The Universe: Cosmology, Nature etc.

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Apr 16, 2016
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ScienceIsCool said:
I'm climbing that Dunning-Kruger curve (people with a bit of knowledge can't recognize that they aren't experts...) as we dip into string theory, metaphysics and the like, so I will only give a partial answer.

Entanglement binds two particles together in a fundamental way. Let's say one has spin "up", then the other *must* have spin "down". The problem is that each particle behaves as though it has both spins simultaneously until you measure one of them. Then the spin is determined for both particles. One up and one down.

Now let's say you entangle two particles and then separate them to opposite sides of the continent. When you measure one to be spin up, the other instantaneously becomes spin down. Instantaneous as in faster than the speed of light, no time at all, it becomes spin down. That is what is referred to as "spooky action at a distance".

The thought was maybe there's some hidden variable we don't know about that gets set (i.e., particle becomes spin up or down) at the time of entanglement. We just can't observe that variable until we observe the particle. In other words, the spin was predetermines at entanglement. Well, that was ruled out. So what's left? Instantaneous, faster than light communication? That is, errr... problematic.

This all becomes great fodder for the philosopher at meta-physicist, but there's still plenty of objective reality based physics left to test before we get to the "weird" stuff. Plus, we know that the standard model of particle physics is incomplete (dark matter, gravity, etc) and we can't resolve quantum gravity, so it might just very well be that this will all shake out once we get a new model of the universe.

John Swanson
lol, you're focused on observations but at this level isn't it the observer that determines what is observed as there's no objective reality? Anyway, have fun trying to define all the "observations". If there's no travel, there's no speed of light. Maybe the "spin" is all in your head - instantaneous. I don't know.
 
Jun 9, 2016
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Bob Lazar predicted gravity waves when he explained how UFOs work. Alien spacecraft amplify gravity waves according to him. It isn't the first time one of his predictions are fist mocked and many years later accepted as mainstream by the scientific community. :D
 
Mar 14, 2016
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Alex Simmons/RST said:
This thread should be in the clinic. It'd fit right in with all the other threads rife with the logically fallacious.
It's a pity, a fact-based thread about science would be cool.
 
Apr 16, 2016
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CheckMyPecs said:
Alex Simmons/RST said:
This thread should be in the clinic. It'd fit right in with all the other threads rife with the logically fallacious.
It's a pity, a fact-based thread about science would be cool.
So don't complain, start discussing the "facts". I'll stay out of it. You guys could be up for multiple Nobel prizes if you can logically explain paradox. Good luck.
 
The Juno voyage to Jupiter is another extraordinary scientific achievement. I am just in awe of what these astrophysicists do. So much time, effort and money is on the line, the slightest glitch can blow it all, and they pulled it off.

There were so many obstacles to overcome. The satellite is powered by three wing-like solar panels, which had to be folded in for the satellite to fit in the nose cone of the rocket launch; then they had to unfold perfectly when the satellite was ejected from the final stage. Juno orbited the earth for about two years, gaining speed, then was flung towards Jupiter, another three years' journey. When it got close to the planet, it had to fire engines in just the right direction to slow it down just enough to fall into the planet's orbit. Now in that orbit, there are enormous amounts of radiation that the satellite and its delicate scientific instruments have to be protected from, as well as extremes of temperature.

So far, everything has gone off virtually perfectly, and data are being sent back. The most interesting thing I learned is that it's thought that when our sun eventually burns out, and becomes a red giant that swallows the earth, Jupiter will remain. One of its moons, Europa, has water or ice, and could conceivably be home to life that survives that on earth. Through a process known as tidal flexing, frictional forces provide an energy source, so the sun's radiation would not be necessary to support life on this moon. Key elements may be transported to Europa from another moon orbiting Jupiter, Io, which has heavy volcanic activity.
 
Jul 5, 2009
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Merckx index said:
The Juno voyage to Jupiter is another extraordinary scientific achievement. I am just in awe of what these astrophysicists do. So much time, effort and money is on the line, the slightest glitch can blow it all, and they pulled it off.

There were so many obstacles to overcome. The satellite is powered by three wing-like solar panels, which had to be folded in for the satellite to fit in the nose cone of the rocket launch; then they had to unfold perfectly when the satellite was ejected from the final stage. Juno orbited the earth for about two years, gaining speed, then was flung towards Jupiter, another three years' journey. When it got close to the planet, it had to fire engines in just the right direction to slow it down just enough to fall into the planet's orbit. Now in that orbit, there are enormous amounts of radiation that the satellite and its delicate scientific instruments have to be protected from, as well as extremes of temperature.

So far, everything has gone off virtually perfectly, and data are being sent back. The most interesting thing I learned is that it's thought that when our sun eventually burns out, and becomes a red giant that swallows the earth, Jupiter will remain. One of its moons, Europa, has water or ice, and could conceivably be home to life that survives that on earth. Through a process known as tidal flexing, frictional forces provide an energy source, so the sun's radiation would not be necessary to support life on this moon. Key elements may be transported to Europa from another moon orbiting Jupiter, Io, which has heavy volcanic activity.
Just so you know, Europa is already a prime candidate for life in our solar system. The leading candidate in fact. The tidal forces you're talking about are responsible for what is thought to be a planet-wide sub-surface ocean of liquid water! So instead of the sun, you have friction forces providing the heat. Add water and a chemical soup. Our history says that's all you need to create life. And just like our atmosphere protecting us from the solar wind, all that water would protect very well against the radioactive blast from jupiter's magnetic field.

John Swanson
 

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