Cycling - At least it's not distance running

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Jul 10, 2010
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Catwhoorg said:
Of 13 positives (to date) during the Olympics

Gymnastics -1
Weight Lifting -1
Rowing -1
Judo -1 (Cannabinoid)

Athletics/Track and Field - 9
That judo drug test is humorous in comparison. Sheesh - why bother to kick him out? I garontee pot ain't gonna make that boy any better. The reverse might be true.

Personally, I'm thinking this year may be a watershed - where the ability of ppl to use EPO etc becomes widely enough recognized that we get across the board action in all sports. I think the press that Fla swim coach got for calling foul on that Chinese woman shows that this is the case. People are speaking up, and it is getting reported.
 
Nov 16, 2011
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Sigmund said:
As a cyclist I can say it is a huge difference. Cycling is painfull, but mostly internally generated. Yes, you re in pain everywhere, but as barring a crash it is a no impact sport I can easily imagin ethe damage to your muscles in the legs would be entirely different from marathon running.
Starts affecting your bones and joints, that's the issue. Cycling up a mountain will make your legs turn to jello for a few days but you'll recover just fine no matter what(and more so with the right Kool-aid). Distance running, not necessarily the case - you can gain massive injuries that are so painful you can barely walk - your bones actually start to microscopically fracture. Dehydration more an issue too, as it's harder to settle the liquids and you heat up faster with much less wind cooling effect.
 
Dec 7, 2010
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orangerider said:
Starts affecting your bones and joints, that's the issue. Cycling up a mountain will make your legs turn to jello for a few days but you'll recover just fine no matter what(and more so with the right Kool-aid). Distance running, not necessarily the case - you can gain massive injuries that are so painful you can barely walk - your bones actually start to microscopically fracture. Dehydration more an issue too, as it's harder to settle the liquids and you heat up faster with much less wind cooling effect.
cool story Bro. :cool:
 
eleven said:
That's an interesting point. The men's marathon shows no precipitous decline. On the women's side, however, let's just surmise that modern doping started in the mid-1980's. (was the first version of EPO available then?).

In the women's case, the record has fallen by 9 minutes, which is about 8% by my calculation.

The times on Alpe D'Huez fell about the same iirc.

But it is very odd that no similar fall shows up in men's marathons. The women's marathon fall could very likely be due to an increase participation in sport by women - and by women from Kenya, Ethopia etc...specifically.
The first Olympic Women's marathon was 1984 Los Angeles, so I suspect this might explain the fact the womens times have decreased more than the men.
 
Mar 13, 2009
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that swedish academic needs to drink a lim frozen bidon of shut the fu<k up. the swimmers and track athletes from sweden clearly have problems following his ethics, plus the most hated guy in the ATP.
 
Mar 13, 2009
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Darryl Webster said:
looks to me that " alitude " tents and even whole house artifical enviorements are become the new " normal" for many elite athletes. I would not be suprised to find the entire BC Track team used them. Excellent article here. " For the honest athlete seeking the edge, science has become the new drug. Irish race walker Colin Griffin, who will be competing in London, lives in a specially designed house in Limerick -- the only one of its kind in the country -- where the air can be artificially altered to replicate high-altitude conditions. It's like living halfway up Kilimanjaro

Another Irish walker, Rob Heffernan, achieves the same affect using a tent over his bed. It's cumbersome and uncomfortable, he says, but it works.

His wife, a sprinter who'll also be representing Ireland in London, uses it too."

http://www.herald.ie/entertainment/tv-radio/is-science-winning-this-race-3172776.html

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/olympics/19085030
darryl, they just use it as a ruse.

inverted commas r u s e inverted commas

they never actually sleep in it. great product to take to market.

like milan catwalk showing the emperors clothes, new every year, 4 seasons per year. good business if you can get it.
 
Jul 1, 2011
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blackcat said:
that swedish academic needs to drink a lim frozen bidon of shut the fu<k up. the swimmers and track athletes from sweden clearly have problems following his ethics, plus the most hated guy in the ATP.
Soderling? He's retired hasn't he? Hated by cleaner than clean Rafa.
 
orangerider said:
Starts affecting your bones and joints, that's the issue. Cycling up a mountain will make your legs turn to jello for a few days but you'll recover just fine no matter what(and more so with the right Kool-aid). Distance running, not necessarily the case - you can gain massive injuries that are so painful you can barely walk - your bones actually start to microscopically fracture. Dehydration more an issue too, as it's harder to settle the liquids and you heat up faster with much less wind cooling effect.

Another problem with running is that if you continue to run through the pain you are often doing yourself more and more damage, as I found to my cost when I had an Achilles injury and the endorphines kick in. Knowing what pain you can run through and which you can't is the difficult thing.
 
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