Bradley McGee says he didn't dope!

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fat_boy_fat said:
And because of that, change is quite unlikely. At least it will take a long time. There is not much solidarity between individual competitors.
Similar argument applies to the people who criticised Millar for tiptoeing round the Armstrong issue in his book. Maybe he knew the truth, or could have made a good guess at it. But while the dark side still have power and influence you're at risk of biting the hand that feeds you.

The landscape seems to be changing to one that supports and celebrates the good guys but there's still a long long way to go.
 

martinvickers

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Oct 15, 2012
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We all would love a revolution - the dopers named, shamed - the clean lauded, - the omerta shattered - all in one neat media friendly eruption.

But real life doesn't work like that - it's a chipping away; attrition; trickle becomes a stream becomes a river. Not as cathartic, sadly, but it doesn't ean it dosn't lead, eventually, to a better place

A few years ago, contador's 'protection' of Armstrong would hardly be noteworthy; they all did that. Tody, his defence of Armstrong, along with other Spanish dopers is treated with contempt, and teams, rightly or wrongly, are tripping over thmesleves to prove, or improve, clean credentials.

You have journalists not afraid to say that the presence of Riis, Vino and Ekimov among the directors is bad news. You have Paul Kimmage defended by the cycling public to the hilt - 10 years ago many, if not most, would have dismissed him as a troublemaker.

This McGee Article, the Kittel comments, even the Hamilton book would have been unthinkable a decade ago.

The arc of moral universe is long. but it bends towards justice.
 
Apr 14, 2010
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spalco said:
I'm willing to believe McGee, but what's with this casual attitude to others' doping even while you realise yourself how much it cost you in your career?
I think he'd heard the Basson stories and thought better of speaking out. Not speaking out may have cost Brad the palmares he could have had, but speaking out would have cost him his job.

Were it not for a dropped chain he would never have won that prologue, with a doper having taken the glory.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SAOQMyBZwkQ

And I've always remembered that attack in Paris, 'Vino Attacks' always talks it up, but it was Brad who made the attack, Vino just countered

12:40 Vino Sitting in; 12:59 Brad McGee attcks

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oI4QfcW7qnY
 
Sep 29, 2012
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simoni said:
Similar argument applies to the people who criticised Millar for tiptoeing round the Armstrong issue in his book. Maybe he knew the truth, or could have made a good guess at it. But while the dark side still have power and influence you're at risk of biting the hand that feeds you.

The landscape seems to be changing to one that supports and celebrates the good guys but there's still a long long way to go.
Please let me know when you find a good guy still riding in the peloton ;)
 
Aug 25, 2012
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hrotha said:
Was he clean? Maybe. I certainly think it was possible to achieve a certain degree of success while clean, and what he did would qualify. At the same time, putting money on any particular rider from that era being clean is very risky.

The article *sounds* believable, that's for sure.
I agree. One of the few Aussies who seem to have been clean. Who knows! Its easier to believe everyone has something to hide. He also came through the Australian track program which has a cloud hanging over it after the Mark French saga.
 
That sounded like like a well thought out yet heartfelt response by Bradley. It is very difficult if not impossible for current riders elaborate like that. Ok. Nice to here from guys like Greilel and Kittel that are the exception. Bradley rightfully should be a little angry, but he doesn't sound bitter. Sounds like he has had his head srewed on right. Retired riders, dopers, however need to read that. And should apologize to all the clean riders that they stole the money from.
The trash coming out of the mouth of Indurain and Mercxx is just that. Trash.
Kudos to Bradley McGee.
 
I do remember McGee being one of the few pro's who really sounded genuinely ****ed at all the accusation's of doping and him inviting journalists to come live with him and watch him train.

Like others, the idea of going to work for Riis doesn't sit well with me.
 
Jul 10, 2010
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hrotha said:
Was he clean? Maybe. I certainly think it was possible to achieve a certain degree of success while clean, and what he did would qualify. At the same time, putting money on any particular rider from that era being clean is very risky.

The article *sounds* believable, that's for sure.
I agree. But on the side of "is it possible" - 1998 Festina, so 1999 everybody chills a bit, things are a bit more undercover. Come 2000, EPO test introduced, everybody keeping things under wraps - the "inner circle" becomes the thing, eh? So it came and went again a bit, but during McGee's time it was always the inner circle, and not so wide-open, eh? Could be. That would fit with what a lot of other riders are saying.
 
Sep 24, 2012
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He certainly buried himself like no other, suffered like a dog often which goes in his favour. I liked his style. I hope he's honest.
 
Sep 6, 2012
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pmcg76 said:
I do remember McGee being one of the few pro's who really sounded genuinely ****ed at all the accusation's of doping and him inviting journalists to come live with him and watch him train.

Like others, the idea of going to work for Riis doesn't sit well with me.
How many bosses do most people really want to work for?
Part of the issue of the sport is that it's a short burn, but a hard one and it leaves little time for other pursuits like studying. Not many cyclists come out the other side with a range of alternative careers.
The insularity of the existence of the individuals is part of what has held the omerta together so long.
But I digress - well done B McG for having the perspective to say what Cadel should have been able to a day or two ago.
I hope you've gone and had a chat to WADA too because if you don't and this happens again you'll regret that too.
 
There is a difference with believing a guy and wanting to believe a guy. Not that its matter either given McGee works for Riis and thus keeping Omertá safe and sound. Either it is this or someone has to accept Saxobank-Tinkoff bank is a role model in the peloton (and i dont think some of the clinic hypocrites are ready to do that just yet).

simoni said:
If thats how you feel then maybe try another sport? Croquet has a good reputation
Yup. Many here should really (and i mean really) look after another sport. Or maybe give up sport as a concept.

Simoni said:
Similar argument applies to the people who criticised Millar for tiptoeing round the Armstrong issue in his book. Maybe he knew the truth, or could have made a good guess at it. But while the dark side still have power and influence you're at risk of biting the hand that feeds you.

The landscape seems to be changing to one that supports and celebrates the good guys but there's still a long long way to go.
The landscape has moved about zero inch from where we were. You now that is true when the likes of Niki Terpstra claiming doping was in the past and this generation has nothing to do with it.

The ghostwriters are just about to write Lance Armstrong as the single evil in a - bullied into submission - peloton.
 
No_Balls said:
There is a difference with believing a guy and wanting to believe a guy. Not that its matter either given McGee works for Riis and thus keeping Omertá safe and sound. Either it is this or someone has to accept Saxobank-Tinkoff bank is a role model in the peloton (and i dont think some of the clinic hypocrites are ready to do that just yet).
Give the man credit for saying and doing something about it.
 
Zam_Olyas said:
Why is that and how are they hypocrites?
I dont want to mention any names (hint: one is on my ignorelist) but you know you are a hypocrite when you are bullying around against others under the pretext of doping when you yourself celebrate a rider who a) is a convicted doper and b) speaking the Omertá language.

That is not cool.
 
No_Balls said:
I dont want to mention any names (hint: one is on my ignorelist) but you know you are a hypocrite when you are bullying around against others under the pretext of doping when you yourself celebrate a rider who a) is a convicted doper and b) speaking the Omertá language.

That is not cool.
Yea, i believe basso is clean now :D he has suck for a long time now :p
 
cineteq said:
Give the man credit for saying and doing something about it.
I´ll give him credit for (if) he as an athlete was clean. And that is pretty strange saying considering it is against the rule doing otherwise. But then working for a guy like Riis as you profession is another story altogether.

There is two sides of the story Bradley Mcgee.
 
No_Balls said:
I´ll give him credit for (if) he as an athlete was clean. And that is pretty strange saying considering it is against the rule doing otherwise. But then working for a guy like Riis as you profession is another story altogether.
Since he stayed riding, it's obvious that he wasn't completely clean [see Basssons]. Nothing is black or white. He deserves credit for wanting to change even if it's not telling the whole truth.
 
cineteq said:
Since he stayed riding, it's obvious that he wasn't completely clean [see Basssons]. Nothing is black or white. He deserves credit for wanting to change even if it's not telling the whole truth.
So following that (imho failed) logic, what does that tell you about Moncoutie?
 

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