Bassons: The most eloquent perspective...

Page 3 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
A

Anonymous

Guest
TexPat said:
This supports my generalization developed from living in France, that on the whole, they are much deeper thinkers who possess remarkable reasoning skills as well as eloquence.
+1

The message you have entered is too short. Please lengthen your message to at least 10 characters.
 

Skandar Akbar

BANNED
Nov 20, 2010
177
0
0
FoxxyBrown1111 said:
Skandar Akbar

Take your BS view, your BS name and your BS picture. You are not welcome here...

OMG, you REALLY MADE ME ANNOYED.

To the Admin: Forgive me for my harsh words. But the truth about this Pos(t)er had to be said.

Thanks
I want to apologize right up front for my offensive opinion that has ruffled the feathers of thelong standing and righteous denizens of the clinic. When somebody like foxxybrown with avatar of alcoholic Jim Mcmahon gets one ones case it is time for self reflection. Maybe Bassons can put Mcmahon's life in perspective as well. I wait on the edge of my seat.

Again, I apologize for the pain and misery though my opinion does not seem to be outside the rules. It is the unwritten rules of the pious that count, and I get the message. Take care and good night.
 
You can't have an opinion on anything without ruffling someone's feathers, and having any opinion on doping in sports is guaranteed to **** off someone. That said, I think Bassons has come about as close to words that everyone can respect as humanly possible.

"I understand what you did, and if I had truly been in your shoes, with all that entails, I would have done it, too. But there are still consequences for what you did, and I think you should suffer those consequences."

In a way, Greg said the same thing. He once said that if he been just beginning his career, instead of near the end of it, when EPO emerged, he might have succumbed to the temptation. That he could understand young riders taking it.

All that said, we need devils as well as angels. When the dust clears, Landis may do more for anti-doping than Bassons has.
 
Jun 16, 2009
860
0
0
I read the article with Bassons today and i thought even if you disagreed with his perspective people would still appreciate how diplomatic and respectful he was to others.
THen i came to this thread and thought"how could you possibly interpret his profoundly respectful manner as ego?" ad some of these other trolling comments.
Oh i realized i had forgotten to log in
once that ignore list kicked in i realized it was just the same old haters & trolls up to their shennaigans.
I really wanted to believe that Lance supporters had some degree of perspective and could appreciate the fact that Bassons was non judgemental in regards to their hero. Even after Lance was so blatant in his mission to silence Bassons. I mean c'mon no one could possibly look at Lance's behaviour and say he was not intimidating Bassons. You tell someone they should go home for exercising their opinion? How is that not a hater, oh let me guess he was only trying to protect Bassons from the "true" haters. "hey Chris its not me but alot of these other guys are out to get you, personally i have nothing but love for you but ya know for your own safety i think you should ,well, head home. I mean i think i saw a couple of the italian guys with guns this morning...
 
Jun 19, 2009
5,220
0
0
Balabar said:
Christophe Bassons is a class act through and through.

Cycling needs more people like him. Actually I take that back, society as a whole needs more people like him.


Thanks for the much needed sentiment. Bassons reminds me of many former teammates that gave up the sport rather than be pressured into the narrow machine that was USA Cycling, Montgomery Subaru, 7-11, Motorola, USPS, etc.
 
Jun 19, 2009
5,220
0
0
Skandar Akbar said:
To me he sounds like the pot and lsd induced flower talk from the 60's. I would be curious if the drug control place he works at requires urine tests for its employees.
Skandar-stupid is as stupid does. You do it, dude.
 
Dec 7, 2010
5,507
0
0
Berzin said:
Wow. the Bassons interview was beautiful. Worth a hundred Vaughters or Riis interviews any day of the week.
Agreed. 100%. I just went back to re-read it in its entirety. Really moving.

I then followed the link to Bassons' 1999 article:
http://autobus.cyclingnews.com/results/1999/jul99/jul18.shtml
Christophe Bassons: "I was alone in my own team"

Bassons noted that he had "upset certain teams" with his earlier statements and said that he knew that "personally, that mean't that they would never have allowed me to win a stage. They would always work against me no matter what. But he said that they also made me understand that this was also the case for my own team members."
It's a very telling article that gets to the true heart of the problem: complicity between the riders themselves and those who run the show. Sad. I can only imagine what Bassons was up against.

This from Leblanc:
"Jean-Marie Leblanc did not think that the retirement of Christophe Bassons made him a "martyr" Leblanc said: "As a matter of fact, I think there is a bit of self-promotion by Bassons out of the whole thing."

"The rider upset his fellow riders in the peloton and hinted that the progress we have made to clean up the sport was unsuccessful. He irritated the peloton by using his tongue to get media attention instead of his legs."
It really is disgusting to consider. And as if that wasn't enough, the article below has this bit of wisdom from Jean-Marie. Keep in mind, this is from 1999
Jean-Marie Leblanc estimates that EPO has almost or perhaps disappeared from the Tour and also acknowledges that he has been surprised by the performance of Richard Virenque.
No wonder Christophe Bassons didn't stand a chance. He was too good for a sport that, in the end, didn't deserve him. I am inspired by his thoughts and words, and yet left more discouraged that any meaningful, transformative change is even possible within cycling.
 
Sep 8, 2009
155
0
0
Skandar Akbar said:
I want to apologize right up front for my offensive opinion that has ruffled the feathers of thelong standing and righteous denizens of the clinic. When somebody like foxxybrown with avatar of alcoholic Jim Mcmahon gets one ones case it is time for self reflection. Maybe Bassons can put Mcmahon's life in perspective as well. I wait on the edge of my seat.

Again, I apologize for the pain and misery though my opinion does not seem to be outside the rules. It is the unwritten rules of the pious that count, and I get the message. Take care and good night.
It's not your opinion that has ruffled feathers. It's the fact that 99.9% of your responses in this thread are stupid To be frank, you haven't even stated a reasonable opinion regarding the subject matter.
 
Apr 9, 2009
1,916
0
0
Bassons -- what a good guy. A man clearly at peace with himself and his place in the world. He'll never allow himself to be called a hero because he won't allow himself to be characterized as grandiose. He's a decent man in a world lacking decency, and he knows that all he did was make the "right" choices, the choices that were right for him and the choices that don't contribute to a cycle of negativity in the world. He's surprised that anyone would be impressed by him and apparently he's not even cynical that there aren't more impressive people in this world! As I said, seems like a really good guy.
 
Jun 22, 2009
794
0
0
Merckx index said:
All that said, we need devils as well as angels. When the dust clears, Landis may do more for anti-doping than Bassons has.
what's bolded is a fantastic mental exercise. i had some closely related thoughts after reading the bassons quotes. there are some major differences between these two but there are certainly similarities. early in the kimmage interview landis mentions the importance of having a sense of self outside of bike racing. he implies that his self worth was never conditionally tied to his athletic success. his motivation was always somewhat intrinsic - i believe he was certainly searching for the first place paycheck but also a sense of accomplishment.

both, at least in 2011, are self-aware. it just seems that one picked it up right away and the other had to do things the hard way. :(
 
Jun 1, 2010
63
0
0
Granville57 said:
Agreed. 100%. I just went back to re-read it in its entirety. Really moving.

I then followed the link to Bassons' 1999 article:
http://autobus.cyclingnews.com/results/1999/jul99/jul18.shtml


It's a very telling article that gets to the true heart of the problem: complicity between the riders themselves and those who run the show. Sad. I can only imagine what Bassons was up against.
The really, really sad thing is that nothing has changed. The number of riders who speak out against doping, at least in a meaningful way, is virtually zero. Everyone is innocent until they have appealed at least 3 times against a doping verdict, by which time they can return in about 6 months.

There is no real anger against dopers for robbing other riders of victories, just the occasional complaint that the process takes too long (eg. Cancellara Olympic silver medal).

Beautiful sport, but the highest level of competition is depressing me at the moment.
 
Apr 29, 2009
35
0
8,580
live and let live

What a character. Good on you Basson. Your cycling career was miles above armstrongs in my eyes.

Poerty..
“To me, courage is all about overcoming fear, and I was never scared. I was just lucky - I’d had a balanced upbringing, lots of love in my life, and no void which made me want to dope. Refusing to take drugs was easy for me, whereas other people have things missing in their lives which mean that’s not the case. Doping is always a response to a void, a need – whether it’s for money, or success, or love, or something else. That’s why it’s a mistake to fight the war on doping in terms of health – because, if you actually analyse it, doping responds to a need there too, because you can be healthier doing the Tour de France on drugs than without anything.”
 
Sanitiser said:
I'd say Bassons is more Tao than zen
Nope, not detached enough.

The diplomacy in his comments probably demonstrates a level of being "beyond" a former profession (rather than cynical indifference), which, unlike a Landis, is something Bassons has the luxury to enjoy not having been caught up in some developing tempest.

Of course he retired of his own will at 27 mind relatively at rest, while the latter saw his career prematurely ended with a whole closet full of demons to contend with. Bassons evidently had no need to fight more than his impecable ethics did while he raced, which is a victory for himself and anybody who desires a clean sort.

Landis could only confront and expunge those demons by choosing to speak out, with all the risks that entailed and with no guarantee that victory will be assured. To me there is nobility and courage in both chosen paths.
 
Jul 19, 2010
347
0
0
Balabar said:
Christophe Bassons is a class act through and through.

Cycling needs more people like him. Actually I take that back, society as a whole needs more people like him.
I'm convinced that society is full of people who think this way. However, very few of them are visible in the media. The reason is simple. Someone who thinks this way doesn't often do the things necessary to secure that visibility. When the joy of the thing is in doing the thing rather than in being celebrated for having done the thing, the latter seems unimportant. For the most part, the outward success of celebrity comes to the lucky and the dishonest, and for every star there are many others who in some sense are just as good, but have not made the same sacrifices (not all sacrifices are good).
 
Jan 11, 2011
21
0
0
Paco_P said:
I'm convinced that society is full of people who think this way. However, very few of them are visible in the media. The reason is simple. Someone who thinks this way doesn't often do the things necessary to secure that visibility. When the joy of the thing is in doing the thing rather than in being celebrated for having done the thing, the latter seems unimportant. For the most part, the outward success of celebrity comes to the lucky and the dishonest, and for every star there are many others who in some sense are just as good, but have not made the same sacrifices (not all sacrifices are good).
Very well put.
 
rhubroma said:
I only found his position on Armstrong inconsistent.

First he says he has no intention of judging him, then he states: "So I hope that he has the mental resources and the money to deal with the consequences of what he’s done all these years, I really do. But I also hope that truth comes out."

For someone who claims to be without regrets, his passive-aggressiveness would seem to suggest that all is not as it would appear.

Not that he's not entitled to having the satisfaction of being vindicated.
I don't see the two statements as mutually exclusive.
He clearly doesn't leap to judge those who cheat, rather he offers us various rational.
I would suggest he is addressing the bigger picture by wanting the truth to come out.
I don't think vindication has ever been a priority of Bassons, judging from his profile, or lack of, post retirement.

Maybe Edith Piaf used to sing that which best describes Christope's philosophy?
 
Mar 18, 2009
745
0
0
Paco_P said:
I'm convinced that society is full of people who think this way. However, very few of them are visible in the media. The reason is simple. Someone who thinks this way doesn't often do the things necessary to secure that visibility. When the joy of the thing is in doing the thing rather than in being celebrated for having done the thing, the latter seems unimportant. For the most part, the outward success of celebrity comes to the lucky and the dishonest, and for every star there are many others who in some sense are just as good, but have not made the same sacrifices (not all sacrifices are good).
Very nicely put. Thanks!
 
Granville57 said:
Agreed. 100%. I just went back to re-read it in its entirety. Really moving.

I then followed the link to Bassons' 1999 article:
http://autobus.cyclingnews.com/results/1999/jul99/jul18.shtml


It's a very telling article that gets to the true heart of the problem: complicity between the riders themselves and those who run the show. Sad. I can only imagine what Bassons was up against.

This from Leblanc:


It really is disgusting to consider. And as if that wasn't enough, the article below has this bit of wisdom from Jean-Marie. Keep in mind, this is from 1999


No wonder Christophe Bassons didn't stand a chance. He was too good for a sport that, in the end, didn't deserve him. I am inspired by his thoughts and words, and yet left more discouraged that any meaningful, transformative change is even possible within cycling.
If only:

According to Christophe Bassons, there had been one day where a number of riders wanted to rebel against the drugs. This was the day when Lance Armstrong won the stage from Le Grand Bornand to Sestrières.
 
Jun 1, 2010
63
0
0
thehog said:
If only:

According to Christophe Bassons, there had been one day where a number of riders wanted to rebel against the drugs. This was the day when Lance Armstrong won the stage from Le Grand Bornand to Sestrières.
..and thus it became obvious to everyone that drugs were rife.

At this point though he wouldn't have had anything like the power of the other riders he gained later after winning multiple tours, being a hero cancer survivor, major source of increased funding for the sport etc so there must have been many, many others who were just as unwilling to see the end of the Omerta.
 
Aug 30, 2010
116
0
0
andy1234 said:
I think its a European vs US thing.
Its one of the reasons that your average man in the street in Europe has a far less black and white view on doping.
far less black/white view on everything...
 
Mellow Velo said:
I don't see the two statements as mutually exclusive.
He clearly doesn't leap to judge those who cheat, rather he offers us various rational.
I would suggest he is addressing the bigger picture by wanting the truth to come out.
I don't think vindication has ever been a priority of Bassons, judging from his profile, or lack of, post retirement.

Maybe Edith Piaf used to sing that which best describes Christope's philosophy?
His statements provided a perspective that fits within the context of moral relativism, which simply hasn't stated anything new, nor has it shed light for me on an issue that has always appeared to be anything but "cut and dry".

For example when he talks about distinguishing between "illegality" and "legality":

Bassons says that, while the public, media and authorities view doping in terms of “legal” and “illegal”, an athlete will often superimpose his own ideas of what is legitimate and what is not. Landis, for example, told Kimmage that, for him, doping was a means – the only means in a sport allegedly riddled with corruption – to realize a Tour de France dream.

“I don’t know why Landis had that dream, why he needed that, or indeed why he lied for all those years – you’d have to look at his upbringing, his values – but there’s always something behind it,” Bassons argued.

“Everyone has their own sense of legitimate and illegitimate, which is different from what is licit and illicit. For example, I might think it’s legitimate to drive my car at 90kph in an 80kph zone, if me being late means that my son will walk out into the school playground and not see his dad. For Richard Virenque, doping was legitimate because, for some reason, he needed the love and admiration of the public. For some riders from Eastern Europe it’s legitimate because they need money for their families – which is hard to condemn...


Don't get me wrong, he has expressed himself with eloquence and dignity and I admire him for that. But there was nothing earth shatering to it.

In light of the omertà that has crippled this sport, I was left feeling that he probably understands that this is an ongoing struggle that is being faught by others. If thus there was one aspect that left me wanting, it was that given the present storm that has invested cycling, first with Landis-Armstrong and second with Contador, Bassons would have caught the moment to more emphatically support those efforts which are being faught to expose and bring down the omertà.

Of course it's up to him to react as he sees fit, though in times like these another strong voice of condemnation (not of individual dopers, of whom he clearly wishes to pass no judgment), but on the mafioso like system that certainly makes the possibility of rider conducting himself as he did during his career less likely then not, would have been appreciated.

Of course Bassons owes us nothing, though certainly has the right to feel he himself is owed something back from the UCI and those riders, like Armstrong, who perfectly and without scrupples worked the system to their advantage (and his expense). While it is clear he doesn't feel this way towards himself, I would have thought that perhaps, in taking a stronger position, he realizes he just might be helping the next generation of young riders have a more dignified workplace.
 
Nov 23, 2009
649
0
0
I just wanted to say that as a relatively new fan to cycling (last 3 years) this was the first time I'd heard about Bassons and it really inspired me. Thanks a lot for this thread, +100 to all (except for the troll) with all the info on how awesome he is. Keep it coming!

Did anyone read "Positif"? It's a shame it isn't in English. :(
 
rhubroma said:
Nope, not detached enough.

The diplomacy in his comments probably demonstrates a level of being "beyond" a former profession (rather than cynical indifference), which, unlike a Landis, is something Bassons has the luxury to enjoy not having been caught up in some developing tempest.

Of course he retired of his own will at 27 mind relatively at rest, while the latter saw his career prematurely ended with a whole closet full of demons to contend with. Bassons evidently had no need to fight more than his impecable ethics did while he raced, which is a victory for himself and anybody who desires a clean sort.

Landis could only confront and expunge those demons by choosing to speak out, with all the risks that entailed and with no guarantee that victory will be assured. To me there is nobility and courage in both chosen paths.
is this not the poblem...

arguably to have the character that doesn't need to dope you will also have the character to ensure no success at the highest level in cycling

the defining characteristic to achieving success in cycling will de facto lead those at the top end of the sport to dope

because if you don't.........you won't be at the top end of the sport
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS