Is Contador the most popular cyclist ever?

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Aug 4, 2011
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happytramp said:
I'd say Coppi or Bartali were the most popular of all time. They probably had more fans in Italy alone than any other cyclist before or since.
back in 1567 oooooooohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh ageist
 
Aug 16, 2013
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Angliru said:
The Hitch said:
On the other hand, his personality is pretty crap. As far as interviews go, the dialogue in sports video games are more varied than contadors responses to interviews. Same pre arranged answers from gt to gt to gt, from stage to stage to stage. You can summarizes 10 years worth of interviews in 3 or 4 sentences. Starting with an assessment of the etapa as "dura", (muy dura if it's an mtf) then something about sensations, and to conclude, an expression of hope/ contained happiness, depending on whether the stage has already taken place or not.

The closest he comes to expressing any emotion is the photos he posts for his fangirls on Twitter of him at a restuarant or in pre season trip. Even those don't express an emotion as much as imply that there might be one.
I think he is typical of most Spanish cyclists. They are for the most part reserved when it comes to their interaction with the media. The exception being on the podium where I've seen true emotion from him that goes through the entire spectrum. There are times off the bike where his sense of humour comes forth for instance his response to Froome's implications in his book about Contador's training rides with his "amigo's" being little more than cappuchino breaks. I believe he posted something on social media of him and I think Jesus toasting with cups of java and smiling. Most recently in response to the motorized bikes drama, he transported himself from the team bus on an electric bike.

Valverde and Contador behave very similar when it comes to interaction with the media. They never say what they really mean, quite boring in general and no real emotions. Purito on the other hand, always shows his emotions on the podium and in interviews, and is always in for some good quotes. I have heard from many people that Contador is the most popular cyclist in Spain, followed by Purito and then only Valverde. I don't know if it's true, but it would make sense.
 
Aug 4, 2011
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Arredondo said:
Angliru said:
The Hitch said:
On the other hand, his personality is pretty crap. As far as interviews go, the dialogue in sports video games are more varied than contadors responses to interviews. Same pre arranged answers from gt to gt to gt, from stage to stage to stage. You can summarizes 10 years worth of interviews in 3 or 4 sentences. Starting with an assessment of the etapa as "dura", (muy dura if it's an mtf) then something about sensations, and to conclude, an expression of hope/ contained happiness, depending on whether the stage has already taken place or not.

The closest he comes to expressing any emotion is the photos he posts for his fangirls on Twitter of him at a restuarant or in pre season trip. Even those don't express an emotion as much as imply that there might be one.
I think he is typical of most Spanish cyclists. They are for the most part reserved when it comes to their interaction with the media. The exception being on the podium where I've seen true emotion from him that goes through the entire spectrum. There are times off the bike where his sense of humour comes forth for instance his response to Froome's implications in his book about Contador's training rides with his "amigo's" being little more than cappuchino breaks. I believe he posted something on social media of him and I think Jesus toasting with cups of java and smiling. Most recently in response to the motorized bikes drama, he transported himself from the team bus on an electric bike.

Valverde and Contador behave very similar when it comes to interaction with the media. They never say what they really mean, quite boring in general and no real emotions. Purito on the other hand, always shows his emotions on the podium and in interviews, and is always in for some good quotes. I have heard from many people that Contador is the most popular cyclist in Spain, followed by Purito and then only Valverde. I don't know if it's true, but it would make sense.
That's because Purito keeps coming up short. His emotions are just frustration for the bitter taste of defeat.
 
Apr 12, 2009
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Help me out here,
I indeed do not seem to find any cyclist who even comes close to Contador's number of facebook likes (800k).
Cav is at 400k, there a bunch aroun 200k (Nibali, Froome,..)

Obv Armstrong has more likes, but that doesn't count.
 
Aug 4, 2011
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del1962 said:
Red Rick said:
Btw, was Pantani also that popular when he was still riding or did the hype just completely explode after he died?
popular when riding in mid ninenties b4 he won the TDF
I would say once Pantani became a Pirate then he became more popular. Johnny Depp was another popular pirate and so was Captain Pugwash, Gena davis was a lady pirate and there are other pirates such as black beard etc
 
Buffalo Soldier said:
Help me out here,
I indeed do not seem to find any cyclist who even comes close to Contador's number of facebook likes (800k).
Cav is at 400k, there a bunch aroun 200k (Nibali, Froome,..)

Obv Armstrong has more likes, but that doesn't count.
Yeah he has most facebook likes I think.
On twitter he is #1 in front of Cavendish with at the moment 931k followers vs Cav's 930k but this changes a lot, but they are always close to each other. Rigo is a distant third with 432k.
 
Aug 16, 2013
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ray j willings said:
Arredondo said:
Angliru said:
The Hitch said:
On the other hand, his personality is pretty crap. As far as interviews go, the dialogue in sports video games are more varied than contadors responses to interviews. Same pre arranged answers from gt to gt to gt, from stage to stage to stage. You can summarizes 10 years worth of interviews in 3 or 4 sentences. Starting with an assessment of the etapa as "dura", (muy dura if it's an mtf) then something about sensations, and to conclude, an expression of hope/ contained happiness, depending on whether the stage has already taken place or not.

The closest he comes to expressing any emotion is the photos he posts for his fangirls on Twitter of him at a restuarant or in pre season trip. Even those don't express an emotion as much as imply that there might be one.
I think he is typical of most Spanish cyclists. They are for the most part reserved when it comes to their interaction with the media. The exception being on the podium where I've seen true emotion from him that goes through the entire spectrum. There are times off the bike where his sense of humour comes forth for instance his response to Froome's implications in his book about Contador's training rides with his "amigo's" being little more than cappuchino breaks. I believe he posted something on social media of him and I think Jesus toasting with cups of java and smiling. Most recently in response to the motorized bikes drama, he transported himself from the team bus on an electric bike.

Valverde and Contador behave very similar when it comes to interaction with the media. They never say what they really mean, quite boring in general and no real emotions. Purito on the other hand, always shows his emotions on the podium and in interviews, and is always in for some good quotes. I have heard from many people that Contador is the most popular cyclist in Spain, followed by Purito and then only Valverde. I don't know if it's true, but it would make sense.
That's because Purito keeps coming up short. His emotions are just frustration for the bitter taste of defeat.
***. I'm talking about the good mood he always has during interviews, and the jokes he makes. He's very popular in the Spanish media, because he's a character. The fact he loses big races, also helps in his popularity, but isn't the main reason at all.

With all kinds of respect too Valverde, but he isn't. Perhaps because he got a lot of criticism of the media the last years, so he has build some kind of wall around him. Just as Contador. You don't have to listen to interviews of those two, because they are filled with the same cliches over and over again.
 
Aug 26, 2014
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I think he is very popular; pretty certain he's the most popular active rider. Maybe Cav. or Cancellara could compete. Cav. has almost identical twitter followers. Where does Kittel stand in the fangirl stakes?)

His attributes as a cyclist have been mentioned several times - that he races with passion, commitment, takes risks etc., and that 'dancing on the pedals' fluid style is endlessly pleasing to watch. The sense that you're never quite sure what he might get up to means that you want to watch whatever he does - he animates the race. And yes, as Carols say, he's a winner. There is a charisma to him as a rider which I feel sets him apart. But - and this is key for me, at least - he's a winner without being brash or arrogant. There's no false modesty, but all that drive and competitiveness does not translate into aggression, egomania or narcissism off the bike. Indeed, he seems to be a nice guy. I also personally find his sheer will / mental strength formidable.

Maybe people do find him boring or one-dimensional, but like LaFlo., I like what of his personality I can see. As for his responses, well, I find him quite subtle and clever. Look at how he dealt with the whole 'coffee amigos' thing - that is not only funny, it makes an extremely elegant point. Look at how he dealt with the Stage 16/17 debacle - wouldn't get drawn into outright criticism or trading insults or whining about the puncture / attack the jersey stuff, but did say 'Well, I don't think Aru is very happy at the moment', or words to that effect. It's clear he wasn't happy about it but he did not say anything outright. And for the most part, he makes any other points he needs to make - take Armstrong - on the road.

His backstory of being poor and overcoming adversity has got to help the narrative, and lets be honest, it helps he's quite easy on the eye without appearing to love himself quite like Cipo or be an out-and-out womanising ***. Add in the fact that he doesn't seem to have capitalised on his fame with biographies etc., or court the media in fame-whoring Hello exposes etc., (and neither does his wife) and there seems a lot to like and respect. I'm sure he's not the life and soul of the party, but that means he's not a marmite character. And those GCN videos show an engaging enough personality, if not one that is about to set the world alight.

It's a very different era, but I think he'll gain the myth and mystic of the Merxx and Hinault etc. But it's very difficult to assess legacy except in retrospect.

I must say, I have noticed a thaw in the media attitude to him in recent months. There's still the 'mention the doping at every opportunity' but it is more tempered with (sometimes grudging) respect. Was rather surprised to see an article in the paper comparing Sky's RV and Porte's deterioration with Contador's attitude and mental strength. That hasn't been the kind of tone before, IMO.
 
I see where you're coming from. I am not a massive fan of Contador, this isn't to say I don't like him, I'm just not a fanboy, but I think he is possibly the best GC rider ever to have lived, even better than Mercxx (although Mercxx is still the best ever cyclist). I like the way he races too, and he doesn't really have many haters, unlike almost every other racer. So yeah, he is the most well liked cyclist in the peloton right now.
 
Aug 4, 2011
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Arredondo quote " *** and The fact he loses big races, also helps in his popularity"

Exactly my point and no need to swear.
 
Aug 16, 2013
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ray j willings said:
Arredondo quote " *** and The fact he loses big races, also helps in his popularity"

Exactly my point and no need to swear.
It's only a small part of his popularity. So you don't read or deliberatly don't want to read to make your point. And *** is not swearing in the sense you mean. But be my guest :rolleyes:
 
Re: Re:

Arredondo said:
ray j willings said:
Arredondo quote " *** and The fact he loses big races, also helps in his popularity"

Exactly my point and no need to swear.
It's only a small part of his popularity. So you don't read or deliberatly don't want to read to make your point. And *** is not swearing in the sense you mean. But be my guest :rolleyes:
I'm pretty sure he is just trying to wind you up (wouldn't be out of character for him).

I've seen Purito interviewed dozens of times and he shows real character in them. Especially the Vuelta when he lost to Contador on Fuente de giving a full interview saying he was happy to be part of the spectacle. Contador and others if they don't like a result will go straight to the bus.
 
Since we are considering all cyclist and also taking into account the media explosion w.r.t the internet, IMO Merckx remains the most popular ever.
Popularity depends on a number of parameters including attacking style, panache, dealing with adversity. engaging personality etc.
But Contador would be 2nd. Binda, Coppi and Bartali would be too focused on Italy. Anquetil was never popular. Hinault was too grumpy. Indurain was a robot. No need to say anything about LA
 
Re: Re:

The Hitch said:
I'm pretty sure he is just trying to wind you up (wouldn't be out of character for him).

I've seen Purito interviewed dozens of times and he shows real character in them. Especially the Vuelta when he lost to Contador on Fuente de giving a full interview saying he was happy to be part of the spectacle. Contador and others if they don't like a result will go straight to the bus.
uhmmm :confused:
 
Jul 27, 2014
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Electress said:
I think he is very popular; pretty certain he's the most popular active rider. Maybe Cav. or Cancellara could compete. Cav. has almost identical twitter followers. Where does Kittel stand in the fangirl stakes?)

His attributes as a cyclist have been mentioned several times - that he races with passion, commitment, takes risks etc., and that 'dancing on the pedals' fluid style is endlessly pleasing to watch. The sense that you're never quite sure what he might get up to means that you want to watch whatever he does - he animates the race. And yes, as Carols say, he's a winner. There is a charisma to him as a rider which I feel sets him apart. But - and this is key for me, at least - he's a winner without being brash or arrogant. There's no false modesty, but all that drive and competitiveness does not translate into aggression, egomania or narcissism off the bike. Indeed, he seems to be a nice guy. I also personally find his sheer will / mental strength formidable.

Maybe people do find him boring or one-dimensional, but like LaFlo., I like what of his personality I can see. As for his responses, well, I find him quite subtle and clever. Look at how he dealt with the whole 'coffee amigos' thing - that is not only funny, it makes an extremely elegant point. Look at how he dealt with the Stage 16/17 debacle - wouldn't get drawn into outright criticism or trading insults or whining about the puncture / attack the jersey stuff, but did say 'Well, I don't think Aru is very happy at the moment', or words to that effect. It's clear he wasn't happy about it but he did not say anything outright. And for the most part, he makes any other points he needs to make - take Armstrong - on the road.

His backstory of being poor and overcoming adversity has got to help the narrative, and lets be honest, it helps he's quite easy on the eye without appearing to love himself quite like Cipo or be an out-and-out womanising ****. Add in the fact that he doesn't seem to have capitalised on his fame with biographies etc., or court the media in fame-whoring Hello exposes etc., (and neither does his wife) and there seems a lot to like and respect. I'm sure he's not the life and soul of the party, but that means he's not a marmite character. And those GCN videos show an engaging enough personality, if not one that is about to set the world alight.

It's a very different era, but I think he'll gain the myth and mystic of the Merxx and Hinault etc. But it's very difficult to assess legacy except in retrospect.

I must say, I have noticed a thaw in the media attitude to him in recent months. There's still the 'mention the doping at every opportunity' but it is more tempered with (sometimes grudging) respect. Was rather surprised to see an article in the paper comparing Sky's RV and Porte's deterioration with Contador's attitude and mental strength. That hasn't been the kind of tone before, IMO.
Kittel hasn't won enough to be up their with the three respective bests of their generation. Cavendish isn't really liked either. Could he possibly be the most unpopular current cyclist. Excluding the UK?
 
Re: Re:

Arredondo said:
ray j willings said:
Arredondo said:
Angliru said:
The Hitch said:
On the other hand, his personality is pretty crap. As far as interviews go, the dialogue in sports video games are more varied than contadors responses to interviews. Same pre arranged answers from gt to gt to gt, from stage to stage to stage. You can summarizes 10 years worth of interviews in 3 or 4 sentences. Starting with an assessment of the etapa as "dura", (muy dura if it's an mtf) then something about sensations, and to conclude, an expression of hope/ contained happiness, depending on whether the stage has already taken place or not.

The closest he comes to expressing any emotion is the photos he posts for his fangirls on Twitter of him at a restuarant or in pre season trip. Even those don't express an emotion as much as imply that there might be one.
I think he is typical of most Spanish cyclists. They are for the most part reserved when it comes to their interaction with the media. The exception being on the podium where I've seen true emotion from him that goes through the entire spectrum. There are times off the bike where his sense of humour comes forth for instance his response to Froome's implications in his book about Contador's training rides with his "amigo's" being little more than cappuchino breaks. I believe he posted something on social media of him and I think Jesus toasting with cups of java and smiling. Most recently in response to the motorized bikes drama, he transported himself from the team bus on an electric bike.

Valverde and Contador behave very similar when it comes to interaction with the media. They never say what they really mean, quite boring in general and no real emotions. Purito on the other hand, always shows his emotions on the podium and in interviews, and is always in for some good quotes. I have heard from many people that Contador is the most popular cyclist in Spain, followed by Purito and then only Valverde. I don't know if it's true, but it would make sense.
That's because Purito keeps coming up short. His emotions are just frustration for the bitter taste of defeat.
***. I'm talking about the good mood he always has during interviews, and the jokes he makes. He's very popular in the Spanish media, because he's a character. The fact he loses big races, also helps in his popularity, but isn't the main reason at all.

With all kinds of respect too Valverde, but he isn't. Perhaps because he got a lot of criticism of the media the last years, so he has build some kind of wall around him. Just as Contador. You don't have to listen to interviews of those two, because they are filled with the same cliches over and over again.
Purito is blessed with a fine sense of humour. I can't help but think of the photo shop where he morphed Sagan's infamous podium posterior pinch with Boonen's crash at Paris-Roubaix and created a hilarious image that I'll have to search for and post. I'm sure someone will beat me to it.

As far as the OP's question, I'd have to say that he is likely the most popular current cyclist and by nature of his career spanning the information age, his exploits have reached a much larger audience than his predacessors, making him potentially one of the most well known but not necessarily the most popular. It would be rather difficult to guage popularity without some type of international poll being done and even then it's possible an entire generation's opinion may be missed because the liklihood they aren't "connected" and/or don't really care to be accessible via the internet, which would be the easiest way to do such a poll.
 
Aug 16, 2013
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The Hitch said:
Arredondo said:
ray j willings said:
Arredondo quote " *** and The fact he loses big races, also helps in his popularity"

Exactly my point and no need to swear.
It's only a small part of his popularity. So you don't read or deliberatly don't want to read to make your point. And *** is not swearing in the sense you mean. But be my guest :rolleyes:
I'm pretty sure he is just trying to wind you up (wouldn't be out of character for him).

I've seen Purito interviewed dozens of times and he shows real character in them. Especially the Vuelta when he lost to Contador on Fuente de giving a full interview saying he was happy to be part of the spectacle. Contador and others if they don't like a result will go straight to the bus.
This. That interview after Fuente De stage was great and memorable. Honest and with respect to the great perfomance of Alberto.
 
Aug 26, 2014
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Kittel hasn't won enough to be up their with the three respective bests of their generation. Cavendish isn't really liked either. Could he possibly be the most unpopular current cyclist. Excluding the UK?
I had just heard Kittel was a fangirl favourite; doesn't do much for me but takes all types.

I think Cav. is liked but he's more of a marmite character because more outspoken and emotional, indeed petulant. But 930,000 twitterrs aren't following a guy they dislike. I also think he's more widely popular than his English contemporaries - i.e. his fans aren't all UK based.

Whoever mentioned about the non-corporate image of AC has an interesting point. I think it is a matter of how they are presented versus reality, though. It's the difference between emphasising the 'ride on feel' vs. 'ride by the numbers'. I'm pretty sure they all have a very good idea about their numbers, but they don't all labour the point.
 
Aug 16, 2013
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LaFlorecita said:
The Hitch said:
I'm pretty sure he is just trying to wind you up (wouldn't be out of character for him).

I've seen Purito interviewed dozens of times and he shows real character in them. Especially the Vuelta when he lost to Contador on Fuente de giving a full interview saying he was happy to be part of the spectacle. Contador and others if they don't like a result will go straight to the bus.
uhmmm :confused:
He's talking about the Ancares stage 2012 where he lost the stage in the dying seconds to Purito.
 

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