2016 TdF, Stage 10: Escaldes-Engordany → Revel (197km)

Aug 31, 2014
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Stage 10: Escaldes-Engordany → Revel (197 km, Hilly)

Tuesday, July 12thStage infoStartlistRoadbookRules • Weather: Start, Halfway, Finish
Starts at 12:35 - Live video from 14:15 - Finish at 17:15 (CEST) • Live tickerLivestreams


Route:



Profile:



Mountain passes & hills:
Km 24.0 - Port d'Envalira (2 408 m) Souvenir Henri Desgrange 22.6 kilometre-long climb at 5.5% - category 1
Km 190.0 - Côte de Saint-Ferréol 1.8 kilometre-long climb at 6.6% - category 3



Final Kilometres:




Google Street view of last km - Right in the roundabout then first left.​

Preview:
CyclingQuotes.com said:
The first day after a rest day can be dangerous and so many riders will be pleased to know that there will be no big mountain stage on the menu when the riders get back in the saddle after their first day off. Stage 10 should give the GC riders a chance to ease back into competition but that’s definitely not the case for the sprinters. They don’t have many opportunities left and so they will go all in to get a bunch sprint in the well-known, tricky finale in Revel. However, a big mountain at the start of the race and the final challenge of Cote de Saint-Ferreol will do nothing to make it easy for the fast finishers.

The 197km course is the start of the traditional journey between the Pyrenees and the Alps and will see the riders travel from the Andorran city of Escaldes Engordany in the middle of the mountains to Revel. Throughout most of the stage, they will be riding in a northerly direction and they will get things off to a brutal start. Right from the beginning, they will go up the category 1 Port d’Envalira (22.6km, 5.5%) whose top sits at 2408m and so is the highest point of this year’s race. The lower slopes are pretty easy but the final 5.6km are much tougher with gradients of 6-8%.

After the climb, the riders will descend out of the Pyrenean heartland and return to the completely flat terrain in the area north of the mountains. There won’t be any challenges and the highlight will be the intermediate sprint which comes at the 122.5km mark. It’s very straightforward and comes on a long, straight, flat road. From there, the riders will continue along flat roads until they are very close to the outskirts of Revel.

Instead of heading straight to the finish, the riders will do as they always do here. A small loop on the southeastern outskirts of the city will see them go up the category 3 Cote de Saint-Ferreol (1.8km, 6.6%) just 7km from the finish. From there, they will descend to the final 3km which are flat. The descent is a bit technical but the final 3200m are almost completely straight and flat, with just two turns in very quick succession 600m from the line. The finishing straight is 6m wide.

The finale is a well-known one as it was used in both 2005 and 2010. On both occasions, the sprinters failed to bring it back together for a bunch sprint so the pure sprinters will be a bit uncertain about their chances, especially with such a tough start. On the other hand, it’s a big goal for riders like John Degenkolb, Alexander Kristoff and Michael Matthews and it would be a bit of a failure if they don’t try to bring it back together. That doesn’t mean that they will be successful, especially if a strong group escapes from the start. Hence, this stage could both be won by a long-distance breakaway like it did in 2005, by a late attacker like it did in 2010 and in a reduced bunch sprint.

In 2010, Alexandre Vinokourov attacked on the final climb and reached the finish with a 13-second advantage before Mark Cavendish beat Alessandro Petacchi in the sprint for second. In 2005, Paolo Savoldelli emerged as the strongest from a breakaway while Jan Ullrich famously went on the attack on the final climb. He failed to drop Lance Armstrong but Floyd Landis lost 20 seconds on a day when the early breakaway arrived with an advantage of more than 22 minutes. In 2000, Erik Dekker was the strongest from an early breakaway.
Current GC standings:



Withdrawals Stage 9:
DNF: RENSHAW, Mark (Dimension Data) - illness
DNF: CONTADOR, Alberto (Tinkoff) - injured by earlier crashes, illness
DNF: LADAGNOUS, Matthieu (FDJ) - illness
DNF: PINEAU, Cédric (FDJ) - illness


All Withdrawals:
RENSHAW (DDD) LADAGNOUS, PINEAU (FDJ) MØRKØV (KAT) CONTADOR (TNK)
193 of 198 riders remain in the race.



← Stage 9 ThreadStage 11 Thread →
 
I really believe Peter Sagan will go for this one. Not because of wanting the victory but his target will be wearing the green jersey after this stage + Majka will join him to get KOM points. If Cav and Kittel will get dropped and lose 7-8 mins on the mountain, then EQS and DDD will have to focus to try to get them just before the finish /and forget intermediate sprint points/.
 
Will be interesting to see how Tinkoff play this - now that they have potentially five riders to fully support Sagan. They could try to shell the other sprinters on the Envalira and hold them off all day, but that would require absolutely brutal amount of work, because I can't see many other teams helping them. Probably will wait until that last bump and try to thin out the peloton there instead.

That really long descent to Tarascon is so straight and fast, that it's difficult to see a breakaway staying clear, even if they get about 10 minutes on the climb.
 
Martin said:
I really believe Peter Sagan will go for this one. Not because of wanting the victory but his target will be wearing the green jersey after this stage + Majka will join him to get KOM points. If Cav and Kittel will get dropped and lose 7-8 mins on the mountain, then EQS and DDD will have to focus to try to get them just before the finish /and forget intermediate sprint points/.
There's no doubt in my mind that Cavendish will withdraw in the Alps with the climbing legs he's showed so far.
But if Sagan thinks he really need that 20 points, your scenario seems realistic. Either Kittel, Cav or Greipel will win the stage, though.
 
Sagan has a few options. He can go into the break and hope that the sprint teams are tired after the pyrenees. The advantage would be that he would almost certainly win the intermediate sprint, disadvantage is that he probably won't have a chance to win the stage if the break gets caught. If he doesn't go to the break he also has different options. His team could try to set a crazy pace on the first climb to drop the sprinters, they could also try to drop everyone on the short climb near the finish, or sagan could try to attack before the descent like he did it in a stage 2014, before he was caught again and lost the sprint against trentin. I think the 2nd of the 3 is the most likely one but I would prefer to see tinkoff going all out on the first climb. Anyway this should be a great stage since I expect a big break and I dont think all sprint teams will want to work.
 
Gigs_98 said:
Sagan has a few options. He can go into the break and hope that the sprint teams are tired after the pyrenees. The advantage would be that he would almost certainly win the intermediate sprint, disadvantage is that he probably won't have a chance to win the stage if the break gets caught. If he doesn't go to the break he also has different options. His team could try to set a crazy pace on the first climb to drop the sprinters, they could also try to drop everyone on the short climb near the finish, or sagan could try to attack before the descent like he did it in a stage 2014, before he was caught again and lost the sprint against trentin. I think the 2nd of the 3 is the most likely one but I would prefer to see tinkoff going all out on the first climb. Anyway this should be a great stage since I expect a big break and I dont think all sprint teams will want to work.
He should definately go into the break. It doesn't not necessarily mean, that he can't win the stage after the break is caught. On the contrary, if he doesn't go the the break, he won't have any points from the intermadiate sprint, and possibly won't win the stage too, because nobody will want to chase except Tinkoff. DDD and Etixx won't help, because there is enough stages where they don't have to fear of Cav or Kittel getting dropped in the last climb. If sagan is in the break, he, as you said, will almost certainly get the 20 points, and he doesn't necessarily need to work with the break 100%. If the break is caught, then tinkoff is rested and try to drop Kittel and Cavendish in the last climb. If the break is not caught, sagan will attack on the last climb and win solo.
 
Mar 31, 2014
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Typical "all out for the first hour" stage. A big group with the likes of Pinot, Majka, Costa will jump away. Then it will calm down and the sprinters come back and their teams will control the race. Lotto for Greipel, Direct Energy for Coquard, maybe Katusha for Kristoff, maybe Dimension Data for Cav, maybe Orica for Matthews. So its all about the last hill in the last 8km of the stage. Can they drop Kittel? Can they drop Cav? Can they drop Greipel? Thats the question.
 
With no Contador to worry about any more, I can see Tinkoff really setting a hard pace on the first climb.

At this point, after all his track stuff, Cav is probably the worst climber in the peloton, and it's definitely possible that we see Kittel and Greipel there at the end without Cav being there.

And of course there's the cat 3 near the end to take away that edge from the big sprinters' sprint if they do make it to the finale.

Perfect stage for Sagan, who should be able to win green without needing to go in the break on Tuesday, should just go for the stage win
 
Re:

PremierAndrew said:
With no Contador to worry about any more, I can see Tinkoff really setting a hard pace on the first climb.

At this point, after all his track stuff, Cav is probably the worst climber in the peloton, and it's definitely possible that we see Kittel and Greipel there at the end without Cav being there.

And of course there's the cat 3 near the end to take away that edge from the big sprinters' sprint if they do make it to the finale.

Perfect stage for Sagan, who should be able to win green without needing to go in the break on Tuesday, should just go for the stage win[/b]
Not necessarily. tomorrow's stages is considered as medium mountain stage, so there's only 30 points for the winner, and the differencies in the other places are not that big. Which means if cav survives the cat 3 climb and Sagan wins, Cav will still get reasonable amount of points, unless he is so tired that he won't sprint. In this kind of stages sagan should make as many points on Cav as possible, otherewise cav will get the green back in paris. If sagan doesn't enter the last stage with at least 40 points lead, he will most definately loose the jersey.
 
I don't like stages like this. We end up with a massive fight at the start, which rarely means anything to GC. There's often a re-grouping, followed by a break near the end with a group of a dozen or so trying to get away, and a Cat 3 climb at the end dropping the pure sprinters from winning. In the end, you feel like it was a waste of a good climb up the Envarali, and a waste of the Henri Desgrange. The only hope is that tired or soft legs on riders lead to some splits at the end. But on a Cat 3 climb?
 
Re:

DFA123 said:
Will be interesting to see how Tinkoff play this - now that they have potentially five riders to fully support Sagan. They could try to shell the other sprinters on the Envalira and hold them off all day, but that would require absolutely brutal amount of work, because I can't see many other teams helping them. Probably will wait until that last bump and try to thin out the peloton there instead.

That really long descent to Tarascon is so straight and fast, that it's difficult to see a breakaway staying clear, even if they get about 10 minutes on the climb.
Agree, there is no way Tosatto, Bodnar, Gatto and Valgren could drop sprinters and time trial to the finish. Not even until the intermediate sprint. Maybe if Coquard and Theuns survive Tinkoff could get a help from other teams.

They have better chance dropping them at Cat 3 climb. We need more detailed profile but it seems to end with a 500m section over 10%. If Valgren and Majka go full genius from the bottom with Sagan on their wheel, Cavendish may have 20 seconds gap at the top.
 
Re: Re:

Lance Armstrong said:
DFA123 said:
Will be interesting to see how Tinkoff play this - now that they have potentially five riders to fully support Sagan. They could try to shell the other sprinters on the Envalira and hold them off all day, but that would require absolutely brutal amount of work, because I can't see many other teams helping them. Probably will wait until that last bump and try to thin out the peloton there instead.

That really long descent to Tarascon is so straight and fast, that it's difficult to see a breakaway staying clear, even if they get about 10 minutes on the climb.
Agree, there is no way Tosatto, Bodnar, Gatto and Valgren could drop sprinters and time trial to the finish. Not even until the intermediate sprint. Maybe if Coquard and Theuns survive Tinkoff could get a help from other teams.

They have better chance dropping them at Cat 3 climb. We need more detailed profile but it seems to end with a 500m section over 10%. If Valgren and Majka go full genius from the bottom with Sagan on their wheel, Cavendish may have 20 seconds gap at the top.
Technically you don't need to actually drop Cav and other pure sprinters. The screwing up of their positioning may be enough so even if they survive this 3rd cat. they still need to be at the front as the descent ends only 3km from the finish line. These 3km are straight but the speed will be high which may not be helpful for sprinters who lost some ground. And this hill seems to be quite tough as guys like Ullrich or Vino managed to create a selection which lasted to the finish.
 
Re:

Alpe d'Huez said:
I don't like stages like this. We end up with a massive fight at the start, which rarely means anything to GC. There's often a re-grouping, followed by a break near the end with a group of a dozen or so trying to get away, and a Cat 3 climb at the end dropping the pure sprinters from winning. In the end, you feel like it was a waste of a good climb up the Envarali, and a waste of the Henri Desgrange. The only hope is that tired or soft legs on riders lead to some splits at the end. But on a Cat 3 climb?
You shouldn't consider this stage to be of impact on the GC. This climb isn't used for the GC, it's used for the dynamics of this stage.

It's used to create a race between attackers and sprinters.
 
Re: Re:

Kwibus said:
Alpe d'Huez said:
I don't like stages like this. We end up with a massive fight at the start, which rarely means anything to GC. There's often a re-grouping, followed by a break near the end with a group of a dozen or so trying to get away, and a Cat 3 climb at the end dropping the pure sprinters from winning. In the end, you feel like it was a waste of a good climb up the Envarali, and a waste of the Henri Desgrange. The only hope is that tired or soft legs on riders lead to some splits at the end. But on a Cat 3 climb?
You shouldn't consider this stage to be of impact on the GC. This climb isn't used for the GC, it's used for the dynamics of this stage.

It's used to create a race between attackers and sprinters.
Right.

This is what a lot of people have in mind when they think of an ideal sprinter's stage. Maybe the final climb a little farther out, or a little easier.
 
Sagan HAS to go in the break if he wants anything from this stage. Tinkoff should try to send Majka and the likes of Kiserlovski or Valgren with Sagan in the break.

This should suit GVA perfectly and Alaphillippe as well.
 
tinkoff attack on the first climb is 100% sure,even if it gets all together in the flat part the sprinter trains will be so tired,they wont have energy to keep cav or kittel at the front on the 3rd cat climb...especially with wednesday flat stage i doubt etixx or lotto want to work hard and cavendish is close to a breaking point anyway
 
Aug 16, 2013
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Don't be surprised if guys like Sagan, GvA, Alaphilippe en EBH will be in the early break. Easier scenario then trying to control the stage.
 
Re:

Arredondo said:
Don't be surprised if guys like Sagan, GvA, Alaphilippe en EBH will be in the early break. Easier scenario then trying to control the stage.
Not sure the break is such a good idea for Sagan. Firstly, he'll have all the sprinter's teams chasing him down all day, so probably won't make it and will have wasted energy. Secondly, even if the break does stay away until the latter stages, no-one in it will want to take Sagan to the finish. He would have to be chasing down attacks almost constantly for the last 10-15km.
 
Re:

saganftw said:
tinkoff attack on the first climb is 100% sure,even if it gets all together in the flat part the sprinter trains will be so tired,they wont have energy to keep cav or kittel at the front on the 3rd cat climb...especially with wednesday flat stage i doubt etixx or lotto want to work hard and cavendish is close to a breaking point anyway
I don't think Tinkoff needs to go hard on Port d'Envalira to drop the sprinters.
 

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