How has your Opinion of Vino! changed since Liestong's confession?

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How has your opinion of Vino! changed since Liestrong's confession?

  • Attack!!!

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0
Aug 18, 2009
4,993
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Dissappointing poll options. I too romanticised Vino as a rider in full knowledge he was juiced to the eyebrows. However, the prospect of him going into management :eek: and the Armstrong publicity highlighting my double standard, mean that really I would prefer him out of the sport.

If you think about it, he might be the most similar other rider to Armstrong in terms of personality.
 
Vino is a real **** clearly. Remember that epic fake Vino twitter account someone made that played up Vino as a hardcore Eastern version of Jens Voigt.

Which did nothing but play up his legend.

Vino forced the account to be closed:eek:
 
May 9, 2009
638
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taiwan said:
Dissappointing poll options.
<SIGH>

It was a JOKE!

Mockery of the umpteen "Opinion of..." threads.


I think it's very important for one to acknowledge that pro cycling will never be a completely clean sport, be it riders doping or ex-dopers managing etc.

It's sport, yes, but at the professional level it also becomes entertainment.

And boy did Vino! entertain! :D


p.s. -- just vote 'Attack!!!' and be satisfied.
 
Sep 25, 2009
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karlboss said:
I'll take Vino over Lance. Unrepentant for sure, but I don't believe he sued anyone for saying he's a doper, nor took any other form of action, correct me if I'm wrong. I'm not expecting a confession and if he does, it won't contain an apology.
this has been said b4 and i'm hardly breaking any new ground here...

yes, vino likes attention and is a showman but, unlike armstrong, he has demonstrated a clear respect of red lines, the limits of humanly allowable, doping or not...

let's take some well documented examples...

- at some point vino and kash became enemies. it's a fact, yet vino worked with him both as a teammate and as a manager because the bigger picture of his country's interests was at stake...

- vino is no stranger to getting elevated attention from the better half of the human race. yet, i challenge anyone to find a juicy story about him being anything but a solid family man and a caring father to his 3 kids.

- a doping admission...it may surprise many, but vino actually admitted his doping in a legal setting (granted, not in public) long time ago when he won his case in cas against the uci's demand for paying doping fines.

vino is no saint, he certainly cheated and doped, but he's light years away from the unceremonious, unscrupulous arrogant criminal from texas who never cared about anyone but himself.
 
The "admission" of doping may or may not have had anything to do with the length of the ban.

Given that outstandingly respectful of red lines rider tried to pull the retirement trick he wouldn't have been allowed to complete for further 8 months.

That the UCI suddenly found that he wasn't removed from the testing pool when he admitted sounds a bit hokey.
 
Mar 10, 2009
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Joachim said:
It was a victory for clean cycling!

(he beat those dastardly doping Brits)

:D
The Hitch said:
He beat Uran and a chase group that did not include a single British rider, so the - oh they are all picking on the brits, line wont work here. Stop trolling.
Hey this is the clinic, go to the racing section to talk racing ;)
 
Jan 13, 2010
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Fearless Greg Lemond said:
But, a nice farewell from him at the Olympics at the IOC and the UCI, laughed my a@@ off :D
The way I felt about it, too.
"Badges? We don't need no steenkin' badges!"
 
Dazed and Confused said:
relative to many other dopers perhaps, but Vino is dull compare to many riders pre EPO and blood doping era.
Then I think you need to rewatch the '03 TdF. Vino and Mayo attacked more times in the third week than guys like Leipheimer and Van Den Broeck have their whole careers...
 
Jun 26, 2012
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python said:
this has been said b4 and i'm hardly breaking any new ground here...

yes, vino likes attention and is a showman but, unlike armstrong, he has demonstrated a clear respect of red lines, the limits of humanly allowable, doping or not...

let's take some well documented examples...

- at some point vino and kash became enemies. it's a fact, yet vino worked with him both as a teammate and as a manager because the bigger picture of his country's interests was at stake...

- vino is no stranger to getting elevated attention from the better half of the human race. yet, i challenge anyone to find a juicy story about him being anything but a solid family man and a caring father to his 3 kids.

- a doping admission...it may surprise many, but vino actually admitted his doping in a legal setting (granted, not in public) long time ago when he won his case in cas against the uci's demand for paying doping fines.

vino is no saint, he certainly cheated and doped, but he's light years away from the unceremonious, unscrupulous arrogant criminal from texas who never cared about anyone but himself.
This I agree

He also didnt conn everyone into thinking he had a charity raising money for a good cause only to line his pockets with the money....

Still a *****head though
 
Jan 13, 2010
491
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zebedee said:
Moral relativism in full flow.
Said the man who is totally blameless.

We all cheat but most of us have lines that we won't cross. While we don't condone crossing lines, a few of us can relate to where Vino draws his.
 

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