Most "breakable" cyclist

A

Anonymous

Guest
That was one wicked bad crash. They keep saying that someone went too fast, but from the overhead it looks like the guy that caused it got too close to the inside curb. I know that it was a shallow concrete gutter curb and not a stepped one, but the guy that went down is the one who was closest to the inside. Then again, speed could have been the other main factor. It didn't look to me that he was going any faster than anyone else, he was just cutting it more closely. Just an off the cuff observation though.
 
Mar 18, 2009
1,921
0
0
Thoughtforfood said:
That was one wicked bad crash. They keep saying that someone went too fast, but from the overhead it looks like the guy that caused it got too close to the inside curb. I know that it was a shallow concrete gutter curb and not a stepped one, but the guy that went down is the one who was closest to the inside. Then again, speed could have been the other main factor. It didn't look to me that he was going any faster than anyone else, he was just cutting it more closely. Just an off the cuff observation though.
I didn't see it, but anyone on the inside of a turn is traveling faster relative to the others, even though he's going the same speed relative to the ground.
 
Thoughtforfood said:
That was one wicked bad crash. They keep saying that someone went too fast, but from the overhead it looks like the guy that caused it got too close to the inside curb. I know that it was a shallow concrete gutter curb and not a stepped one, but the guy that went down is the one who was closest to the inside. Then again, speed could have been the other main factor. It didn't look to me that he was going any faster than anyone else, he was just cutting it more closely. Just an off the cuff observation though.
I read Rein Taaramae´s short interview. He said that he felt comfortable throughout the stage because he had rain tyres, while many around him didnt and struggled all the time.

(Taarame himself crashed once because somebody came onto his bike at the moment when he was reaching to the water bottle.)
 
Mar 18, 2009
1,921
0
0
Hugh Januss said:
Ninety5rpm said:
I didn't see it, but anyone on the inside of a turn is traveling faster relative to the others, even though he's going the same speed relative to the ground.
Umm, wouldn't that be the other way around?
No, that's why you try to pass on the inside. When you're on the inside of the curve, you're moving faster than those on the outside even when you're moving at the same speed (relative to the ground) as they are.

That is, if two guys are neck and neck at 30 mph on a straight-a-way, if they go around a left-hand turn, the one on the inside, the one on the left, will move ahead of the one on the right, even though their speeds relative to the ground remain steady at 30 mph.

This is because the one on the inside is traveling a shorter distance. The radius of the curve he is following is shorter than the one on the outside.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
banprocycling said:
i doubt the tour of spain will be going back to belgium any time soon. One crash after another today.
..Brilliant observation!!!!!

I'll bet they cancel Liege Bastogne Liege too!
 
Mar 13, 2009
13
0
0
You can't break Horner mentally. He just seems to have $h!t for luck...:(

As to the speed question. The person on the outside is going faster relative to the ground and here's why: It's similar to what is called "Surface Feet per Minute" (SFM) in the machining world. For example; if you were turning a diameter on a round bar in a lathe, your RPM would be slower when the bar is at it's largest size. The more material you remove, the RPM's will increase to maintain the same SFM.

So if you think of the riders speed as a constant, the rider on the outside is travelling faster than the inside rider relative to the surface. The only advantage the inside rider has at the same speed (MPH) is a shorter distance to travel.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
BanProCycling said:
Thank you. The Tour of Spain doesn't have so much of the cold muddy weather. Some of the riders even choose it because they don't like that stuff. That doesn't mean we have to cancel all races in Belgium, silly billy.
Ah, a new meteorological term I'm not familiar with. How about they just neutralize races when there's cold muddy weather? Problem solved.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Scott SoCal said:
Ah, a new meteorological term I'm not familiar with. How about they just neutralize races when there's cold muddy weather? Problem solved.
Or its raining and there are train tracks. I think they should cancel Paris-Roubaix when it rains too...THANKS BPS!!!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
BanProCycling said:
Pssst, it is the Tour of Spain, not the Paris Roubiax.

So you think the organisers will go back to Belgium again soon, eh? Okay...:D
And I am sure it is because of the rain...BRILLIANT!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Hey, what will they do if it rains in Spain. I hear it is all the rage on the plains!
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
BanProCycling said:
It's because of the type of surface the rain creates at this time of the year in that country, silly. Not the rain itself. It was even worse than usual for other events held in Belgium so something was definitely up. Shaun Kelly was very surprised.
Yea, that HORRIBLE Belgium asphalt is legendarily bad. Much worse in the wet than ANY asphalt in the free world and even the Republic of Georgia which is just Georgia now, but not the state, the country and now it is somewhat "free" but it is in a war and the roads are pretty bad, but not like Belgium.
 
Ninety5rpm said:
No, that's why you try to pass on the inside. When you're on the inside of the curve, you're moving faster than those on the outside even when you're moving at the same speed (relative to the ground) as they are.

That is, if two guys are neck and neck at 30 mph on a straight-a-way, if they go around a left-hand turn, the one on the inside, the one on the left, will move ahead of the one on the right, even though their speeds relative to the ground remain steady at 30 mph.

This is because the one on the inside is traveling a shorter distance. The radius of the curve he is following is shorter than the one on the outside.
Right, I was talking in terms of two guys riding around a corner side by side, like in a group.
 
Mar 19, 2009
832
0
0
Oscar Freire has proven over many years he's the most breakable cyclist in the current peloton.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
BanProCycling said:
Well the cobblestones are pretty legendary in Belgium. Not a great way to start a grand tour. There's probably been some rumblings in the peloton about yesterday's events. I don't know what type of apshalt they're using on the roads for some of that route but something was amiss.

I don't think you understand that the Tour of Spain doesn't have to go to Belgium. They're doing Belgium a favour by being there. Any sense that it didn't go well will likely mean they won't be back in a hurry.
I don't think you understand that when people race, they fall off their bikes sometimes, and that the course was decided by the people who run the race. Belgium doesn't have anything to do with anything. It is just a place where they raced the past few days, and those crashes could have happened in any GT. In fact, I think you will find that crashes in GT's are not limited to the Vuelta stages in Belgium. But it doesn't change your always BRILLIANT!!! observations.

I mean, you do realize that GT's many times start in other countries, and that they sometimes have years before they go back to a specific country, right? I mean, I am pretty sure that the Tour isn't staying away from GB for the last couple of years because many people have bad teeth. I mean, they hadn't been there since '74. Hey, what is your BRILLIANT observation about that bit of time?
 
BanProCycling said:
Well the cobblestones are pretty legendary in Belgium. Not a great way to start a grand tour. There's probably been some rumblings in the peloton about yesterday's events. I don't know what type of apshalt they're using on the roads for some of that route but something was amiss.

I don't think you understand that the Tour of Spain doesn't have to go to Belgium. They're doing Belgium a favour by being there. Any sense that it didn't go well will likely mean they won't be back in a hurry.
Quite a few race ending crashes in the TDF have taken place in France and yet they still go there for tour stages.
I have heard they race most of that Paris-Roubaix race in the part of Belgium commonly refered to as "France" anyway.
 
Jun 2, 2009
56
0
0
rocketshoes said:
So if you think of the riders speed as a constant, the rider on the outside is travelling faster
If two riders are moving across space at the same velocity, the one with the shorter radius in a turn (inside rider) will gain position (move ahead) over the other. Same speed is same speed. If both are moving at the same speed then it is impossible for the outside rider to be moving faster. If no position is gained or lost, then the outside rider would necessarily have had to go through the turn at a faster velocity than the inside rider. The lathe analogy doesn’t work here because velocity increases as radius increases. For the bicyclists going through a turn velocity is held constant as radius increases. Why do you think start positions are staggered in track and field?
 

flicker

BANNED
Aug 17, 2009
4,153
0
0
crash

Unfortunate crash. Horner is incredibly unlucky. Similar to Hincapie in Paris Roubaix. It was an unavoidable crash.

I don't know why people are constantly breaking bones.

On club rides 2 riders go down both break bones. This is in a little sprint.

Everyone needs how to tumble dance ice skate loosen up to avoid the strains and breaks. How sad but it is a part of racing, comes with the territory.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY