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Doping in Soccer/Football

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Oct 16, 2010
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The Hitch said:
To be fair though, if he goes after an actual star team (like Brazil 2002) then that's a very good start. The problem with Russia wasn't that they were going after Russia but that they were going after nobodies. Gold medal winners that had no prestige and were easy to dismiss.

The reason why the media has to constantly defend their heroes like Bolt or Sky or Radclife is because those sports are somewhat associated with doping.

Football is teflon.

Roberto Carlos usually makes it into worlds greatest ever xi lists. If he gets outed as a doper, and the 2002 Brazil team gets outed as having had a doper when they won it, that takes the teflon off the sport, and the silent majority will wonder whether footballers do dope on a grander scale.

Indirectly, thats bad for Seppelt's German national team. So I support him going after whoever he wants, as long as they are actual dopers who made real money and fame doping, and not nobodies who can't even pay off their mortgage with the weightlifting gold medal.
Good post.

Agree that at least indirectly it could be bad for the German national team.
Can't wait for a Brazilian TV crew to go undercover on Healing Hans' ass.

The problems I had with the documentary:
- the title ("Brazil's dirty games") was kind of suggesting that it's just those dirty Brazilians;
- the program didn't review previous doping cases in soccer. There are plenty, and Seppelt should have mentioned a few, if only to give credit where it's due. He closed the program claiming that his investigation proved that doping is a problem in soccer. In reality though, his investigation merely adds to an already existing body of evidence to that extent.

But apart from that, yes, a very welcome investigation that should prompt some people to take off the blinders.
 
Re: Re:

sniper said:
The Hitch said:
To be fair though, if he goes after an actual star team (like Brazil 2002) then that's a very good start. The problem with Russia wasn't that they were going after Russia but that they were going after nobodies. Gold medal winners that had no prestige and were easy to dismiss.

The reason why the media has to constantly defend their heroes like Bolt or Sky or Radclife is because those sports are somewhat associated with doping.

Football is teflon.

Roberto Carlos usually makes it into worlds greatest ever xi lists. If he gets outed as a doper, and the 2002 Brazil team gets outed as having had a doper when they won it, that takes the teflon off the sport, and the silent majority will wonder whether footballers do dope on a grander scale.

Indirectly, thats bad for Seppelt's German national team. So I support him going after whoever he wants, as long as they are actual dopers who made real money and fame doping, and not nobodies who can't even pay off their mortgage with the weightlifting gold medal.
Good post.

Agree that at least indirectly it could be bad for the German national team.
Can't wait for a Brazilian TV crew to go undercover on Healing Hans' ***.

The problems I had with the documentary:
- the title ("Brazil's dirty games") was kind of suggesting that it's just those dirty Brazilians;
- the program didn't review previous doping cases in soccer. There are plenty, and Seppelt should have mentioned a few, if only to give credit where it's due. He closed the program claiming that his investigation proved that doping is a problem in soccer. In reality though, his investigation merely adds to an already existing body of evidence to that extent.

But apart from that, yes, a very welcome investigation that should prompt some people to take off the blinders.

Another problem, Brazil beat Germany 2-0 in that year's final.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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It was fun to watch the South Koreans run marathons in full sprint mode, game after game.
Until those squeaky clean Germans brought them to a halt in the semis.
 
Jul 23, 2012
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BullsFan22 said:
sniper said:
It was fun to watch the South Koreans run marathons in full sprint mode, game after game.
Until those squeaky clean Germans brought them to a halt in the semis.

This particular world cup's problem was terribly blatant officiating.
It is not unusual for the host nation to gain assistance in this way. The 1966 officials were hilarious to the point where British diplomats working in Uruguay, Argentina and Brazil complained of the anger that the tournament had generated in South America. Not one of the aforementioned three even made the semis.
 
Aug 13, 2016
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Doping doctor Riccardo Agricola, associated with the 90s doping scandal, back to Juventus:

http://www.corriere.it/sport/17_giugno_18/torna-dottor-riccardo-agricola-dirigera-j-medical-juventus-processo-doping-db727076-5398-11e7-8a99-4abe2a560c36.shtml

He'll direct J-Medical, a high-end medical practice owned by Juventus, which is often used by the club's professional athletes.

For those who don't remember or heard of the affair:
Last Friday in Turin's Palazzo di Giustizia, Judge Giuseppe Casalbore sentenced Agricola to 22 months in jail for supplying Juventus players with performance-enhancing drugs, including the banned blood-boosting hormone erythropoietin (EPO), between 1994 and 1998. Agricola was also barred from practising medicine for 22 months and fined €2,000 (£1,390).

Giraudo, who was also on trial, was cleared of all charges. A third defendant, Giovanni Rossano, a pharmacist accused of supplying drugs on bogus prescriptions, agreed a plea bargain with the court and had a five-month custodial sentence reduced to a €5,000 fine.

The trial had its origins in an interview given by Zdenek Zeman, then the Roma coach (he is now with Lecce), who told L'espresso magazine in 1998 that football needed to "come out of the pharmacy", and pointed the finger at Juventus players in particular. It prompted Raffaele Guariniello, a magistrate in Juve's home city of Turin, to launch an investigation. Some of the evidence uncovered was startling.

When investigators raided the club they found 281 different types of drug. Few, if any of them were banned by the International Olympic Committee and no EPO was found. But the sheer quantity of pharmaceuticals told the magistrates that something was amiss. As Gianmartino Benzi, medical adviser to Guariniello, put it, "the club was equipped like a small hospital".

By January 2002, Guariniello felt he had enough evidence to bring charges and club officials were put on trial for the alleged illegal use of drugs by its players. The turning point in that trial came in June this year when two independent experts appointed by the court presented their findings. By any standards these were extraordinary. Eugenio Muller, a pharmacologist, reported that the club had systematically supplied its players with prescription-only drugs, with no therapeutic justification but with the aim of boosting energy levels or speeding recovery after injury.

Among the drugs used were Voltaren, an anti-inflammatory and pain killer, which was used by 32 players. The drug is widely used in football to treat isolated injuries but Muller said that at Juventus the usage was not occasional but planned, continuous and substantial.

Samyr, a powerful anti-depressant, was taken by 23 players, even though "none of these players showed any signs of depression", according to Muller. Neoton, a drug used to protect the heart, was taken by 14 players.
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/the-drug-scandal-that-blackens-the-name-of-juves-team-of-the-nineties-728710.html
 
Feb 3, 2013
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Now they are trying to score some cheap political points by claiming the Russian national team uses state sponsored doping.....

http://www.bbc.com/sport/football/40396598

What they should be investigating instead is how the Russian national team can be so *** with state sponsored doping.
I guess the other nations just "want it more" or something
 
River Plate (ARG) had at least two players doped: Lucas Martínez Quarta y Camilo Mayada. They expect five more (Sebastián Driussi, Jonathan Maidana, Leonardo Ponzio, Ignacio Fernández y Lucas Alario).
Two players per team are tested during Copa Libertadores matches, and they played six games so far.
The substance is a diuretic: hydrochlorothiazide.
Team defense is a "contamination" of a multivitamin supplement.

Now, what is worst:
River Plate advanced in the group round, and they are not excluded after this scandal. On the contrary, the team is rewarded with a surprising new ruling that admits signing 6 players for the next round.

That gives a complete picture of how corrupt is Conmebol (not long ago several officials were captured during the FIFA scandal)
 
Jul 23, 2012
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slosada said:
River Plate (ARG) had at least two players doped: Lucas Martínez Quarta y Camilo Mayada. They expect five more (Sebastián Driussi, Jonathan Maidana, Leonardo Ponzio, Ignacio Fernández y Lucas Alario).
Two players per team are tested during Copa Libertadores matches, and they played six games so far.
The substance is a diuretic: hydrochlorothiazide.
Team defense is a "contamination" of a multivitamin supplement.

Now, what is worst:
River Plate advanced in the group round, and they are not excluded after this scandal. On the contrary, the team is rewarded with a surprising new ruling that admits signing 6 players for the next round.

That gives a complete picture of how corrupt is Conmebol (not long ago several officials were captured during the FIFA scandal)
CONCACAF in 2014 were good value. Even FIFA went after Costa Rica's miraculous energy levels.

https://www.theguardian.com/football/2014/jun/21/costa-rica-fifa-drug-test-italy-world-cup

Two major economies dumped out of CR's group in the space of a week is bad for business.
 
antonshipulin said:
BBC summary titled 'Tevez, Kuyt & Heinze among footballers named in hackers' leak'
http://www.bbc.com/sport/football/41011854

Link to full release in the newsflash
The BBC's "analysis":

There is no suggestion that any of the World Cup TUEs involve wrongdoing - but it may reignite the debate about whether the system can be abused.
I think BBC sport may be more corrupt than Fifa
 
Jul 25, 2016
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Harry Kane is having a bit of a special time these days — 13 goals in September; England Captain; now linked with a £177m move to Madrid. The reason:

"Specifically, Kane has employed a personal chef, who is an expert in sports nutrition, who comes to his house six days a week to prepare healthy food. Kane says that is why he is quicker, stronger and leaner than ever now, better at holding off defenders, and even why he recovered quicker than expected from his ankle ligament injury sustained back in March."

http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/international/harry-kane-england-captain-spurs-tottenham-nutrition-chef-kitchen-2017-goals-a7983456.html
 
Re:

Yokohama said:
Harry Kane is having a bit of a special time these days — 13 goals in September; England Captain; now linked with a £177m move to Madrid. The reason:

"Specifically, Kane has employed a personal chef, who is an expert in sports nutrition, who comes to his house six days a week to prepare healthy food. Kane says that is why he is quicker, stronger and leaner than ever now, better at holding off defenders, and even why he recovered quicker than expected from his ankle ligament injury sustained back in March."

http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/international/harry-kane-england-captain-spurs-tottenham-nutrition-chef-kitchen-2017-goals-a7983456.html
Great find and observation
 
Mar 13, 2009
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https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/sport/football/football-news/garry-oconnor-branded-delusional-drug-12465880

This is Garry O'Connor, a former Scottish International footballer who made a money-spinning move to Lokomotiv Moscow in 2006. He has an impressive rap sheet, hence the accusation he's a 'delusional drug addict'. He's previously failed a dope test with cocaine, been caught in possession of cocaine, obstructed a police officer, and also been accused of insurance fraud when he crashed his Ferrari.

Of course, we know the club's ex-doctor is spouting nonsense when he says you can only do this in a hospital. Some people have managed to do it in team buses and hotel rooms!

Apparently it's caused a stir in Russia, but the Daily Record are fond of hyperbole. I doubt this will get much notice from the more respected press in the UK.

It's not remotely surprising in the least.
 
El Loto said:
https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/sport/football/football-news/garry-oconnor-branded-delusional-drug-12465880

This is Garry O'Connor, a former Scottish International footballer who made a money-spinning move to Lokomotiv Moscow in 2006. He has an impressive rap sheet, hence the accusation he's a 'delusional drug addict'. He's previously failed a dope test with cocaine, been caught in possession of cocaine, obstructed a police officer, and also been accused of insurance fraud when he crashed his Ferrari.

Of course, we know the club's ex-doctor is spouting nonsense when he says you can only do this in a hospital. Some people have managed to do it in team buses and hotel rooms!

Apparently it's caused a stir in Russia, but the Daily Record are fond of hyperbole. I doubt this will get much notice from the more respected press in the UK.

It's not remotely surprising in the least.
The interesting thing about the original interview (which is online somewhere) is that he isn't saying this in the context of a doping confession or similar - it's said in the context of saying how advanced Moscow were and mentions it alongside lots of non-controversial things. While does check himself slightly when saying it, it does seem as though he genuinely doesn't know this is against the rules.
 
Mar 13, 2009
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Parker said:
El Loto said:
https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/sport/football/football-news/garry-oconnor-branded-delusional-drug-12465880

This is Garry O'Connor, a former Scottish International footballer who made a money-spinning move to Lokomotiv Moscow in 2006. He has an impressive rap sheet, hence the accusation he's a 'delusional drug addict'. He's previously failed a dope test with cocaine, been caught in possession of cocaine, obstructed a police officer, and also been accused of insurance fraud when he crashed his Ferrari.

Of course, we know the club's ex-doctor is spouting nonsense when he says you can only do this in a hospital. Some people have managed to do it in team buses and hotel rooms!

Apparently it's caused a stir in Russia, but the Daily Record are fond of hyperbole. I doubt this will get much notice from the more respected press in the UK.

It's not remotely surprising in the least.
The interesting thing about the original interview (which is online somewhere) is that he isn't saying this in the context of a doping confession or similar - it's said in the context of saying how advanced Moscow were and mentions it alongside lots of non-controversial things. While does check himself slightly when saying it, it does seem as though he genuinely doesn't know this is against the rules.
Knowing some of the things he's got up to during his career, I'm absolutely not surprised if he didn't bat an eyelid.
 
Dec 30, 2009
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Gary O'Connor, no surprise he doesn't see anything unusual with injecting. It's a Leith thing. Trainspotting for anyone not getting my very cheap and childish dig at Hibs;)
 
Aug 20, 2016
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That is a very cheap and childish dig at our Leith cousins Ferryman, lol (Aberdeen here btw) ;-)

I think I remember reading that O'Connor actually had a private jet at his disposal whilst at Lokomotiv to take him back to the UK too whenever he required, whilst banking a nice £16k a week. My memory may be wrong however...and apologies for perhaps veering off the topic of doping in Soccerball.
 
I don't think FIFA will pinch or even drug test the 2018 World Cup Players, but I'm going to make the assumption that there are teams and players from Spain, Russia , Germany who are taking some form of PEDs adopted from our sport of cycling.

I watched a few games last world cup, and their recoveries are phenomenal as well as their endurance. I looked at some Spanish players and they appeared quiet fresh going into the 90th minute as if they had the endurance to go on for another 90 quite comfortably. That's not normal.

I also noticed that the average soccer players have taken more from cycling in their overall body shape. They are no longer thick torsos, heavy quads, stocky players but rather thin, lean athletes now. Hmmm ? Another chapter out of cycling I guess.
 

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