Most "breakable" cyclist

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Anonymous

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BanProCycling said:
Um, do you have a point by the way? I get the feeling you were trolling and just had to say something to counter me even it it wasn't the right issue. I could be wrong....
You don't have a legitimate* one, so why should I?

Oh, yea, you live in England <wink> <wink>







*The words "coherent" "logical" "intelligent" "insightful" "interesting" can also be used here
 
Jun 16, 2009
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On topic: Jaun Mauricio Soler for "most breakable", amazing combination of fragility, bad luck and an absence of exceptional bike handling skills.

Off topic: huge crowds, plenty of action, riders racing like they give a damn, I'd be amazed if the Vuelta stays away from Benelux for long.
 
Jun 9, 2009
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I don't know about the most breakable rider in the current peleton. I do know that a former training partner of mine (a domestic US pro) had a series of injuries that were pretty grim at the time, and pretty hilarious now.

On a training ride, he grabbed the roof rack of a support car we planned to motorpace behind. When the light turned green the car accelerated, but my training partner was daydreaming. He suffered a dislocated shoulder and was twisted on the saddle in such a manner that his vas deferens became tied in a knot. By the evening, his testicles had swollen to about three times their normal size.

We had gone to the emergency room for an x-ray of the shoulder earlier in the day. We had to go back to see the pee-pee doctor. A minimally invasive surgery was scheduled for the next day, much to his relief.

Four days later he was commuting to class on a track bike and got hit by a school catering van, suffering minor rash and bruising. This crash made the front page of the campus newspaper, complete with a huge photo.

Two days later, he decided to cross the yellow line in a county-line sprint and was hit from behind by another car. I will never forget seeing him skid along the road in front of the car (which had slammed its brakes on by this time) with is hand on the front bumper. This crash led to some major rash on the side opposite the rash from the crash on campus.

So there you have it. In one week he rashed both sides of his body, dislocated a shoulder, and tied his balls in a knot.

He went on to have a great career, representing the US at the world pro championships about a half dozen times.

I found a new training partner.
 
Jun 16, 2009
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David Suro said:
....He ... was twisted on the saddle in such a manner that his vas deferens became tied in a knot. By the evening, his testicles had swollen to about three times their normal size.
....
I never thought that was possible, now I know there is much worse that can happen than snapping the odd bone or two.
 
BanProCycling said:
The Paris roubaix is one of my favourite races. A real hard man's course. Wouldn't be a great way to start a grand tour though.
And yet the TDF has included a stage in northern France in many past editions. It has always been well received by the fans. You should try reading more and talking less, you would really seem more intelligent.
It is clear by now that that is not a focus for you however.
 
Staying on topic, on a psychological and physical level, I'll agree with Danielson.

Physically Horner seems to have the bad luck, but his spirits are up.

Anyone remember Wilfred Neilson? Many that guy crashed a lot. Once crashed on his own on a solo breakaway when he hit a curb and did a nasty tib-fib break where you could see the bone.

How about Abdujaparov? That guy seemed to have 2-3 major crashes a year, often taking others out with him.
 
Thoughtforfood said:
I don't think you understand that when people race, they fall off their bikes sometimes, and that the course was decided by the people who run the race. Belgium doesn't have anything to do with anything. It is just a place where they raced the past few days, and those crashes could have happened in any GT. In fact, I think you will find that crashes in GT's are not limited to the Vuelta stages in Belgium. But it doesn't change your always BRILLIANT!!! observations.

I mean, you do realize that GT's many times start in other countries, and that they sometimes have years before they go back to a specific country, right? I mean, I am pretty sure that the Tour isn't staying away from GB for the last couple of years because many people have bad teeth. I mean, they hadn't been there since '74. Hey, what is your BRILLIANT observation about that bit of time?
From what I read the crash was caused by an oil slick, made lethal by the rain.

Sure, as Boonen and Basso commented, it comes with the territory and is part of the job. A similar crash took place in the Giro last year, when the group was riding on wet roads in the south, where, it should be noted, the asphalt there really is of poor quality. The oil slick they came across, was made more problematical by the poor road quality and like 50 riders went down for what seemed no apparant reason.

In any case Belgium has bad weather more often than Spain this time of year, so whether or not the race organizers will think twice about returning the Vuelta to Belgium in the near future, I bet the riders were wishing yesterday when they hit the tarmac that they had been in sunny Spain instead. ;)

As for the most fragile rider, to get back to topic, I think Marco Pantani in the final analysis was very, very breakable, as his tragic end has demonstrated.
 
Jun 16, 2009
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Scott SoCal said:
Ah, a new meteorological term I'm not familiar with. How about they just neutralize races when there's cold muddy weather? Problem solved.
LBL is a one day event. At la vuelta we want most riders to finsh unscathed not injured or damaged from it (even though that sometime cannot be controlled). Having cars and trucks on the road is inexcusable at a GT event. The organisers should have some duty of care. they'll still have GT's pass through belgium but the organisers need to take more care for the riders
 
Apr 8, 2009
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Hugh Januss said:
That little dot between them means they are still in different sentences ,ace.
Moderators - could we move this to the grammatical section along with all the others?

.... and the comma should immediately follow the last letter and the space then goes after the comma. Just thought I would mention it. :D
 
Jun 26, 2009
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rocketshoes said:
You can't break Horner mentally. He just seems to have $h!t for luck...:(

As to the speed question. The person on the outside is going faster relative to the ground and here's why: It's similar to what is called "Surface Feet per Minute" (SFM) in the machining world. For example; if you were turning a diameter on a round bar in a lathe, your RPM would be slower when the bar is at it's largest size. The more material you remove, the RPM's will increase to maintain the same SFM.

So if you think of the riders speed as a constant, the rider on the outside is travelling faster than the inside rider relative to the surface. The only advantage the inside rider has at the same speed (MPH) is a shorter distance to travel.
The rocket scientists are trying to make a very simple concept into something complicated. The fact is that the quickest way through any corner is the inside line because you are covering less ground. Assuming both riders entered at the same speed. :rolleyes:
 
Jul 17, 2009
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David Cañada was also very fragile, he seemed to break his collarbone every single time he went down.
 
beroepsrenner said:
The rocket scientists are trying to make a very simple concept into something complicated. The fact is that the quickest way through any corner is the inside line because you are covering less ground. Assuming both riders entered at the same speed. :rolleyes:
Oh, maybe that's why my 10th grade geometry teacher wanted us to pay attention when he explained C = 2*pi*r and what we would later in life be able to deduce from that equation. Thanks Mr. Jones, you saved me from having to be a rocket scientist(belated apology for rubbing that old school unscented hot embrocation creme with the funny name into your eraser. We didn't think it would hurt that bad when you performed your daily routine of taking off the coke bottle glasses and rubbing your eyes.)
 
Aug 26, 2009
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Not quite on topic, but with all the crashes, and listening to the American commentators the dangerousness of the course, why didn't the riders neutralize the stage like they did this year in the Giro.

As for most fragile, I would agree with Horner. Whoever mentioned Abdu, I don't know that he was fragile, but he was definitely reckless and dangerous to those around him.
 
May 19, 2009
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IMO, Chris Horner seems to suffer from ADD. If I was him, I'd have that checked out like his new found asthma.
 
Jun 16, 2009
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Mark Andrews said:
Not quite on topic, but with all the crashes, and listening to the American commentators the dangerousness of the course, why didn't the riders neutralize the stage like they did this year in the Giro.
Because "The Boss" wasn't there to wimp out and make everyone do this.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
mambo#5 said:
IMO, Chris Horner seems to suffer from ADD. If I was him, I'd have that checked out like his new found asthma.
In your opinion, Lance is a great champion who is a hero deserving of adulation. You will have to excuse us if we don't consider your other opinions well thought out or relevant.
 
May 19, 2009
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Thoughtforfood said:
In your opinion, Lance is a great champion who is a hero deserving of adulation. You will have to excuse us if we don't consider your other opinions well thought out or relevant.
I don't mind it. I state my opinion and/or thoughts and that is the end of it. I am not seeking induction into TFF's LA hating fraternity.
 

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