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Miller clearly still on drugs...

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Swabian Lass said:
Seriously I thought that the interviewer gave Millar a very easy time. Must be a fanboy. Most interesting bit was when he referred to LA as the "great shadow hanging over the sport". Don't think you'd have heard that on a mainstream European news channel even as recently as a year ago.
But they did say that Armstrong was the best cyclist ever which made me puke.

Its not that I like Armstrong less, its that i love cycling more.
Jullius Ceasar Act 3 Scene 2.
 
Jul 26, 2009
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The Hitch said:
But they did say that Armstrong was the best cyclist ever which made me puke.

Its not that I like Armstrong less, its that i love cycling more.
Jullius Ceasar Act 3 Scene 2.
Armstrong is the doper who profited most from doping and showed other dopers how to dope their way to an empire. He must be like a God to guys like Millar.
 
Aug 6, 2009
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I posted this response in the wrong thread for some reason...here it is with some add-ons.

Millar should receive a lifetime ban from the sport not for the doping, but for this hideous outfit.

It is a monstrosity that deserves swift, harsh justice.

As for the interview, how much contrition is Millar supposed to exhibit before he can go on with his life?

Was doping such a catastrophically existential dilemma that he must now call on the ghosts of Sartre and Camus to sort it out?

He seems to be overdoing it, and has been from the very beginning. The reality is he's made a career out of feeling guilty moreso than with his legs, so he's going to keep at it until he retires.
 
Apr 29, 2009
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Once again, Millar manages to blame almost everybody around him but himself. How nice it must be to roll through life without actually taking any real responsibility for your actions.

For someone so articulate, and who appears on so many interviews claiming to have done years of self reflection to reach his new found state of sporting nirvana, he sure does seem to have his own story wrong. To say that his doping was something that 'happened to him' is quite the fallacy when by his own account his doping began in his 20's, after some time as a professional. Just like his overwrought answers to simple interview questions, it was calculated.

No idea what Millar is up to nowadays, but his faux repentance frustrates me. Go open a bike shop if you like cycling that much are only back for the love of the sport.
 
Apr 29, 2009
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Berzin said:
Was doping such a catastrophically existential dilemma that he must now call on the ghosts of Sartre and Camus to sort it out?
Haha, I'll drink to to that!
 
May 6, 2009
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Has anybody read Millar's book, or will read it? I'll probably end up with it for Christmas, but I don't think I'll buy it.
 
Jun 20, 2009
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craig1985 said:
Has anybody read Millar's book, or will read it? I'll probably end up with it for Christmas, but I don't think I'll buy it.
Yup. Quite a good read and doesn't shy away from the fact that Millar was a complete w*nker for large parts of his life. Heaps the dirt on Cofidis and Saunier. The book is most interesting (at least to me) from a psychological perspective as a tale of a young man learning life's lessons. In that sense, cycling and doping are merely vehicles for the book's primary theme.

I see that a lot of people who haven't read the book (bizarrely, and apparently without any sense of irony) say he is lying in the book and is still a doper. I don't know whether or not he is, but on the basis of his book, form and results in recent years and other public statements I tend to think it more likely than not he is riding clean.
 
Jan 13, 2010
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laziali said:
Yup. Quite a good read and doesn't shy away from the fact that Millar was a complete w*nker for large parts of his life. Heaps the dirt on Cofidis and Saunier. The book is most interesting (at least to me) from a psychological perspective as a tale of a young man learning life's lessons. In that sense, cycling and doping are merely vehicles for the book's primary theme.
Not that Cofidis and Saunier Duval shouldn't get heaped on. I'd believed for some time that Saunier Duval was cavalier about doping, and the sacking of Ricco and Piepoli had to be done only because the problem was out in the open. In other words, this was one of the worst possible situations for a young impressionable ****er like Millar.

Whether he's writing and speaking to capitalize on his misspent youth before he becomes yesterday's news, or he sincerely believes he has something important to say, I think it's safe to say he is not trying to set himself up as a heroic crusader.
 
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