Less well known cycling records or facts

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Aug 13, 2010
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janraaskalt said:
Didn't win Landis the stage where he was disqualified later?
Both were stripped of their titles but I was crediting Contador and not Landis as the overall winner (since I listed Oscar Pereiro (2006) ).
 
Aug 13, 2010
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UpTheRoad said:
Who is the other? Bugno in 1990?
Actually looking into this more it seems that 4 people including Bugno have done this.

Girardengo (1919)
Binda (1927)
Merckx (1973)
Bugno (1990)

Binda was the second person to achieve this.

Source.
 
Don't be late Pedro said:
Both were stripped of their titles but I was crediting Contador and not Landis as the overall winner (since I listed Oscar Pereiro (2006) ).
Contador of course now as a result also does not get the distinction of being only the second rider in history to win 2 of each (Hinault).

And also the slightly less important distinction of winning a stage in each.

In fact looking at that, there are 82 riders who have won a stage in all 3 grand tours, the most recent being Purito when he took Asissi this year. http://www.irishpeloton.com/2012/06/the-grand-tour-hat-trick-a-stage-win-in-each/

I do wonder how narrow that list becomes if we count 2 in each (a group which Contador was part of until february 5th of this year)

And how many sit alongside Cav as having won 3 of each. Edit: looking at wikipedia the answer is 19 (might be 20 since wiki only lists riders who won 10 stages and someone who won 9 could have won 3 3 3)
 
The only rider to ever win the Tour de l'Avenir twice is Soviet climber Sergey Sukhoruchenkov, arguably the best climber in the history of the Eastern Bloc. He was 23 at the time of his second triumph, but did not attempt a Grand Tour for another 7 years, when the Soviet Union included him in its selection for the Vuelta a España. The Vuelta overlapped with the Course de la Paix that year so was seen by Soviet selectors as a consolation prize for those riders that didn't make the Peace Race startlist.
 
Jul 24, 2012
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only two rider won 4 consecutive stage at the Tour de France

1930 Charless Pellissier (the last 4!!, Metz, Charville, Malo-les Bains, Paris)
1999 Mario Cipollini (Blois, Amiens, Maubeuge, Thoinville)



 
Aug 13, 2010
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When Chris Boardman broke the hour record for the first time, Luc Leblanc remarked that if Boardman could break it, half of the pro peloton could.

In his first TdF, Boardman caught his minute-man, Leblanc, over a 7.1 km course and set the fastest ever Tour stage in the process. Source and Video


After the 1994 prologue Boardman was reminded of that quote and purportedly said
I suppose that shows which half of the peloton Luc LeBlanc is in...
 
Aug 13, 2010
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Michael Rasmussen is known for his care for detail when considering weight.

He is known for peeling off unnecessary stickers from his bike due to the additional grams.

He used to count each grain of rice before eating and had water with his breakfast cereal, not milk.

Source.
 
Don't be late Pedro said:
Michael Rasmussen is known for his care for detail when considering weight.

He is known for peeling off unnecessary stickers from his bike due to the additional grams.

He used to count each grain of rice before eating and had water with his breakfast cereal, not milk.

Source.
Lol, what a waste of time. :eek:

No wonder he was slim. He wouldn't have had much time to eat after counting all the grains of rice.:D
 
Aug 13, 2010
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The phrase “King of the Mountains” comes from 1905 when René Pottier climbed the Grand Ballon in the Alsace region. Riding for a team with Peugeot bikes, the company’s factory was down the road and workers lined the climb. The spectacle was so great that newspaper L’Auto proclaimed Pottier as “le roi de la montagne“, or the king of the mountain. Source.
 
Aug 13, 2010
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Red Rick said:
Landis won a stage
As mentioned in a previous post, (I think) Netserk was wondering why I indirectly credited Contador (2010) with a Tour win and not Landis (2005) when both were stripped.
 
Jan Raas won the 1978 Tour prologue, but because of a dramatic shift in the weather, he was not given the Maillot Jaune, even though his name went into the record books as the Prologue winner. Source.

Don't be late Pedro said:
Actually looking into this more it seems that 4 people including Bugno have done this.
Girardengo (1919) Binda (1927) Merckx (1973) Bugno (1990)
Any Tour or Vuelta stats on this? (Too lazy to look it up).

Great thread BTW.
 
The annual Cima Coppi prize for the rider who wins the highest mountain summit in the Giro was established in 1965. The highest summit has been the Passo dello Stelvio (2758m), which has been used 6 times since then. On three occasions the Cima Coppi has been outside of Italy, in a different country each time. In 1971 the prize was given away for crossing the Großglockner, in Austria; in 1982 the Cima Coppi went to France, given on the Col d'Izoard, although the riders did not crest the full summit of the climb, finishing at 2361m; and in 1985 the highest point was the Simplonpass, in Switzerland. At 2005m, this remains the lowest ever Cima Coppi in the Giro's history. The next lowest is Sestrières, at 2035m, in 2009. Had the original Blockhaus stage not been shortened, this would have been the Cima Coppi, but would still have been the 2nd lowest of all time.
 

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