Bradley McGee says he didn't dope!

May 26, 2010
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David Walsh believes him!

@DavidWalshST

Have just read Bradley McGee story in Sydney Morning Herald and believe him when says he didn't dope. So much for "they were all at it" BS.
Did very little on the road apart from TTs and prologues.

But he didn't dope?

Not so sure, he didn't speak up for Bassons when Bassons called out the dopers.
 
Benotti69 said:
... he didn't speak up for Bassons when Bassons called out the dopers.
before this thread starts Benotti, in 1999 omerta was in full force and NOBODY spoke up for Bassons. In 1999 he was 23, and in his first year as a road pro. And he did not ride in the TdF until 2001. Its not really fair to use that as a yardstick to measure him by.

Of more pertinent interest he is currently a DS for Saxo Bank and the personal coach of Richie Porte
 
Jun 18, 2009
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I believe him

Brad McGee rode for FdJ, one of the French teams that was antidoping and was outspoken about doping throughout his career. And there were never any suspicions around him, unlike some other Australian riders. And lets stick the SMH article up Dopers stole the best years of my life Its worth the read.
 
Jul 8, 2009
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If he was doping... He was on the wrong ****.

On the normal... Not normal scale... IMO his performances are normal.
 
Was he clean? Maybe. I certainly think it was possible to achieve a certain degree of success while clean, and what he did would qualify. At the same time, putting money on any particular rider from that era being clean is very risky.

The article *sounds* believable, that's for sure.
 
Now THATS the article Cadel Evans SHOULD have written, heartfelt anguished and honest.

I find it remarkable that Brad McGee, who is not stupid, has just written an erudite article, and has seen and heard everything there is to know about cycling in a 20 year career on the track and the road, could mention CSC in the same breath as antdoping. It just goes to show that they are either living in a complete isolation bubble, or the jigsaw is far more complex than any of us realise.
 
I'd give him a pass. Can't remember of any mind boggling moments from him and his top 10 at the Giro was due to the friendly parcours. He also rode most of his career for FDJ and only rode for CSC for a year.
Regarding CSC, specially by 2008, I believe there was no team wide doping program and it would have been possible for clean rider to exist.
 
May 26, 2010
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sittingbison said:
Now THATS the article Cadel Evans SHOULD have written, heartfelt anguished and honest.

I find it remarkable that Brad McGee, who is not stupid, has just written an erudite article, and has seen and heard everything there is to know about cycling in a 20 year career on the track and the road, could mention CSC in the same breath as antdoping. It just goes to show that they are either living in a complete isolation bubble, or the jigsaw is far more complex than any of us realise.
I dont equate Bjarne Riis and clean cycling as being on the same planet!

So McGee is not telling us something.
 
Sep 8, 2012
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McGee said throughout his career people came up to him and offered him drugs, everytime he turned them down and did not falter in this stance. Before everyone jumps down his throat with his CSC connection what I think may have happened is that they knew he was against doping so they didnt do it or talk about it infront of him. Its not too hard to keep someone on the outer. I am sure the people that dont dope get found out in the professional peleton and so the dopers keep them on the outer with the talk of doping.
 
Maybe. But I really have a problem wrapping my head around the Millar anecdote, I don't understand that mentality.

If you're a clean rider, and you're aware of the extent of doping in the peloton, and another rider you're in direct competition with, practically tells you straight out he's on something - would you just shrug it off and smile?

I'm willing to believe McGee, but what's with this casual attitude to others' doping even while you realise yourself how much it cost you in your career?
 
Seems he was happy with his own choices and wasn't interested in trying to change what other people did.

That's his perogative but, on reading the article, I think he feels he perhaps could and should have done more.

I can't see why this is worthy of criticism though. He stuck to his own, admirable, principles and concentrated on racing clean for himself. Why should he have bothered making a song and dance about other people?
 
Sep 29, 2012
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Personally think there are more stories he could tell us - like the Millar incident - but the other stories involve people who have not confessed.

Also think it's very handy he's now leaving the scene and can say this sort of thing. Would have loved to see him say this AND stay in the sport. Much rather McGee than Millar or JV spewing their platitudes and trying to assume control.
 
spalco said:
Maybe. But I really have a problem wrapping my head around the Millar anecdote, I don't understand that mentality.

If you're a clean rider, and you're aware of the extent of doping in the peloton, and another rider you're in direct competition with, practically tells you straight out he's on something - would you just shrug it off and smile?

I'm willing to believe McGee, but what's with this casual attitude to others' doping even while you realise yourself how much it cost you in your career?
It would be a lonely peloton if you made enemies of everyone who didn't make the same choices as you. It may even cost you a job. I'd say that's why all the clean riders are not as vocal as they should be. I think this will be one of the things to look for in terms of "progress", until it happens we are going nowhere.
 
simoni said:
I can't see why this is worthy of criticism though. He stuck to his own, admirable, principles and concentrated on racing clean for himself. Why should he have bothered making a song and dance about other people?
Because he was victimised himself personally.

I don't know if it's our place to criticise him for that, but I think it's strange he didn't do or say anything.

eta: @Ferminal: yes, I guess that's true. It's sad though.
 
Sep 29, 2012
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Ferminal said:
It would be a lonely peloton if you made enemies of everyone who didn't make the same choices as you. It may even cost you a job. I'd say that's why all the clean riders are not as vocal as they should be. I think this will be one of the things to look for in terms of "progress", until it happens we are going nowhere.
Agreed - some form of process or mechanism is required. It's a tough nut to crack but if we could, it could be very useful across the board in sport and even corporate settings.
 
It might sound strange but it's not without precedent. Bassons wasn't the only clean rider named at Festina, but he was the only one to take a strong public stance. As for Cofidis, Moncoutié and Tombak never said much.

Some people were not born to be heralds of a revolution or to rally the troops.
 
Oct 16, 2012
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Ferminal said:
It may even cost you a job.
And because of that, change is quite unlikely. At least it will take a long time. There is not much solidarity between individual competitors.
 
spalco said:
Maybe. But I really have a problem wrapping my head around the Millar anecdote, I don't understand that mentality.

If you're a clean rider, and you're aware of the extent of doping in the peloton, and another rider you're in direct competition with, practically tells you straight out he's on something - would you just shrug it off and smile?

I'm willing to believe McGee, but what's with this casual attitude to others' doping even while you realise yourself how much it cost you in your career?
Probably he had seen what happens to riders who speak out against doping a.l.a Bassons and wanted to continue his profession to the best of his ability.
We see this trend with clean riders. Moncoutie and Fedrigo for eg.
 
Ferminal said:
It would be a lonely peloton if you made enemies of everyone who didn't make the same choices as you. It may even cost you a job. I'd say that's why all the clean riders are not as vocal as they should be. I think this will be one of the things to look for in terms of "progress", until it happens we are going nowhere.
Exactly. When Kittel called out Sanchez et al yesterday, he was asked if that would compromise his career. Not anymore, he said. Times were different and as Bassons said himself, not everyone had the choice he had, to step out.

I know it is naive to believe cyclists on their word, but sitting on a grassy knoll with a tin foil hat is incorrect as well. After all, Moncoutie rode for Cofidis and is believed to be clean.
 

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