Dylan Groenewegen discussion thread

Page 6 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
Ah ok. So who is his final lead out at the Giro? Dekker is obviously the fastest teammate but usually sprinters want an experienced guy.
Yeah I understand what you are saying, I think Dekker is probably a backup plan and not necessarily a leadout. I would imagine its van Emden's job to make sure Groenenwegen is in a good position before the final k and then he will have to rely on his positioning and take advantage of other teams/sprinters, pretty much like it is for van Aert.
 
Dekker seems like a skillful and handy guy. I don't see the point in bringing both, if not to have Dekker involved in the leadout. Is he supposed to bide his time in the back of the peloton until Groenewegen has a bad day (which more likely than not, he'll only say/know after the stage)? I obviously don't know what the teamorders are, but imho it would make sense for Dekker to lead out Groenewegen. Van Emden/Affini/Martens could lead them into the final 1k. I also don't know if at this time, with the entire Groenewegen situation, it's a good idea to have him pick wheels in the final km's of rivals. Not only is it his first race (and a big one at that), i think for his own good, it would be better to rely on teammates.
That way it becomes a learning experience for Dekker as well. And in case Groenewegen can't do the job, there will be some routine between Dekker and his leadout guys.
 
Reactions: jmdirt
I'm not really sure anybody (even Jumbo) knows if Groenewegen is physically and mentally ready for GT sprints. He's been away from the sport for almost a year and sure has some burden to carry. Dekker might be asked to be the main sprinter in case Groenewegen is not up to the task.
But yeah, I agree he could serve as a leadout if everything goes according to plans with Dylan.
 
Congrats today, while not happy of what happened last year it is good he is back winning after being out for awhile. This is what, 3 for 3 on stages he has contested?
As someone pointed out elsewhere; it would feel more wrong if Jakobsen wasn't yet back to racing, but as it stands, it seems more than likely that Jakobsen will walk away from Spain with at least one stage win in his pockets.
 
As someone pointed out elsewhere; it would feel more wrong if Jakobsen wasn't yet back to racing, but as it stands, it seems more than likely that Jakobsen will walk away from Spain with at least one stage win in his pockets.
Oh absolutely it would be terrible if he was racing and winning even after the suspension and Jakobsen wasn't. It is even better Jakobsen has won as well this year. I think he will get at least 3 wins in Spain as long as Quickstep can control the stage.
 
Reactions: Sandisfan
I never thought I would have said it but I'm glad he's back at his best level (and hopefully Jakobsen too). The general sprinting level was really low in WT races this year and most of the times you were 90% who would win. I need a little suspense for those 4-5 km before the sprint.

Hopefully Ackermann, Gaviria and Viviani can get their act together too so we'll have a crowded tier 1 of elite sprinters again in 2022.
 
Reactions: Sandisfan

There's a video interview in Dutch.

Google translated article:

Following in the footsteps of Dylan Groenewegen: "The fact that Jakobsen is getting back to best form has helped me"

A story of trial and error. Since his suspension - after the fall of Fabio Jakobsen in the Tour of Poland - Dylan Groenewegen has been looking for himself, and for his best form. Our reporter Sammy Neyrinck followed the Dutchman towards his satisfying second place in the sprint classic Brugge-De Panne. "I finally feel like my old self again," said a relieved Groenewegen after the race.

Sammy Neyrinck stayed for the Minerva Classic Brugge-De Panne in the wake of top sprinter Dylan Groenewegen. The Dutchman started the season hesitantly, but again - as usual - delivered a pure power sprint in De Panne. He came just a few millimeters short to beat winner Tim Merlier.

"I suspect Merlier used thicker tires," Groenewegen joked to Sammy Neyrinck afterwards.

Groenewegen's smile spoke volumes. A satisfying result after a period full of uncertainty. Since his suspension - after the horror crash with Fabio Jakobsen in the Tour of Poland - the BikeExchange top sprinter has not yet reached his best form. Until now.

"Sprinting has been difficult for me for a long time," Groenewegen explains. "I've had a hard time being one with myself in a bunch sprint for a long time."

"I no longer dared to take the risks necessary to win and invariably brake when others did not. Everyone sprinted the same when I returned to the peloton, only I had changed. You immediately noticed that in my results."

"I am still my own biggest opponent. Yet I finally feel like I am old again. I will never forget the moment in Poland with Fabio, but I have learned to give it a place. happy and helped me a lot too."

"Fun on the bike again"


Groenewegen changed jerseys this summer. This season he no longer rides in the yellow of Jumbo-Visma, but in the sky blue of BikeExchange. That switch heralded a new start for the fast man from the Netherlands.

"I want to show who I was before my suspension. I lost the fun on my bike last year. But this season I'm looking forward to it again."

"Last year I didn't enjoy optimal preparation either. Then I could accept it if I didn't finish on the highest scaffold. This year the cards are different. I am 100% again and want to prove to myself that I can still do it ."

"Bruges-De Panne was a very nice and important race for me. The top of the sprinters are at the start here. It was an ideal test."

"I'm happy that people can see me as a top sprinter after today," Groenewegen said, visibly relieved after his second place.
 
For me personally, Groenewegen comes across as a nicer guy than before the crash in Poland.

Maybe it is not ideal for a sporter to prioritize sportsmanship over performance. But for a guy who is kinda getting a second chance I think it is great. Now I hope that he will get some great results again. And some nice and fair duels with Fabio in the Tour where both get at least a stage win would be amazing. Might even be a story for a very good documentary that way.
 
For me personally, Groenewegen comes across as a nicer guy than before the crash in Poland.

Maybe it is not ideal for a sporter to prioritize sportsmanship over performance. But for a guy who is kinda getting a second chance I think it is great. Now I hope that he will get some great results again. And some nice and fair duels with Fabio in the Tour where both get at least a stage win would be amazing. Might even be a story for a very good documentary that way.
I can't remember; are both their teams gonna be part of that documentary?
 
That's probably the exact reason Van Aert was so occupied with squeezing Sagan instead of beating Groenewegen.
Maybe before today‘s stage, there was talk between Groenewegen and Wout.

Groenewegen: „Wout, you know, I‘m not allowed to deviate from my line in the finales, any more. So I need you to do this job, and make me win. Today, YOU ride my opponents into the barriers, so I can win the stage, and you get your (favourite) second place. You will be paid 10.000€ for that, from my private money.“…

Wout: „Hey, sounds good! I‘ll do EVERYTHING for a second place, you know!“… ;)
 
Reactions: Sandisfan and KZD

ASK THE COMMUNITY