what a few motorbike riders think of TdF'11

Page 2 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Dr. Maserati said:
They may be ignorant, but that matters little as the perception equals their reality.



I cannot log on to the moto site yet - but if your post are quotes from it then it shows that even the 'level-headed' comments view the sport as dirty.
Yes, but they are they are also aware that other sports aren't any better, they just don't expose themselves.
 

Dr. Maserati

BANNED
Jun 19, 2009
13,250
1
0
andy1234 said:
Yes, but they are they are also aware that other sports aren't any better, they just don't expose themselves.
You mean, unlike Pro cycling "they just don't expose themselves", repeatedly.

To the blue - not all comments (that have been quoted) have expressed that view.
 
Dec 30, 2010
850
0
0
ergmonkey said:
I don't doubt it. If I weren't so scared of killing myself during the learning curve stage, I would love to experience my favorite rides (and new ones) on a motorbike. I'd also love to cover that much more ground whenever I'm some place new.

I also have read or watched only a handful of racer profiles for top motorized bike racers (mix of sportbike, motocross, you name it) and I think they all mentioned road cycling as a favorite part of their training.

Finally, despite having a nasty encounter with a car driver on almost every ride I do, I can't remember when--in decades of road cycling--I had a really unpleasant encounter with a motorbike. They never honk aggressively, swerve at me, shout a bunch of obscenities at me just for being there, make dangerous right-hand turns that force me into the curb, etc. The only slightly regrettable encounter was when I was climbing up a canyon and a guy in a full-on racing suit got a speed whobble coming down and looked like he might take me out. Obviously, that was just an accident--and he managed to keep it upright, thankfully.


The reason being, motorcyclists know too well what it is like to be bullied by the bigger vehicles. The vast majority of the vehicles in North America, or northern Europe are 4 wheeled vehicles, with much more weight behind them than motorcycles.

If the two types (2 and 4 wheeled) of vehicle come into contact with each other, the vast majority of the time, it is the motorcyclist who gets the worst injuries. Motorcyclists are inclined to give smaller vehicles "their space", because the motorcyclists have their space invaded almost every ride.

I used to ride motorcycles when I was in my teens and twenties. It is a skill, like any other. The earlier you start, the more skilled you will become. Many people start well into their adulthood. Their lack of skill is somewhat offset by their less aggressive riding habits. Note motorcycles are 37 times as deadly per mile travelled, as a car is (for every mile a motorcycle travels, you have to travel 37 miles in a car to get the same risk of mortality).
http://www.iihs.org/research/fatality_facts_2009/motorcycles.html

If you are interested in motorcycles read the "ride reports" at "advrider", "pashnit", or "sportstouring.net". For example, this is one of my favorites :
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=675841
 
Aug 11, 2009
729
0
0
Andynonomous said:
The reason being, motorcyclists know too well what it is like to be bullied by the bigger vehicles. The vast majority of the vehicles in North America, or northern Europe are 4 wheeled vehicles, with much more weight behind them than motorcycles.

If the two types (2 and 4 wheeled) of vehicle come into contact with each other, the vast majority of the time, it is the motorcyclist who gets the worst injuries. Motorcyclists are inclined to give smaller vehicles "their space", because the motorcyclists have their space invaded almost every ride.

I used to ride motorcycles when I was in my teens and twenties. It is a skill, like any other. The earlier you start, the more skilled you will become. Many people start well into their adulthood. Their lack of skill is somewhat offset by their less aggressive riding habits. Note motorcycles are 37 times as deadly per mile travelled, as a car is (for every mile a motorcycle travels, you have to travel 37 miles in a car to get the same risk of mortality).
http://www.iihs.org/research/fatality_facts_2009/motorcycles.html

If you are interested in motorcycles read the "ride reports" at "advrider", "pashnit", or "sportstouring.net". For example, this is one of my favorites :
http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=675841
Thanks for all of the input.

Unfortunately, I don't think anything can prevent a new motorcycle from being very bad for my marriage.
 
Dec 30, 2010
850
0
0
ergmonkey said:
Thanks for all of the input.

Unfortunately, I don't think anything can prevent a new motorcycle from being very bad for my marriage.
LOL !

Most people take up motorcycle riding in their teens, or early 20s. They generally give it up when they get married, then buy a motorcycle again when the kids grow up. Married, and motorcycle, generally don't go together very well (yes, there are a few exceptions).
 
Jul 30, 2009
1,735
0
0
Benotti69 said:
nah most of the PRR posters don't come in here and when they do their opinions are so disbelieving....
This just doesnt seem true to me - the main body of posters on the Pro forum come on here - and the ones that dont, know the truth but have got over it.

All the belgian and dutch guys know the score - they just love bike racing more than the cynics on here and are more forgiving.
 

ChrisRider

BANNED
Mar 6, 2013
9
0
0
I agree, it is the same in all sports, currently there is a huge investigation in rugby union underway, for a very similar thing, of doping and blood transfusions. No one would have thought it would go that far. But where there is professional competition to be won, it makes people do crazy things to win.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

Latest posts