2020 Giro Route Rumors

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Against pure, heavy TTers this TT might not be good Evenepoel, but I actually think this an advantage for him compared to the other GC guys. Almost double the distance and the other gc riders are lightweight as well.
 
Against pure, heavy TTers this TT might not be good Evenepoel, but I actually think this an advantage for him compared to the other GC guys. Almost double the distance and the other gc riders are lightweight as well.
If it's super high speed I don't think it's generally the best for the best ITTer to get the biggest gaps, though I haven't really looked at Evenepoel's specific tendencies in that regard. The old one was really hard IIRC.
 
If it's super high speed I don't think it's generally the best for the best ITTer to get the biggest gaps, though I haven't really looked at Evenepoel's specific tendencies in that regard. The old one was really hard IIRC.
The first half of the EC last year was really fast. I believe he rode 58kmh that part. Clearly better than the rest. I don't know if there is a big difference between slightly downhill and tailwind in that perspective.
 
The original ITT was 13k iirc, with a climb at the end. While he may have won the Euro's with a tailwind in the first part, there Dennis wasn't riding. So for the win, this is definitely a bad thing. But for taking time on Carapaz and Yates and the likes, this is a good thing most likely.

I was talking in regards to him taking pink on day one.
 
66 kms of ITT over flattish terrain, a proper amount for a GT (actually I still think this should be an average amount). Looking over the parcours again, this could be as good as it gets. Stages 15, 17, 18 and 20 are crazy good; hopefully there are no cancellations. And now we have ITT stage 1, MTF stage 3, descent finish stage 5, MTF stage 9. Great route!
 
Reactions: Big Doopie
Is the downhill technical or just full on adrenaline fest as if it is twisty Nibali could be the big time gainer.
I have yet to see the detailed profile but it's not like they're coming down from the Stelvio. Monreale is only 300 mt above sea level. There might be a few technical turns at the beginning but I doubt bike handling will make much of a difference once they leave the town.
 
Going with the GT's for a moment, with this Covid stuff still hanging around, is there a cut off point that if a race has to be cancelled due to the virus, will the result stand or be thrown into the bin? I.E a certain percentage of the race say 80% needs to be completed for a full result to remain or if the race is cancelled after 5 stages then it is scrapped. I'm not sure if there is a certain rule anyways without the Covid stuff.
 
Not good for Evenepoel.
not sure.

it will all be about aero-ness at those speeds. and, frankly, there is no one who gets more aero.

at the versailles ITT in 1989, no one thought Lemond could make back the time, partly because the course was slightly downhill. however, it was precisely the difference in aero-ness (new word by the way) that made the difference.
 
not sure.

it will all be about aero-ness at those speeds. and, frankly, there is no one who gets more aero.

at the versailles ITT in 1989, no one thought Lemond could make back the time, partly because the course was slightly downhill. however, it was precisely the difference in aero-ness (new word by the way) that made the difference.
Yes you're right, i had been debatingen that with my brother earlier today. Whatever he loses due to weight, he might gain due to aerodynamics.
 
Reactions: Big Doopie
Why is it that Galilei's observations don't apply to bikes?
Galilei's law of the free fall is only valid when air resistance is negligable, for example in a vacuum or at very low speeds. Assuming a cyclist with a set frontal area and cd-value he will have a certain air resistance. On a downhill with no pedalling the force accelerating the cyclist is proportional to his mass. The force decelerating is the wind resistance, which is independant of mass. As a result, if a cyclist would add mass to his bike without increasing frontal area or the cd-value, he would reach a higher top speed on a straight downhill.
 
I get the physics behind it and all, but I still genuinely don't think adding weight is actually legit tactic. If it was a streight TT with a constant 6-7% descent, sure, it would definitely pay off.
But it's probably gonna be a much lower gradient where extra weight is gonna gain you hardly anything. Meanwhile there are surely gonna be many turns through which you are gonna be much slower with extra weight and every acceleration is gonna be much harder without a usual TT bike.
 
Reactions: Sestriere

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