Hip Discomfort

Jul 14, 2009
273
0
9,030
I'm just getting back into riding after decades off the bike. I've adjusted my bike fit to my current shape and flexibility. It's been comfortable so far. However, the last couple of rides have had my right hip wanting to keep contracting at the top of the pedal stroke. This has been continuing eve off the bike, when I am sitting at the dinner table, any time my hip to upper body angle seems to be less than 90 degrees. Does anyone have any suggestions?
 
Stretching before and after riding is a good idea.
If you have been relatively inactive for a while, I suggest using a rowing machine for about 1 week - at a comfortable pace and effort. Do not exaggerate leg bends or forward lean - just enough movement and effort for minor muscle/tendon conditioning. If you get pops or snaps from ANY joints, ease off to a level that makes them stop.
If rowing machine is not available, then do long duration stretching at an easy level.
 
Jul 14, 2009
273
0
9,030
Diagnosing via a forum is a bad idea, but I would suggest basic flexibility "stretches" after riding. If my quads/IT bands are tight my pelvis hates me. I would also suggest lowering your seat by a few mm.
I agree diagnosing via the forum is not the best idea, I'm just looking for some ideas. I know my mileage will vary
 
Jul 14, 2009
273
0
9,030
Stretching before and after riding is a good idea.
If you have been relatively inactive for a while, I suggest using a rowing machine for about 1 week - at a comfortable pace and effort. Do not exaggerate leg bends or forward lean - just enough movement and effort for minor muscle/tendon conditioning. If you get pops or snaps from ANY joints, ease off to a level that makes them stop.
If rowing machine is not available, then do long duration stretching at an easy level.
I appreciate the advice. I have been using a rowing machine for a few months, no snapping or popping. It's just recently that I've been starting to put in mileage on the trainer that this has started acting up
 
One leg longer than the other or a position on the bike that prioritizes on side more?
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Yes that can have a large effect. In regular 'street shoes' walk on a long straight smooth surface (inside a shopping mall is perfect) and feel carefully how you heels hit the surface - you might notice that they are not exactly the same.
I use an insole cut from a piece of automobile inner tube in one shoe to give a more even heel strike. Even that slight difference in leg length can cause an imbalance when pedaling (as well as when walking or running).
Your hips should not 'rock' on the saddle, and you shouldn't have a feeling of need to 'reach further' with one leg.
 
Reactions: jmdirt
I can't believe that I forgot to suggest rolling your legs after riding. Before all of those fancy $30+ rolling sticks became available an old school USA/Belgian guy that I used to ride with suggested a rolling pin to help my tight IT bands. I still have the $1.99 wooden rolling pin that I bought 25 years ago! After I go though my post ride flexibility routine I lightly roll my legs for a several minutes, and it helps. There is a physiological explanation if you are interested in searching that out. There are a lot of overpriced (IMO) options, but there are also some very affordable options on various e commerce sites, and dollar stores have wooden rolling pins so you can get one even cheaper than I did 25 years ago. :)
 
Reactions: Sciatic

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