teams rise and fall, but Brailsfords success doesn't with or without Leinders. If you can't accept a relationship between success of Brailsford and Wiggins on the track and then again on the road with or without Leinders then I wish you good night because this was my original point you never answered either.
 
samhocking said:
The point was riders and teams rise and fall, but Brailsfords success doesn't with or without Leinders. If you can't accept a relationship between success of Brailsford and Wiggins on the track and then again on the road with or without Leinders then I wish you good night because this was my original point you never answered either.
That's very rich of you.

You made a claim. I questioned that.

Now you refuse to answer that in any way and blame that on me for something that you have interpreted from what I said down the line.

First things first.

Can you name a team, doctor and year or can you not?
 
What? My exact reply to you was:
"You can say the same about nearly any team and rider".
I make no reference to a Dr, you did.
By any team and rider, i mean the 'rise and fall' in a 2 year snapshot like you quoted not representing the success Brailsford and Wiggins have had before Lenders. This is what I mean by not answering. You simply choose to ignore 10 years and focus on 2 and when asked say track doesn't count when its the same two individuals working alongside each other continually throughout their whole careers so far.
 
samhocking said:
What? My exact reply to you was:
"You can say the same about nearly any team and rider".
I make no reference to a Dr, you did.
By any team and rider, i mean the 'rise and fall' in a 2 year snapshot like you quoted not representing the success Brailsford and Wiggins have had before Lenders. This is what I mean by not answering. You simply choose to ignore 10 years and focus on 2 and when asked say track doesn't count when its the same two individuals working alongside each other continually throughout their whole careers so far.
So it has never happened on any other pro team that the arrival of a doctor has led to the existing riders improving? That only happened when Sky hired Leinders?
 
I don't have a clue, its hard enough keeping track of what riders switch teams each year. I couldn't even name the Dr on half the teams, could you?, let alone claim they are the reason for a riders and teams success over two years? What kind of question or claim is that, its not even related to what you were replying to anyway?
 
Netserk said:
So it has never happened on any other pro team that the arrival of a doctor has led to the existing riders improving? That only happened when Sky hired Leinders?
You're putting forward a false proposition. You are the one claiming that the doctor was the variable that created the change. Samhocking is not. He is saying that it is not a variable.
Therefore, your challenge should be to name a pro team that has improved regardless of staff changes. An inability to name one without that variable would emphasise the relevance of that variable.

If your hypothesis is that Event A happened because of Event B, then the lack of other occurences of Event A being conicident with Event B undermines your hypothesis rather than supports it. A lack of Event As in the absence of Event B would support it.

(And in that spirit I would point you in the direction of what was almost a low budget Sky prototype - HTC. In their first year under Stapleton, after the big 2006 clear out, they were 10th on CQ ranking. After that they were top two every year until their demise).

But back to Sky. They entered the sport in 2010 as a completely new team, almost entirely staffed by novices in their jobs on a road team. Is it really extraordinary that they would learn and improve?
 
Parker said:
You're putting forward a false proposition. You are the one claiming that the doctor was the variable that created the change. Samhocking is not. He is saying that it is not a variable.
Therefore, your challenge should be to name a pro team that has improved regardless of staff changes. An inability to name one without that variable would emphasise the relevance of that variable.

(And in that spirit I would point you in the direction of what was almost a low budget Sky prototype - HTC. In their first year under Stapleton, after the big 2006 clear out, they were 10th on CQ ranking. After that they were top two every year until their demise).

But back to Sky. They entered the sport in 2010 as a completely new team, almost entirely staffed by novices in their jobs on a road team. Is it really extraordinary that they would learn and improve?
Quickstep sure kicked things back up a notch when they brought on Ibarguren. Just saying...

Edit: and HTC were NOT a low budget team.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS