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Do You have a bell on your bike

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Mar 19, 2009
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My transport bike still has one fitted, it is a legal requirement here. However the last person to get a ticket had allegedly wound up the policeman who wrote it to the point where he had to do him for something.

I'd support the previous comments about their usefulness on mixed use facilities. On the road you need to shout.
 
Nov 28, 2009
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Bells on road bikes? No way. Completely useless. This is the first i've heard of Victoria Police having a blitz on it though. Must say doesn't surprise me though (Hate those guys). It's interesting that when i was test riding bikes 12months ago, i don't remember seeing any bells on the road bikes in the store and my newie definately didn't have one. So what's next a blitz on bike shops that don't install bells. Stupid Stupid Stupid.:rolleyes:
 
Jan 12, 2010
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an ongoing discussion

About 7 years ago, a good friend of mine published an article on this issue in the Dutch cyclingmagazine Fiets (http://www.fiets.nl). The reactions from the readers on this article were pretty much the same as in this forum. Some were in favour of a bell because of safety, others were disguisted by the mere thought of it. Nothing really changed..
 
Apr 1, 2009
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MTB, I think it's a must. I have scared too many hikers on trails and they some times carry sticks:eek:

Road bike, can't see the point but on a commuter it makes sense.
 
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Anonymous

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bells are just too useless though.. the people down here that cause the problems are the ones who step out in the road last second..

if you ring your bell you will hit them... hands are far better positioned on the brakes..
 
Apr 1, 2009
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Dim and others

I disagree, on flat bar your hands are on the bar and if you are smart you can place it so it's perfect for braking and shifting and bell ringing. Not much you can do if someone jumps in front of you but at the least you can give people a warning.
 
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St. Elia said:
Dim and others

I disagree, on flat bar your hands are on the bar and if you are smart you can place it so it's perfect for braking and shifting and bell ringing. Not much you can do if someone jumps in front of you but at the least you can give people a warning.

and on drops? Actually on flat bar with grip shifts, the bell position is not comfortably near the thumb either..
 
Apr 1, 2009
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dimspace said:
and on drops? Actually on flat bar with grip shifts, the bell position is not comfortably near the thumb either..

True drop bars don't work so well but if your around people on a path are you in your drops? I'm really talking about a commuter here not your race bike (I know that you have an all rounder) but if you are riding through parks on foot paths I would assume you are on your tops of maybe your hoods going at a reasonable speed the least you can do is warn people that you are around. And who uses grip shift any more? I just don't see the harm of a bell on an MTB ( I think it is a must if you ride shared trails) or a commuter.
 
Aug 16, 2009
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St. Elia said:
True drop bars don't work so well but if your around people on a path are you in your drops? I'm really talking about a commuter here not your race bike (I know that you have an all rounder) but if you are riding through parks on foot paths I would assume you are on your tops of maybe your hoods going at a reasonable speed the least you can do is warn people that you are around. And who uses grip shift any more? I just don't see the harm of a bell on an MTB ( I think it is a must if you ride shared trails) or a commuter.

My commuter has drop bars. In crowds I do often ride the hoods however. mostly for the upright position to better see who is stepping out of where. Voice works for me, but the wife has a bell.
 
May 11, 2009
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St. Elia said:
........... the least you can do is warn people that you are around. ..............QUOTE]

I agree - I have a bell on my fixie which I ride locally on some mixed use paths - my observation is that people hearing a bell realize that there is a bike rider behind them - these same people are puzzled or surprised upon hearing "bike back', 'on your left,' or 'excuse me.'
 
Jul 16, 2009
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usedtobefast said:
i wear a Bell helmet. bell no!!!

I also have a BELL helmet ..... cool ...... didnt think of that ... Im normally pretty sarcastic by nature so may I use that line in future if I am stopped by a Police Officer ????

As for my bike .. No .... but doesnt seem to make much difference on our roads ..... I rode with a friend who was banging away on his bell every five minutes at the TDU and didint get anywhere ... I rode sensibly and waiting for the right moment to pass cars/pedestrians etc and still got to where I was going on time........:rolleyes:
 
May 6, 2009
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Mountain Goat said:
Is this a joke?

Since when is it illegal not to have a bell?

Who needs a bell when you ride a road bike anyway? The cars won't be able to hear it...

I would rather Victoria Police keep spending their time focusing on drunken street violence and drink driving over the summer as these are arguably our two biggest issues!

Or Indian students who have been murdered...
 

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