Upper-body training for cyclists

Mar 14, 2016
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This is pathetic.





I've got a big upper body and I manage to win a few races here and there every season. Sure, I win at the amateur level, but blokes with better genetics than mine should be able to do the same in pro races.
 
Mar 14, 2009
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Why? Because it is all about power to weight ratio and upper body muscles are just an extra weight :cool:
 
Mar 14, 2016
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Re:

Jancouver said:
Why? Because it is all about power to weight ratio and upper body muscles are just an extra weight :cool:
It's better to lose a few seconds than to lose your dignity.

 
Mar 14, 2016
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Re: Re:

MikeTichondrius said:
CheckMyPecs said:
Jancouver said:
Why? Because it is all about power to weight ratio and upper body muscles are just an extra weight :cool:
It's better to lose a few seconds than to lose your dignity.
Username coherent with argument.
I can think of many reasons why cyclists should train their upper bodies to boost their performance:

*stronger forearms mean cyclists can grip their handlebar better and thus prevent falls
*stronger abs and core muscles protect the spine and help prevent back injuries

etc.
 
Re: Re:

CheckMyPecs said:
MikeTichondrius said:
CheckMyPecs said:
Jancouver said:
Why? Because it is all about power to weight ratio and upper body muscles are just an extra weight :cool:
It's better to lose a few seconds than to lose your dignity.
Username coherent with argument.
I can think of many reasons why cyclists should train their upper bodies to boost their performance:

*stronger forearms mean cyclists can grip their handlebar better and thus prevent falls
*stronger abs and core muscles protect the spine and help prevent back injuries

etc.
Dude :eek:

Probably time to call it a night.
 
Sep 18, 2015
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If you think they neglect core workouts you are wrong.
Anyway, Armstrong was a triathlete, coming from swimming with a ogood upper body development. Not necessary. They have to ride their bikes, not lift them
 
Mar 14, 2016
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Flat Out said:
If you think they neglect core workouts you are wrong.
Anyway, Armstrong was a triathlete, coming from swimming with a ogood upper body development. Not necessary. They have to ride their bikes, not lift them
Honest to God, I can't look at these pictures of Brajkovic and Feillu and believe these guys train their core.
 
Classics riders are different though and can afford slightly more muscle mass because they don't have to climb as much.

And yes, a stronger core and more musculature helps prevent bone injuries. The reason cyclists break so many bones when they fall is partly because there's no muscle to protect them. But it doesn't help them climb faster, so they'll take the risk knowing that when they fall they will break their collarbone just to have a higher power/weight ratio.

It's pretty simple really. Sumo wrestlers and road race cyclists are two polar opposites of the spectrum of sportsmen in terms of body shape. Cyclists are pretty repulsive, but that's not the point.
 
Re: Re:

CheckMyPecs said:
MikeTichondrius said:
CheckMyPecs said:
Jancouver said:
Why? Because it is all about power to weight ratio and upper body muscles are just an extra weight :cool:
It's better to lose a few seconds than to lose your dignity.
Username coherent with argument.
I can think of many reasons why cyclists should train their upper bodies to boost their performance:

*stronger forearms mean cyclists can grip their handlebar better and thus prevent falls
*stronger abs and core muscles protect the spine and help prevent back injuries

etc.
Many of the best bike handlers and descenders in the peloton are actually climbers with skinny arms.
 
Mar 14, 2016
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Aug 4, 2010
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IMO if you have a stronger arms its easier to ride off the saddle for a long period of time (otoh AC doesnt support this theory :p)
 
Re:

ILovecycling said:
IMO if you have a stronger arms its easier to ride off the saddle for a long period of time (otoh AC doesnt support this theory :p)
Think it was a GCN-episode, where Matt was riding with Alberto, asking him if he ever trained his arm muscles for "out of the saddle"-style. Alberto just looked at him like he was stupid :D
 
Re: Re:

CheckMyPecs said:
Jancouver said:
Why? Because it is all about power to weight ratio and upper body muscles are just an extra weight :cool:
It's better to lose a few seconds than to lose your dignity.
Your dignity has nothing to do with how your upper body looks. The majority of people work out because they are insecure about themselves/their bodies, and gain self-esteem by making themselves stronger, often in the hope of becoming more attractive to the opposite sex (or the same sex for that matter)

Road and track cyclists have absolutely nothing to gain from gaining muscle on their upper body (except maybe to a very limited extent the cobbles specialists)
 
Being skinny is a big advantage when the road goes uphill. I've never had great stamina, but I drop pretty much everybody walking or riding uphill with ease. My BMI sometimes reaches 18,6. My mates made jokes about me that I walk uphill like it's flat. I have strong legs but weak upper body. When I gained just 3-4 kgs once I felt it was no longer that easy to walk uphill. And mind you, muscles are heavier than fat.
 
Jun 22, 2014
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RedheadDane said:
Can't help but wonder why you seem to care so much about this.
Yes, pro-cyclists tend to be rather skinny.
Yes, it does look rather silly.
But... does it matter to you?
Imagine watching during the Chicken years. One would end up begging for a skeleton filter on your TV like some channels had for vuvuzelas at the SA World Cup.
 
Aug 31, 2012
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Armstrong was quick uphill despite his weight, not because of it.

This, surely, is the ideal cyclist upper body

 

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