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Coolest Names in the Peloton*

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In the middle of Limburg there are also 'dijken' or dykes, to protect from the rivers. There have been some large floods in the past which is why we need them, even in the middle of Limburg :)
I think as a person who is born, raised and living in exactly the middle of Limburg, I'd know
 
Sep 12, 2016
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hrotha said:
RedheadDane said:
But does the town have a dijk?
Or are/were the Dutch as ridiculous when it comes to naming towns? I mean, don't tell me the town is in the middle of the frikkin' Limburg province!
Well, Sint-Maartensdijk is in Zeeland and pretty close to the sea, so the answer is probably "yes". But if you found a town with a name in -dijk that was pretty far inland, it would probably be either because the shoreline has changed, or because the -dijk element somehow retained its more generic sense of "earthwork, ditch".
You'll find "dijken" across the whole country.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05LcPjQv_Is
Watch this video to see what would happen if they were all gone, even in Limburg :D


RedheadDane said:
Then there's Fabio Jakobsen; first name sounds Italian, surname sounds Danish, guy is Dutch - go figure!

Also, according to Chris Anker Sørensen Pierre-Luc Perichon is the best French name ever.

The names you come across when checking start lists; Daan Van Sintmaartensdijk! Hmm... does "dijk" mean "dike"? Would make sense to have it a part of a Dutch name (like Ellen Van Dijk).
Fabio Jakobsen was actually named after Fabio Casartelli. And Jakobsen basically means son of Jakob (biblical name, James in English). The tradition of using -sen in the last name to denote being a son of is also very common in the Netherlands :)
 
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wouterkaas said:
Fabio Jakobsen was actually named after Fabio Casartelli. And Jakobsen basically means son of Jakob (biblical name, James in English). The tradition of using -sen in the last name to denote being a son of is also very common in the Netherlands :)
That's nice.
And of course his surname would be 'Jakobsen' if it's the surname of his parents. I know what the 'sen' part means, just thought it was more a Scandinavian way of making surnames.
 
Apr 22, 2012
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Andzs Flaksis...what the hell :razz: for everybody who thinks Latvian names aren't as cool asi Lithuanian :) See, Der Effe? :)
 
Colombia is producing the best names per capita of any nation

Winner Anacona
Darwin Atapuma
Rigoberto Uran Uran

Basque cyclists, many great names. It depends on one's native language, but they are appealing because of the consonant clusters of K, X, Z, and the accents

Beñat Intxausti
Gorka Izagirre
Amets Txurruka

I kind of agree with the Lithuania suggestion as well. Anyway, most of the 'good names' are probably on others' lists as well but it is indeed an interesting question why some names seem outstanding

Ignatas Konovalovas
Simona Krupeckaitė
Ramūnas Navardauskas

'Lance Armstrong' is a very good name for a cartoon action-hero, and that is for sure one reason why Lance was marketable by corporations
 
Jun 27, 2013
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ClassicomanoLuigi said:
'Lance Armstrong' is a very good name for a cartoon action-hero, and that is for sure one reason why Lance was marketable by corporations
Lance knows marketing. He surely wasn't going to be as marketable under his birth name Edward Gunderson
 
I like the rhythmic flow of some of the Spaniards names especially when all three names are included.

Also from years ago one of my favorites is Dag Otto Lauritzen. Brings to mind a character in a Bond movie.
 
Sep 20, 2011
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RedheadDane said:
Armchair cyclist said:
RedheadDane said:
Realised something; Asgreen has a pretty unfortunate name if you pronounce it in English...
As green as grass, nothing unfortunate in that.
More the first part if you, you know, put the stress a bit wrong…
I’m sure the kids in kindergarten will have a blast.
 
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RedheadDane said:
Armchair cyclist said:
RedheadDane said:
Realised something; Asgreen has a pretty unfortunate name if you pronounce it in English...
As green as grass, nothing unfortunate in that.
More the first part if you, you know, put the stress a bit wrong…
Yeah, then you're not really pronouncing it in English ;)

Besides, nothing unfortunate about an alternative name for a donkey in English: I think you are confusing it with American. :D
 
Oct 19, 2015
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Armchair cyclist said:
RedheadDane said:
Realised something; Asgreen has a pretty unfortunate name if you pronounce it in English...
As green as grass, nothing unfortunate in that.
I hope that was a joke. if not then i really admire your pure heart.

RedheadDane said:
LaFlorecita said:
Roku said:
I find the name "Barnabas Peak" quite funny. It reminds me to a biblical name (Barrabas)
This is one of my favorites as well
Does he peak all the time?
And your heart is definitely not pure ;)

I actually recognize there's a name "Barnaba(s)". Maybe it does have biblical/hebrew origins.

VARIANT: Barnaby (English)
DIMINUTIVE: Barney (English)
DAFQ!? Ok, then i actually recognize at least two Barnabas. All of them are thematically tied to the dinosaur era.
 
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