Dr. Luis Garcia del Moral, Dr. Michele Ferrari and Jose “Pepe” Martí life bans

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Mar 4, 2010
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Found this El Mundo article from 2009.

García del Moral vive apartado del ciclismo, pero no del deporte. Actualmente dirige el Instituto de Medicina del Deporte de la Fundación Deportiva Municipal del Ayuntamiento de Valencia, donde se ocupa de coordinar la asistencia preventiva de las escuelas municipales y ha seguido teniendo contactos con la práctica deportiva profesional.

Según figura en su currículo, en la temporada 2003/04 fue asesor médico del FC Barcelona y en junio de 2005 se incorporó a los servicios médicos del Valencia de la mano del traumatólogo Rafael Llombart, un médico de familia y un endocrino. Ese cuerpo médico, que llegó para sustituir a Jorge Candel, salió del club sólo seis meses después. Las críticas de los jugadores, muy descontentos con su labor, fueron determinantes en la decisión de Juan Soler de prescindir de ellos.
http://www.elmundo.es/elmundodeporte/2009/11/25/masdeporte/1259142455.html

Google translate says:

Garcia del Moral shuns cycling, but not sport. He currently heads the Sports Medicine Institute of the Municipal Sports Foundation Hall of Valencia, which is responsible for coordinating preventive care and municipal schools has continued to have contacts with professional sports.

As contained in its curriculum, in the 2003/04 was medical adviser to the FC Barcelona in June 2005 and joined the medical services of Valencia from the hand of Rafael Llombart trauma, a family physician and an endocrinologist. That the medical profession, who came to replace Jorge Candel, left the club just six months later. The criticism of the players, very unhappy with their work, were decisive in the decision to Juan Soler without them.
Here's a screencap of LGDM's CV that was taken off IMD's site.



"Asesor Médico de diversos equipos de Fútbol entre los que destaca el Barcelona CF y el Valencia CF."

"Medical Adviser of various football teams most notably FC Barcelona and Valencia CF."
 
Oct 16, 2010
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Tyler'sTwin said:
Seems like a pretty ******* big deal to me. :eek:

Wouldn't surprise me if no one else in the media picked up on it...
The German press is all over it. But they're just jealous of course.

The below is from today, one of the biggest German newspapers, Süddeutsche Zeitung, questioning the Spanish Golden Generation of sports.

http://www.sueddeutsche.de/sport/spaniens-spitzensport-weltliche-hilfe-fuer-die-generation-gold-1.1410286

a snippet of what is very good reading (and long overdue):
Die neuerlichen Doping-Enthüllungen um Armstrongs Helfer gehen weit über den Radsport hinaus, sie betreffen den Spitzensport in ganz Spanien: Fußball, Tennis, Leichtathletik, Rad. Generation Gold nennt sich diese denkwürdige Fügung des Schicksals - doch es könnte auch illegale Gründe geben für die wundersame Dominanz.
TRANSLATION: "the recent developments regarding Armstrong's helpers go well beyond cycling. They concern the whole of Spanish topsports: football, tennis, athletics, cycling. Generation Gold they call it - but there might well be illegal grounds for this remarkable dominance"
 

Dr. Maserati

BANNED
Jun 19, 2009
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Dr. Maserati said:
Correct - unless he was off on holidays in his campervan.

Just to add to this - from the Washington Post:
Ferrari says he wasn’t formally notified of the charges by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency and learned of Tuesday’s ban through the media. A USADA spokeswoman said the charges were hand-delivered to Ferrari in person at his home.
Hat tip to @Tehaspe on twitter
 
Mar 4, 2010
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Ferrari says he wasn’t formally notified of the charges by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency and learned of Tuesday’s ban through the media. A USADA spokeswoman said the charges were hand-delivered to Ferrari in person at his home.


maybe Ferrari took one look at that front page and thought someone was delivering a copy of his black book
 
Jun 19, 2009
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Kender said:


maybe Ferrari took one look at that front page and thought someone was delivering a copy of his black book
Ferrari's address is actually Via Pomposa! Only a serious a*****e like his client would live on that street.
 
Oct 16, 2010
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Great! thanks for the heads-up.
I'm excited to see dots are finally being connected.
The international press picking this up is what we've been waiting for.

by the way, I recently read in one of the related German articles that LeMonde are still considering taking their case (the Fuentes meets FC Barca story over which they were sued for several millions of euros) to the European court.
I assume they're closely following the new developments.
 
From 1995:

CYCLING's world governing body, the UCI, has set alarm bells ringing - along with some hearty unkind laughter - with a proposal to stock the deep-freezer at its Lausanne headquarters with urine samples this season as part of a campaign to clean up the sport's drug-using image.

The idea behind the proposal, which introduces the bogy of retrospective drug testing, is to demand a third specimen - a C sample to go with the customary A and B bottles - from riders undergoing random tests in this World Cup season.

These C samples will be preserved until there are reliable scientific tests to detect the new, banned synthetic versions of natural aids such as the blood-enricher erithropoeitin (EPO), human chorionic gonadotropin (which stimulates the body to produce more testosterone) and human growth hormone (which, like steroids, cuts recovery time).


Such substances have moved firmly to centre-stage because steroid use is now so easily detectable.

With the International Olympic Committee demanding exemplary action in the run -up to professional cycling's entry to the Games in Atlanta next year, the UCI had already introduced new penalties for positives by getting rid of the "suspended ban" for first offences - effectively no punishment at all - in favour of more severe sanctions for "hard" substances such as steroids.

But the official efforts were queered by two high-profile cases last season: the quadruple Tour de France winner Miguel Indurain's "positive but not positive" for the asthmatics' bronchial-dilating drug salbutamol, and the former double world champion Gianni Bugno's three-month ban for use of the stimulant caffeine.

The new retro-testing notion, sinking in as the World Cup got under way with the Milan-San Remo last Saturday, was enough to send the president of the riders' union to Lausanne to protest on his members' behalf in outraged moral terms.

The chairman of the UCI's doping committee, Werner Goehner, is wryly amused by the worries expressed from within the sport. "You'd be amazed at how many team doctors have been in touch, very concerned to find out what we will be doing."

The irony was that the union president Moreno Argentin, the world champion in 1986, had as his personal trainer in his racing days Dr Michele Ferrari, who now performs the same role for Tony Rominger. And last year Ferrari said he could well understand professionals using any substance that was not detectable.

Ferrari was only reflecting the widely held perception that professional cycling is so relentlessly demanding that most men would need to be mad or drugged just to survive in it. The frozen-urine proposals may be mainly to frighten riders into line - or to impress the IOC - but first it may drive them mad.

The Guardian (London)

March 25, 1995

THE FROZEN-URINE ROUTE TO RELATIVELY DRUG-FREE CYCLING;
Extra time

BYLINE: Jeremy Alexander And Chris Curtain

SECTION: THE GUARDIAN SPORTS PAGE; Pg. 19
 
NYT 1993:

CYCLING: The Bicycle as Hardware; Rominger Tests His Computer-Style Training in the Tour
By SAMUEL ABT
Published: July 10, 1993

http://www.nytimes.com/1993/07/10/sports/cycling-bicycle-hardware-rominger-tests-his-computer-style-training-tour.html?pagewanted=all&src=pm

"Following his victory in the Vuelta, Rominger got with the program by spending a month at high altitude, training and building up his red corpuscles, which carry oxygen to the muscles. Not many riders would throw away a month of their racing season, but off Rominger went to Vail, Colo., accompanied by his family and his doctor, Michele Ferrari.

"I enjoyed Colorado very much," the Swiss rider said. "The weather wasn't so good, too much snow still, but the people were nice. Good training, too. I know me very well; I'm riding such a long time. I know what kind of training I have to do."
 
The Independent (London)

October 23, 1994, Sunday

Cycling: Rominger breaks one-hour record

SECTION: SPORT PAGE; Page 2

LENGTH: 261 words



The Swiss cyclist Tony Rominger smashed the world one-hour record held by his arch-rival Miguel Indurain in Bordeaux yesterday. Rominger, a novice at indoor track racing, covered 53.832km, a huge 792m more than the Spanish cyclist. It was the 33-year-old Rominger's first attempt at the mark, carried out behind closed doors and only regarded as a warm-up before a serious attempt next month. Indurain, the four-times Tour de France winner who destroyed Rominger's dream of winning the race this year, had set a new mark of 53.040km at the same track on 2 September, beating the Scot Graeme Obree's 52.713km recorded in April. ''I knew I would beat it it,'' Rominger said after his record bid, and added that he aimed to increase it to 55 kms next month at altitude in Mexico or Quito. ''I had so much strength left in the end that I think I could have accelerated. I did not suffer as much as I did in recent road time trials,'' he said. Rominger, who rode roughly a second faster than Indurain every kilometre, later said that yesterday's attempt was not as improvised as it seemed. The Swiss has been advised for the past eight years by an Italian doctor, Michele Ferrari. ''For eight years, Ferrari has given me all the clues to beat the record,'' Rominger said. ''I think I can cover one or one and a half kilometres more,'' he said of next month's record bid. But Ferrari was not so optimistic: ''Fifty-five kms at altitude will be very hard to reach. Only a duel between Indurain and Rominger may lead us there,'' he said.
 
Independent on Sunday (London)

July 8, 2001, Sunday

...But this was not the only surprise yesterday. Armstrong's admission in a pre -race interview that the Italian doctor Michele Ferrari, who is currently charged with supplying illegal drugs to athletes (ed. Charge$ were $ub$equently di$mi$$ed), has been one of his advisers for six years was at least as unexpected as Moreau's win.

The double Tour de France winner told the Italian newspaper La Gazzetta dello Sport: "I know Ferrari is believed to be the devil incarnate in Italy, but in fact I have found him to be an honest individual and a great professional." Armstrong denied that being linked to a doctor who is the subject of two investigations by Italian judges for supplying a variety of drugs, including human growth hormone, would badly affect his image.

"Who isn't being investigated right now in cycling?" the 29-year-old said. "I'm being investigated by the police in France. I personally believe Ferrari has been badly misunderstood."

Ferrari was, the Texan claimed, in control of his diet, tests, altitude training and usage of a hypobaric chamber - which creates artificial high- altitude conditions, causing an increase in red blood cell production. The Spanish doctor Luis Garcia Del Moral was responsible for his overall physical condition, he added.

Armstrong also said what he called a limited collaboration with Ferrari would increase as he built up to an attempt on the hour record this autumn: "He is an expert in that area." Many feel Ferrari is the kind of expert cycling could do without.
 
TubularBills said:
Independent on Sunday (London)

July 8, 2001, Sunday

...But this was not the only surprise yesterday. Armstrong's admission in a pre -race interview that the Italian doctor Michele Ferrari, who is currently charged with supplying illegal drugs to athletes (ed. Charge$ were $ub$equently di$mi$$ed), has been one of his advisers for six years was at least as unexpected as Moreau's win.

The double Tour de France winner told the Italian newspaper La Gazzetta dello Sport: "I know Ferrari is believed to be the devil incarnate in Italy, but in fact I have found him to be an honest individual and a great professional." Armstrong denied that being linked to a doctor who is the subject of two investigations by Italian judges for supplying a variety of drugs, including human growth hormone, would badly affect his image.

"Who isn't being investigated right now in cycling?" the 29-year-old said. "I'm being investigated by the police in France. I personally believe Ferrari has been badly misunderstood."

Ferrari was, the Texan claimed, in control of his diet, tests, altitude training and usage of a hypobaric chamber - which creates artificial high- altitude conditions, causing an increase in red blood cell production. The Spanish doctor Luis Garcia Del Moral was responsible for his overall physical condition, he added.

Armstrong also said what he called a limited collaboration with Ferrari would increase as he built up to an attempt on the hour record this autumn: "He is an expert in that area." Many feel Ferrari is the kind of expert cycling could do without.
Thanks.

Yes, brought back many memories but somehow I must be blocking others.

Do you remember how far Lance went in his hour record?

Dave.
 
Aug 27, 2009
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He did wind tunnel tests with a modified Trek track bike but his CdA was too high, even with an aero helmet so they scrapped it.
 
Aug 13, 2009
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Interview with Greg Lemond in De Telegraaph


"That is the most dramatic period of my life. I knew that the lead poisoning could not perform optimally, but I still felt good enough to compete with the top. In 1992 I finished fifth in the time trial in Luxembourg. A few days later I was completely in the rear in the climb to Sestriere. A rider with my talent was there to still be able to use the first two up riding. However, I could no longer compete with the men. "

LeMond wanted to after that tour in Leuven thoroughly investigated. He asked Dr. Yvan Mol advice. "Yvan told me not to myself to look. There was nothing wrong with me. If I wanted to know what was going on, you had to in a doctor Michele Ferrari in Italy. I was not diminished, but the others were suddenly much better. "
 
Aug 13, 2009
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mektronic said:
He did wind tunnel tests with a modified Trek track bike but his CdA was too high, even with an aero helmet so they scrapped it.
Hahaha:D

The "Hour Record attempt" went no further then a 5 minute photo shoot
 
May 26, 2010
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Race Radio said:
Hahaha:D

The "Hour Record attempt" went no further then a 5 minute photo shoot
And the media were suckered yet again. :(

Amazing how the media gets the wool pulled over their eyes so conveniently, it is almost like they provide the wool and do the pulling .
 
MacRoadie said:
Michele just keeps on giving. INTERPOL should open a field office in St. Moritz...
Hey, well he must have not been lying when he said he hasn't had any involvement with cycling in years.

Now we know why, plenty of athletes in other sports wanting some performance training plans!
 
Oct 16, 2010
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with all due respect to schwazer and other athletes on the ferrari list, but you must be pretty damn stupid to continue working with ferrari after the FBI start an international investigation relating (and leading) directly to ferrari and his clients. if I recall correctly, said investigation started in 2010, so schwazer and co. would have had plenty of time to find a another dealer.
this is new evidence (if such was needed) that the intellect of athletes (especially doped athletes) should generally not be overestimated.
 

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