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@on3m@n@rmy
Yep, Kaep can be good in the right situation, or at least serviceable.


@movingtarget
This is Orlovskys career:
Detroit Lions (2005–2008)
Houston Texans (2009–2010)
Indianapolis Colts (2011)
Tampa Bay Buccaneers (2012–2013)
Detroit Lions (2014–2016)
Los Angeles Rams (2017–present)

I know he had two different coordinators with the Lions in his second stint. But well there is a whole lot of experience there.

@Alpe d'Huez
Yep, he was around Veteran Minimum with the lions. And he does not bring any added media pressure.
 
Re:

ToreBear said:
@on3m@n@rmy
Yep, Kaep can be good in the right situation, or at least serviceable.


@movingtarget
This is Orlovskys career:
Detroit Lions (2005–2008)
Houston Texans (2009–2010)
Indianapolis Colts (2011)
Tampa Bay Buccaneers (2012–2013)
Detroit Lions (2014–2016)
Los Angeles Rams (2017–present)

I know he had two different coordinators with the Lions in his second stint. But well there is a whole lot of experience there.

@Alpe d'Huez
Yep, he was around Veteran Minimum with the lions. And he does not bring any added media pressure.
Yeah I guess Orlovsky has a breadth of experience. Not saying he doesn't deserve a job just curious as to why Kaep is not getting a shot. Narrowly missed being a Super Bowl winner, one pass away from another Super Bowl appearance, admittedly playing for a good team back then. Orlovsky went 0-16 with the Lions but I'm sure that others played a part in that as well. Kaep went 2-14 last year in a mediocre team.
 
Re: Re:

on3m@n@rmy said:
Part of the reason he looked to run too much is he was not good going through all of his progressions to the WRs. If Kap's 1st or 2nd read were covered he'd take off or want to take off. Then if he took off it was full commitment to run, almost never looking to pass.
This has been the knock on him going all the way back to college.
 
RG3 apparently working out for the Chargers.

Interesting article on Kaepernick, and why he's really persona non grata in the NFL.
Kaepernick has never done anything heinous or even criminal. His great sin wasn’t even disrespecting the anthem, the flag, the military or any of the other excuses that have been used over the last year to negate his message.

Rather, it was his audacity in calling out police brutality in communities of color and the economic system that’s at the root of it that is deemed unforgivable.

Other athletes have walked a finer line, condemning systemic racism while also calling for “personal responsibility” when it comes to black-on-black crime. Not Kaepernick. The former San Francisco 49ers quarterback pointed the finger squarely at everyone who has benefited from the system and done little more than watch as people of color are kept on the outside looking in.

“He attacked capitalism and the system that was created with systemic racism,” said Louis Moore, a history professor at Grand Valley State in Michigan and author of We Will Win the Day: The Civil Rights Movement, the Black Athlete and the Quest for Equality.

“His belief is, you solve this problem, the violence is going to take care of itself,” Moore said. “I think that’s what made people uncomfortable. It’s never acknowledged why racism and capitalism are intertwined.”
This is pretty interesting, and the article goes into why Michael Vick's comments on Kaepernick getting a haircut and looking the part are part of the problem, not solution. Considering that Kaeprnick didn't respond to Vick, but tweeted a definition of Stockholm Syndrome adds another layer.

But if you look at it from a broad view, Kaepernick has benefited greatly from this very system financially. And he was given a great opportunity to start for an outstanding team when they already had a QB who was winning (Alex Smith). So it's not like his struggles to get where he did were akin to that of Doug Williams. Let alone a modern day Coalhouse Walker Jr, loaded with talent and determination, never able to capitalize on it because of racism. Kaepernick has had many opportunities, and unless he just blew through the millions he made in recent years ($12m alone last season), is by any reasonable measure wealthy, part of the 1%.

I think what may be most interesting to me is that now I really do want to hear what Kaepernick has to say. I want to hear his thoughts on racial inequality, and how market politics plays into that, as Moore noted. If anyone has seen the film Free State of Jones, I would have to think that must have really resonated with Kaepernick. But if Kap is ever to play in the NFL again, I imagine the last thing he's going to do is talk more about this complicated issue, and in some ways, that's unforunate.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/columnist/nancy-armour/2017/07/19/colin-kaepernick-michael-vick-hair-activism-image/489734001/#
 
Re:

Alpe d'Huez said:
RG3 apparently working out for the Chargers.

Interesting article on Kaepernick, and why he's really persona non grata in the NFL.
Kaepernick has never done anything heinous or even criminal. His great sin wasn’t even disrespecting the anthem, the flag, the military or any of the other excuses that have been used over the last year to negate his message.

Rather, it was his audacity in calling out police brutality in communities of color and the economic system that’s at the root of it that is deemed unforgivable.

Other athletes have walked a finer line, condemning systemic racism while also calling for “personal responsibility” when it comes to black-on-black crime. Not Kaepernick. The former San Francisco 49ers quarterback pointed the finger squarely at everyone who has benefited from the system and done little more than watch as people of color are kept on the outside looking in.

“He attacked capitalism and the system that was created with systemic racism,” said Louis Moore, a history professor at Grand Valley State in Michigan and author of We Will Win the Day: The Civil Rights Movement, the Black Athlete and the Quest for Equality.

“His belief is, you solve this problem, the violence is going to take care of itself,” Moore said. “I think that’s what made people uncomfortable. It’s never acknowledged why racism and capitalism are intertwined.”
This is pretty interesting, and the article goes into why Michael Vick's comments on Kaepernick getting a haircut and looking the part are part of the problem, not solution. Considering that Kaeprnick didn't respond to Vick, but tweeted a definition of Stockholm Syndrome adds another layer.

But if you look at it from a broad view, Kaepernick has benefited greatly from this very system financially. And he was given a great opportunity to start for an outstanding team when they already had a QB who was winning (Alex Smith). So it's not like his struggles to get where he did were akin to that of Doug Williams. Let alone a modern day Coalhouse Walker Jr, loaded with talent and determination, never able to capitalize on it because of racism. Kaepernick has had many opportunities, and unless he just blew through the millions he made in recent years ($12m alone last season), is by any reasonable measure wealthy, part of the 1%.

I think what may be most interesting to me is that now I really do want to hear what Kaepernick has to say. I want to hear his thoughts on racial inequality, and how market politics plays into that, as Moore noted. If anyone has seen the film Free State of Jones, I would have to think that must have really resonated with Kaepernick. But if Kap is ever to play in the NFL again, I imagine the last thing he's going to do is talk more about this complicated issue, and in some ways, that's unforunate.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/columnist/nancy-armour/2017/07/19/colin-kaepernick-michael-vick-hair-activism-image/489734001/#
It seems that the people who think he is finished in the NFL are adamant. They think it's done and dusted and say he has no chance whatsoever of a return. But I still think that the lack of input from himself about the game and his future isn't helping. The odd thing is that he is willing to comment on everything else.
 
on3m@n@rmy said:
Chubb drilled that 600 lbs like it was only 100!

EE: like I said above somewhere, if there was DV he should be punished, but I have my doubts because not only has the NFL not said anything, but neither have the real investigators. Was it just a case of a mad girl? An opportunistic girl? Something should be stated one way or the other by the police.
 
Re:

movingtarget said:
Agree with the docs that the sample data is biased, and that there is a problem regardless. But for Jerry Jones to reject that there is a connection between football and CTE is insanity:
Jones has rejected the belief that there is a link between football and C.T.E.
 
Re: Re:

movingtarget said:
Alpe d'Huez said:
RG3 apparently working out for the Chargers.

Interesting article on Kaepernick, and why he's really persona non grata in the NFL.
Kaepernick has never done anything heinous or even criminal. His great sin wasn’t even disrespecting the anthem, the flag, the military or any of the other excuses that have been used over the last year to negate his message.

Rather, it was his audacity in calling out police brutality in communities of color and the economic system that’s at the root of it that is deemed unforgivable.

Other athletes have walked a finer line, condemning systemic racism while also calling for “personal responsibility” when it comes to black-on-black crime. Not Kaepernick. The former San Francisco 49ers quarterback pointed the finger squarely at everyone who has benefited from the system and done little more than watch as people of color are kept on the outside looking in.

“He attacked capitalism and the system that was created with systemic racism,” said Louis Moore, a history professor at Grand Valley State in Michigan and author of We Will Win the Day: The Civil Rights Movement, the Black Athlete and the Quest for Equality.

“His belief is, you solve this problem, the violence is going to take care of itself,” Moore said. “I think that’s what made people uncomfortable. It’s never acknowledged why racism and capitalism are intertwined.”
This is pretty interesting, and the article goes into why Michael Vick's comments on Kaepernick getting a haircut and looking the part are part of the problem, not solution. Considering that Kaeprnick didn't respond to Vick, but tweeted a definition of Stockholm Syndrome adds another layer.

But if you look at it from a broad view, Kaepernick has benefited greatly from this very system financially. And he was given a great opportunity to start for an outstanding team when they already had a QB who was winning (Alex Smith). So it's not like his struggles to get where he did were akin to that of Doug Williams. Let alone a modern day Coalhouse Walker Jr, loaded with talent and determination, never able to capitalize on it because of racism. Kaepernick has had many opportunities, and unless he just blew through the millions he made in recent years ($12m alone last season), is by any reasonable measure wealthy, part of the 1%.

I think what may be most interesting to me is that now I really do want to hear what Kaepernick has to say. I want to hear his thoughts on racial inequality, and how market politics plays into that, as Moore noted. If anyone has seen the film Free State of Jones, I would have to think that must have really resonated with Kaepernick. But if Kap is ever to play in the NFL again, I imagine the last thing he's going to do is talk more about this complicated issue, and in some ways, that's unforunate.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/columnist/nancy-armour/2017/07/19/colin-kaepernick-michael-vick-hair-activism-image/489734001/#
It seems that the people who think he is finished in the NFL are adamant. They think it's done and dusted and say he has no chance whatsoever of a return. But I still think that the lack of input from himself about the game and his future isn't helping. The odd thing is that he is willing to comment on everything else.
So instead of signing RG3, Chargers trade with Bills for QB Cardale Jones. Some translate that to mean SD did not think much of Griffin's workout.
http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2724021-cardale-jones-traded-by-bills-to-chargers-for-conditional-7th-round-draft-pick
 
Must feel strange for Kaep and RGIII to go from starting jobs to even a lack of phone calls. The odd one at best ! I wonder how it would have gone for the injury prone Romo and the less than motivated Cutler if they hadn't retired ? Something tells me not a hell of a lot better considering the money those two would be looking for. I think they both made the right move for different reasons.
 
Re: Re:

on3m@n@rmy said:
movingtarget said:
Alpe d'Huez said:
RG3 apparently working out for the Chargers.

Interesting article on Kaepernick, and why he's really persona non grata in the NFL.
Kaepernick has never done anything heinous or even criminal. His great sin wasn’t even disrespecting the anthem, the flag, the military or any of the other excuses that have been used over the last year to negate his message.

Rather, it was his audacity in calling out police brutality in communities of color and the economic system that’s at the root of it that is deemed unforgivable.

Other athletes have walked a finer line, condemning systemic racism while also calling for “personal responsibility” when it comes to black-on-black crime. Not Kaepernick. The former San Francisco 49ers quarterback pointed the finger squarely at everyone who has benefited from the system and done little more than watch as people of color are kept on the outside looking in.

“He attacked capitalism and the system that was created with systemic racism,” said Louis Moore, a history professor at Grand Valley State in Michigan and author of We Will Win the Day: The Civil Rights Movement, the Black Athlete and the Quest for Equality.

“His belief is, you solve this problem, the violence is going to take care of itself,” Moore said. “I think that’s what made people uncomfortable. It’s never acknowledged why racism and capitalism are intertwined.”
This is pretty interesting, and the article goes into why Michael Vick's comments on Kaepernick getting a haircut and looking the part are part of the problem, not solution. Considering that Kaeprnick didn't respond to Vick, but tweeted a definition of Stockholm Syndrome adds another layer.

But if you look at it from a broad view, Kaepernick has benefited greatly from this very system financially. And he was given a great opportunity to start for an outstanding team when they already had a QB who was winning (Alex Smith). So it's not like his struggles to get where he did were akin to that of Doug Williams. Let alone a modern day Coalhouse Walker Jr, loaded with talent and determination, never able to capitalize on it because of racism. Kaepernick has had many opportunities, and unless he just blew through the millions he made in recent years ($12m alone last season), is by any reasonable measure wealthy, part of the 1%.

I think what may be most interesting to me is that now I really do want to hear what Kaepernick has to say. I want to hear his thoughts on racial inequality, and how market politics plays into that, as Moore noted. If anyone has seen the film Free State of Jones, I would have to think that must have really resonated with Kaepernick. But if Kap is ever to play in the NFL again, I imagine the last thing he's going to do is talk more about this complicated issue, and in some ways, that's unforunate.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/columnist/nancy-armour/2017/07/19/colin-kaepernick-michael-vick-hair-activism-image/489734001/#
It seems that the people who think he is finished in the NFL are adamant. They think it's done and dusted and say he has no chance whatsoever of a return. But I still think that the lack of input from himself about the game and his future isn't helping. The odd thing is that he is willing to comment on everything else.
So instead of signing RG3, Chargers trade with Bills for QB Cardale Jones. Some translate that to mean SD did not think much of Griffin's workout.
They probably don't want to take a risk on him. RGIII has a significant injury history now after only five years in the league. He ruptured the ACL in his right knee twice; once in college at Baylor and again in his rookie season with the Skins. A re-tear of a reconstructed ACL for an athlete can be problematic and there's concern on how well the joint will function long-term. He's also had several other injuries of concern including last year's shoulder problem that kept him out for 11 or so games. Sadly, he appears to be injury prone & you can't have a 2nd overall pick sitting on the bench either.

http://sportsinjurypredictor.com/player/robert-griffin-iii/5058
 
Re: Re:

That is a little surprising about Jones, and RG3. Jones mostly as he was sort of a project for the Bills. A lot of physical tools, who just needs more time to grow. So to give him up is interesting. The Chargers called RG3's workout "good", which means "nothing impressive, so thanks, but no thanks" after trading for Jones.

Regarding Kaepernick:
movingtarget said:
But I still think that the lack of input from himself about the game and his future isn't helping. The odd thing is that he is willing to comment on everything else.
Well, he's not saying that much of late, but what he does say, still seems politically or socially oriented. Even looking at his tweet response to Vick about Stockholm Syndrome (or am I just assuming it was aimed at Vick?). It's almost like everything the guy utters has a chance to be a political powder keg, and that must be what teams fear most of all.

The one thing I don't get though is this, cutting him mid-season for saying something political would be really bad press for any team, but from camp through the pre-season is a great time to float giving him a shot. You can see how well he plays, and what he says and how fans and the media react. If it turns bad, you can cut him for any number of football related reasons and not have it stand out - performance, style, going a different direction, etc. and not too many people will blink.

As I said before, he's going to be a distraction on any team, but he will be a distraction you are well aware of, and can potentially control. Compare that to someone like Albert Haynsworth.
 
Re: Re:

Nomad said:
on3m@n@rmy said:
movingtarget said:
Alpe d'Huez said:
RG3 apparently working out for the Chargers.

Interesting article on Kaepernick, and why he's really persona non grata in the NFL.
Kaepernick has never done anything heinous or even criminal. His great sin wasn’t even disrespecting the anthem, the flag, the military or any of the other excuses that have been used over the last year to negate his message.

Rather, it was his audacity in calling out police brutality in communities of color and the economic system that’s at the root of it that is deemed unforgivable.

Other athletes have walked a finer line, condemning systemic racism while also calling for “personal responsibility” when it comes to black-on-black crime. Not Kaepernick. The former San Francisco 49ers quarterback pointed the finger squarely at everyone who has benefited from the system and done little more than watch as people of color are kept on the outside looking in.

“He attacked capitalism and the system that was created with systemic racism,” said Louis Moore, a history professor at Grand Valley State in Michigan and author of We Will Win the Day: The Civil Rights Movement, the Black Athlete and the Quest for Equality.

“His belief is, you solve this problem, the violence is going to take care of itself,” Moore said. “I think that’s what made people uncomfortable. It’s never acknowledged why racism and capitalism are intertwined.”
This is pretty interesting, and the article goes into why Michael Vick's comments on Kaepernick getting a haircut and looking the part are part of the problem, not solution. Considering that Kaeprnick didn't respond to Vick, but tweeted a definition of Stockholm Syndrome adds another layer.

But if you look at it from a broad view, Kaepernick has benefited greatly from this very system financially. And he was given a great opportunity to start for an outstanding team when they already had a QB who was winning (Alex Smith). So it's not like his struggles to get where he did were akin to that of Doug Williams. Let alone a modern day Coalhouse Walker Jr, loaded with talent and determination, never able to capitalize on it because of racism. Kaepernick has had many opportunities, and unless he just blew through the millions he made in recent years ($12m alone last season), is by any reasonable measure wealthy, part of the 1%.

I think what may be most interesting to me is that now I really do want to hear what Kaepernick has to say. I want to hear his thoughts on racial inequality, and how market politics plays into that, as Moore noted. If anyone has seen the film Free State of Jones, I would have to think that must have really resonated with Kaepernick. But if Kap is ever to play in the NFL again, I imagine the last thing he's going to do is talk more about this complicated issue, and in some ways, that's unforunate.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/columnist/nancy-armour/2017/07/19/colin-kaepernick-michael-vick-hair-activism-image/489734001/#
It seems that the people who think he is finished in the NFL are adamant. They think it's done and dusted and say he has no chance whatsoever of a return. But I still think that the lack of input from himself about the game and his future isn't helping. The odd thing is that he is willing to comment on everything else.
So instead of signing RG3, Chargers trade with Bills for QB Cardale Jones. Some translate that to mean SD did not think much of Griffin's workout.
They probably don't want to take a risk on him. RGIII has a significant injury history now after only five years in the league. He ruptured the ACL in his right knee twice; once in college at Baylor and again in his rookie season with the Skins. A re-tear of a reconstructed ACL for an athlete can be problematic and there's concern on how well the joint will function long-term. He's also had several other injuries of concern including last year's shoulder problem that kept him out for 11 or so games. Sadly, he appears to be injury prone & you can't have a 2nd overall pick sitting on the bench either.

http://sportsinjurypredictor.com/player/robert-griffin-iii/5058
Yeah RGIII being signed comes with significant risk like Romo but it would be interesting to see what sort of contract he would accept and what teams would be willing to pay for him. As a back up probably one year contracts only but then Manziel is at the Saints which is also a risk if the past is any indication. Whether they keep him is another thing. I really thought the Jets would have given Kaep a shot but it seems that some people think that the Jets are on the tank trajectory and the rebuild to come and expect the coach to be also gone sometime this season.
 
Re: Re:

Alpe d'Huez said:
That is a little surprising about Jones, and RG3. Jones mostly as he was sort of a project for the Bills. A lot of physical tools, who just needs more time to grow. So to give him up is interesting. The Chargers called RG3's workout "good", which means "nothing impressive, so thanks, but no thanks" after trading for Jones.

Regarding Kaepernick:
movingtarget said:
But I still think that the lack of input from himself about the game and his future isn't helping. The odd thing is that he is willing to comment on everything else.
Well, he's not saying that much of late, but what he does say, still seems politically or socially oriented. Even looking at his tweet response to Vick about Stockholm Syndrome (or am I just assuming it was aimed at Vick?). It's almost like everything the guy utters has a chance to be a political powder keg, and that must be what teams fear most of all.

The one thing I don't get though is this, cutting him mid-season for saying something political would be really bad press for any team, but from camp through the pre-season is a great time to float giving him a shot. You can see how well he plays, and what he says and how fans and the media react. If it turns bad, you can cut him for any number of football related reasons and not have it stand out - performance, style, going a different direction, etc. and not too many people will blink.

As I said before, he's going to be a distraction on any team, but he will be a distraction you are well aware of, and can potentially control. Compare that to someone like Albert Haynsworth.
Well he has already said he won't be kneeling anymore and that protest is finished with but some teams may be wary about his opinions of course. The odd thing is that the 49ers players gave him the player's player award last season which indicated it wasn't a distraction for them and they admired what he was trying to do. The 49ers major issues were on field, they had a mediocre team that played mediocre football and even though Kaep was receiving all the press, I think without the protest the 2-14 season would have been pretty much the same. Chip Kelly also made it clear from the beginning of the season that he had no problems with the protest and many NFL commentators think that the 49er's management handled the situation very well.
 
Re: Re:

Nomad said:
on3m@n@rmy said:
movingtarget said:
Alpe d'Huez said:
RG3 apparently working out for the Chargers.

Interesting article on Kaepernick, and why he's really persona non grata in the NFL.
Kaepernick has never done anything heinous or even criminal. His great sin wasn’t even disrespecting the anthem, the flag, the military or any of the other excuses that have been used over the last year to negate his message.

Rather, it was his audacity in calling out police brutality in communities of color and the economic system that’s at the root of it that is deemed unforgivable.

Other athletes have walked a finer line, condemning systemic racism while also calling for “personal responsibility” when it comes to black-on-black crime. Not Kaepernick. The former San Francisco 49ers quarterback pointed the finger squarely at everyone who has benefited from the system and done little more than watch as people of color are kept on the outside looking in.

“He attacked capitalism and the system that was created with systemic racism,” said Louis Moore, a history professor at Grand Valley State in Michigan and author of We Will Win the Day: The Civil Rights Movement, the Black Athlete and the Quest for Equality.

“His belief is, you solve this problem, the violence is going to take care of itself,” Moore said. “I think that’s what made people uncomfortable. It’s never acknowledged why racism and capitalism are intertwined.”
This is pretty interesting, and the article goes into why Michael Vick's comments on Kaepernick getting a haircut and looking the part are part of the problem, not solution. Considering that Kaeprnick didn't respond to Vick, but tweeted a definition of Stockholm Syndrome adds another layer.

But if you look at it from a broad view, Kaepernick has benefited greatly from this very system financially. And he was given a great opportunity to start for an outstanding team when they already had a QB who was winning (Alex Smith). So it's not like his struggles to get where he did were akin to that of Doug Williams. Let alone a modern day Coalhouse Walker Jr, loaded with talent and determination, never able to capitalize on it because of racism. Kaepernick has had many opportunities, and unless he just blew through the millions he made in recent years ($12m alone last season), is by any reasonable measure wealthy, part of the 1%.

I think what may be most interesting to me is that now I really do want to hear what Kaepernick has to say. I want to hear his thoughts on racial inequality, and how market politics plays into that, as Moore noted. If anyone has seen the film Free State of Jones, I would have to think that must have really resonated with Kaepernick. But if Kap is ever to play in the NFL again, I imagine the last thing he's going to do is talk more about this complicated issue, and in some ways, that's unforunate.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/columnist/nancy-armour/2017/07/19/colin-kaepernick-michael-vick-hair-activism-image/489734001/#
It seems that the people who think he is finished in the NFL are adamant. They think it's done and dusted and say he has no chance whatsoever of a return. But I still think that the lack of input from himself about the game and his future isn't helping. The odd thing is that he is willing to comment on everything else.
So instead of signing RG3, Chargers trade with Bills for QB Cardale Jones. Some translate that to mean SD did not think much of Griffin's workout.
They probably don't want to take a risk on him. RGIII has a significant injury history now after only five years in the league. He ruptured the ACL in his right knee twice; once in college at Baylor and again in his rookie season with the Skins. A re-tear of a reconstructed ACL for an athlete can be problematic and there's concern on how well the joint will function long-term. He's also had several other injuries of concern including last year's shoulder problem that kept him out for 11 or so games. Sadly, he appears to be injury prone & you can't have a 2nd overall pick sitting on the bench either.

http://sportsinjurypredictor.com/player/robert-griffin-iii/5058
The CBA kills a guy like RG. If he could negotiate an "injury clause" into his contract maybe someone would take a chance, but he costs to much to just stand around on crutches.
Its an interesting time behind center these days!
 
Speaking of the Ravens, there was talk that with Flacco out for a bit, they would work Kaepernick out, since his old coach is brothers with the coach, and he played for some of the other coaches.

Instead, the team just up and signed David Olson. Done, thank you. If you weren't sure, the Ravens also have Ryan Mallett, and Dustin Vaughn (who has never played a down in the NFL in three seasons, often moving from practice squad to practice squad), and in case you couldn't quite place the name, David Olson was the QB last year for the Kansas City Phantoms of the Champions Indoor Football league.

With that pedigree, there's no wonder the Ravens had no interest in Kaepernick.
 
Re:

Alpe d'Huez said:
Speaking of the Ravens, there was talk that with Flacco out for a bit, they would work Kaepernick out, since his old coach is brothers with the coach, and he played for some of the other coaches.

Instead, the team just up and signed David Olson. Done, thank you. If you weren't sure, the Ravens also have Ryan Mallett, and Dustin Vaughn (who has never played a down in the NFL in three seasons, often moving from practice squad to practice squad), and in case you couldn't quite place the name, David Olson was the QB last year for the Kansas City Phantoms of the Champions Indoor Football league.

With that pedigree, there's no wonder the Ravens had no interest in Kaepernick.
That kind of stuff make me wonder if Kaep is blackballed.
 
Re: Re:

jmdirt said:
Alpe d'Huez said:
Speaking of the Ravens, there was talk that with Flacco out for a bit, they would work Kaepernick out, since his old coach is brothers with the coach, and he played for some of the other coaches.

Instead, the team just up and signed David Olson. Done, thank you. If you weren't sure, the Ravens also have Ryan Mallett, and Dustin Vaughn (who has never played a down in the NFL in three seasons, often moving from practice squad to practice squad), and in case you couldn't quite place the name, David Olson was the QB last year for the Kansas City Phantoms of the Champions Indoor Football league.

With that pedigree, there's no wonder the Ravens had no interest in Kaepernick.
That kind of stuff make me wonder if Kaep is blackballed.
No need to wonder anymore ! Maybe the teams where the coaches are interested don't have owners who are interested ? The final test will happen when QBs start going down with injuries but that can be a problem as well if the season is underway and he has to learn a new system. Looking at some of the dodgy quality back ups being signed it seems that some teams really can't afford to have QBs getting injured. Vikings were smart enough to pick up Bradford even though their good start went pear shaped.
 
I happen to think that's an even poorer idea, here's why:

With Kaepernick he's a somewhat unique, different QB on the field, if he's on your roster now, you'll have time to develop at least some offensive plans around his skills, if he has to come into a game on short notice. He can also get used to working with the offense in this regard. He's also going to be a distraction no matter what, even if he says nothing. By signing him now, you can much better anticipate, if not control, spin, etc. that distraction with your PR and marketing departments. If you are in the middle of the season and have to sign him as an emergency, that all goes out the window.

I don't think it's going to happen anyway. I think at this point he's persona non grata, blacklisted from the sport.
 
Re:

Alpe d'Huez said:
I happen to think that's an even poorer idea, here's why:

With Kaepernick he's a somewhat unique, different QB on the field, if he's on your roster now, you'll have time to develop at least some offensive plans around his skills, if he has to come into a game on short notice. He can also get used to working with the offense in this regard. He's also going to be a distraction no matter what, even if he says nothing. By signing him now, you can much better anticipate, if not control, spin, etc. that distraction with your PR and marketing departments. If you are in the middle of the season and have to sign him as an emergency, that all goes out the window.

I don't think it's going to happen anyway. I think at this point he's persona non grata, blacklisted from the sport.
IF, he ends up playing this ^ seems like a good strategy. Bring him in now, let the media go nuts, then hopefully get past him now instead of later. Maybe teams are waiting for a big story to blow up in the NFL so they can sign him while no one is paying attention.
 

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