Badzilla, the disease of champions

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Aug 5, 2012
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BroDeal said:
Hold it. Now he is claiming he was diagnosed in 2009?
If you look at the quotes in the link bewildered posted, he has mentioned 2009 before but there is some confusion/contradiction over the date as well.
 
Jul 15, 2013
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He said he was diagnosed 'I think it was the end of 2009 actually' in Dec 2012. Today is the second time he has referred to 2009 as the date of his first diagnosis. Every other time he has referred to the end of 2010 and the passport testers informing him for the first time.

He has twice stated that he 'probably' had it for a year before they found it. He is being inconsistent again but it's an inconsistency that was there before anyway.

maybe an attempt to rewrite history or perhaps to close off questions about the unexplainable recurrence of this normally routinely treated disease.
 
I'd love to hear what some of those from the early conversations who have experience with bilharzia think about someone living with bilharzia undetected for 5 years yet still being able to show in training power outputs so high that everyone around him knew he was capable of dominating the tour de France.
 
The Hitch said:
I'd love to hear what some of those from the early conversations who have experience with bilharzia think about someone living with bilharzia undetected for 5 years yet still being able to show in training power outputs so high that everyone around him knew he was capable of dominating the tour de France.
LOL
so true Hitchey :D

undetected for five years!!
 
Apr 20, 2012
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The Hitch said:
I'd love to hear what some of those from the early conversations who have experience with bilharzia think about someone living with bilharzia undetected for 5 years yet still being able to show in training power outputs so high that everyone around him knew he was capable of dominating the tour de France.
http://www.patient.co.uk/health/schistosomiasis-leaflet

''Chronic schistosomiasis
This is more common than acute schistosomiasis. Chronic means 'persistent' or 'ongoing'. If you have chronic schistosomiasis, you can first develop symptoms many months or years after you were first infected. It can cause long-term ill health.

The symptoms depend on the species of schistosoma that you have and where this species produces most of its eggs. Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma japonicum tend to produce eggs in the blood vessels around the bowel. Schistosoma haematobium tends to produce eggs in the blood vessels around the bladder. The symptoms are caused by your body's immune system reacting against the eggs that the worms produce, not by the worms themselves. This reaction can cause inflammation and scarring of the tissues and organs of the body.

If eggs are mainly produced in the blood vessels around the bowel, symptoms can include bloody diarrhoea and tummy (abdominal) pain which tends to be cramping. If they are produced in the blood vessels around the bladder, symptoms can include blood in your urine and pain on urinating.

Eggs that have not been excreted by the body can also travel to other parts of the body and cause symptoms. For example, your liver, lungs, heart, brain or nervous system may be affected. Symptoms depend on the affected area but can include:

Breathlessness.
Cough.
Palpitations.
Chest pain.
Liver failure.
Seizures.
Confusion.
Paralysis (if the spinal cord is involved).
Children who are repeatedly infected with schistosomiasis can develop anaemia, malnutrition, and learning difficulties.''


Good thing the guys organs werent affected in those FIVE years...

I sense a Disney film coming.
 
Not sure how he thinks he is cured.

If you keep going back to the source then you can be reinfected.

Like the common cold. There's no cure and if you're others with the virus then it can be caught again.

So if he keeps swimming in Kenya then he might get it again.
 
thehog said:
Not sure how he thinks he is cured.

If you keep going back to the source then you can be reinfected.

Like the common cold. There's no cure and if you're others with the virus then it can be caught again.

So if he keeps swimming in Kenya then he might get it again.
This deserves some disambiguation. Some of the reinfection rates in the public health research I read was due to the lack of consistent health care follow-up AND being exposed to the opportunity to be infected. The same is true for many of the consequences of Badzilla. Froome's case is none of those things.

Still, you are right. It's a great excuse if the PED's are working quite as well in early 2014 to claim Badzilla reinfection, then miraculously transform for a TdF none of his competitors are entering.
 
Bumping this thread. People discussing it in the Sky thread should have a read, there are a lot of answers to the questions floating around in that thread.

It's not that long of a thread, seems reasonable to take the time to read it if you're interested enough in the topic to keep bringing it up in the Sky thread.
 
Jul 21, 2012
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red_flanders said:
Bumping this thread. People discussing it in the Sky thread should have a read, there are a lot of answers to the questions floating around in that thread.

It's not that long of a thread, seems reasonable to take the time to read it if you're interested enough in the topic to keep bringing it up in the Sky thread.
What are your thoughts on the badzilla? Made up? legit? somewhere in between?
 
Sep 29, 2012
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the sceptic said:
What are your thoughts on the badzilla? Made up? legit? somewhere in between?
Realising you asked someone else ;)

It seems plausible, however the waters become increasingly muddy the more conflicting the stories are unearthed regarding its discovery.

The story that really tipped me over the edge of wtfery was de Jongh or someone similar saying they discovered the Bilharzia through perusing Froome's training & racing diary. JFC what an absolute crock of brown stinky crap that made the rest of it look. Like de Jongh was some Kenyan parasitic diseases expert or something ffs.
 
Feb 19, 2014
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Dear Wiggo said:
Realising you asked someone else ;)

It seems plausible, however the waters become increasingly muddy the more conflicting the stories are unearthed regarding its discovery.

The story that really tipped me over the edge of wtfery was de Jongh or someone similar saying they discovered the Bilharzia through perusing Froome's training & racing diary. JFC what an absolute crock of brown stinky crap that made the rest of it look. Like de Jongh was some Kenyan parasitic diseases expert or something ffs.
It wasn't de Jongh,it was Julich,that other well known paragon of clean cycling.:rolleyes:
 
the sceptic said:
What are your thoughts on the badzilla? Made up? legit? somewhere in between?
Too many varying accounts to make any sense of it. I would guess he probably had it at some point, and it later got co-opted as a cover story. The problem is that there have been so many accounts it seems clear people are lying about it. I can only think of one reason why there would be so many different accounts of how, when, what effect, and who found it.

Clearly I don't believe the "he got cured and now he's great" narrative. The timelines don't even match up between the various versions of the timeline. Just a ton of BS surrounding it.

More lies, which are move evidence of something being covered up.
 
Sep 29, 2012
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I thought this was interesting:

A letter to the editor of the Zambia Post:

The reported increase in bilharzia cases in Lusaka's N'gombe township must attract the attention of all the responsible authorities.
This disease is commonly noticed when somebody passes blood in urine.

http://www.postzambia.com/post-read_article.php?articleId=48334
How Froome managed to be infected for years and not pass blood through his urine is pretty damn miraculous imo.
 
Dec 21, 2010
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Dear Wiggo said:
I thought this was interesting:

A letter to the editor of the Zambia Post:



How Froome managed to be infected for years and not pass blood through his urine is pretty damn miraculous imo.
He was, but they did not see it, as they are all wearing rose-tinted glasses to help overcome their collective dyslexia.....:eek:
 
Dear Wiggo said:
I thought this was interesting:

A letter to the editor of the Zambia Post:

How Froome managed to be infected for years and not pass blood through his urine is pretty damn miraculous imo.
There are two types of bilharzia, or schistosomiasis as it's also called: intestinal (Schistosoma haematobium) and urinary (Schistosoma mansoni).

Froome probably had intestinal schisto? It has probably been covered elsewhere around here.
 
Sep 29, 2012
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DJ Sprtsch said:
There are two types of bilharzia, or schistosomiasis as it's also called: intestinal (Schistosoma haematobium) and urinary (Schistosoma mansoni).

Froome probably had intestinal schisto? It has probably been covered elsewhere around here.
The worms are switched around
intestinal = (Schistosoma mansoni)
urinary = (Schistosoma haematobium)

They have never said which one he had, and given the eggs apparently have distinct shapes, I am guessing it could have been determined.

Either way, the symptoms he experienced are incredibly mild given the range of symptoms available.
 
May 26, 2010
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Dear Wiggo said:
The worms are switched around
intestinal = (Schistosoma mansoni)
urinary = (Schistosoma haematobium)

They have never said which one he had, and given the eggs apparently have distinct shapes, I am guessing it could have been determined.

Either way, the symptoms he experienced are incredibly mild given the range of symptoms available.
That there are 2 distinct strains, I would imagine Froome/sky would know which one he had/has but that they have not said makes it more of a smokescreen. It will be interesting if Walsh gives it enough attention to mention ( or even bother to investigate) which strain he had/has.
 
Sep 29, 2012
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Benotti69 said:
That there are 2 distinct strains, I would imagine Froome/sky would know which one he had/has but that they have not said makes it more of a smokescreen. It will be interesting if Walsh gives it enough attention to mention ( or even bother to investigate) which strain he had/has.
Maybe he mentions it in his book? ;)

There are 5 distinctive types, apparently, but only 2 in South Africa :D
 

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