Race Design Thread

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Deutschland Tour stage 8: Bad Bergzabern-Le Markstein (219 km)
Finally, the first high mountain stage. Although there aren't so many difficult mountain passes in Germany, this country has the great advantage that there are many posiblities for nice stages near the frontier. I will also use some passes in austria in the second week but in this stage I concentrated on the vosges. The peloton will pass the frontier after only 10 km. Henceforward this stage will only be in france but always near germany. Again the first half of the route will be completely flat but then there are hardly any flat sections for around 100 km (only some false flat). The climbing starts with a bump to lavancelle, a small village. After a short descent and the false flat section I mentioned before there are two 3rd category climbs in a row: the col des bagenelles and the col du calvaire. The descent is interrupted by the col du wettstein (which isn't categorized). Then the riders arrive in Munster where the serious part of the stage begins. the Petit Ballon and the Col du Platzerwasel are two first category climbs you might know from last years tour de france. After the second one there isn't really a descent. There is only a 6 km long false flat section up to the finish in the ski station "Le Markstein" (you probably know le markstein as a pass from the tour the france, but there is enough space to finish a stage up there).


Bad Bergzabern:

Le Markstein:

Petit Ballon profile:

Col du Platzerwasel:



climbs:
la vancelle (4th cat.)
col des bagenelles (3rd cat.)
col du calvaire (3rd cat.)
Petit Ballon (1st cat.)
Col du Platzerwasel (1st cat.)
 
Somewhat ironically, given Gigs_98 is currently taking a Deutschlandtour out of Germany, I'm going to start my Giro (by popular request of two people) there. This is a bit of an unusual Giro route, I've tried to be a bit more unconventional but also reflect the fact that since Vegni took over the insanity of the Zomegnan days is something of a thing of the past, for better or (more) for worse. Therefore this is my attempt at a "humane" Grand Tour, after some of the stages I've launched in the past (260km to Mont du Chat over 6 cat.1 or HC climbs? 250km descent finish in Aosta with 5 cat.1 or HC climbs?). Like ever, I have tried to avoid using the same climbs (at least from the same side) as in previous routes, although I allowed myself one exception.

Oh, and yes, I'm another cronoescalada *** now. In fact, retracing a bunch of stages I'd already planned out on MMR or openrunner on cronoescalada in order to get the profiles to follow consistently with the rest of the race(s - I have also got a Vuelta and most of a Tour ready for posting, but am doing the Giro first as requested) is part of what's delayed me getting the libraries back up to speed... I'm getting there, I promise, but it's bit by bit.

OK - IL GIRO!!!

Stage 1: Monaco di Baviera - Monaco di Baviera, 187km





GPM:
Schöne Aussicht am Irschenberg (cat.4) 5,2km @ 4,6%

Traguardo Volanti:
Grafing

Yes, it's a bit of a novelty for the Giro - beginning in Germany. Although the Bayern Rundfahrt also takes place in May, it has traditionally been held in late May, alongside the Ronde van België and so if it goes back to that slot, there shouldn't be any trouble with the Grande Partenza affecting the local race. And if the Germans can be slowly brought back onside with cycling, as seems to be the case (there are rumours of a Deutschlandtour revival next year, and more attention is being paid to the sport with the "new clean generation" of German talents coming to the fore), then what better way than to bring the Giro? As a result, the first few days will take place around the south of Bavaria, or Baviera as the Italians call it. The name of Munich in Italian is Monaco, and therefore we need to specify Monaco di Baviera in order to differentiate itself from the Grand Départ of the 2009 Tour de France. The pre-race presentations will take place in the scenic Marienplatz, ensuring a suitably grand setting - imagine this bedecked in pink, awaiting the arrival of the stars of the day.



Of course, since the downfall of the likes of Ullrich, German cycling has been primarily about two things, which do tie in to the history of the sport in the country. The first is the Zeitfahrt, exemplified by the Tony Martins of this world, and the second is sprinting. Although it isn't the most exciting way to start off a Grand Tour, we are going to have a sprint stage which begins and ends in Munich, looping around to the east of the city to take in some of the expanses of countryside that lies in the flatlands from which the Bayrischer Wald and the Alps emerge to the East and South respectively. As with most opening weekend flat stages, there's a single GPM classified climb for the breakaway to duke out - here for the comparatively simplistic climb of Schöne Aussicht am Irschenberg, a lookout point with some impressive views of the Alps that will await the riders as the race continues. The climb is early in the stage, and afterward we head north and spend a while along the banks of the river Inn, at least until Wasserburg am Inn, a scenic town turned into a peninsula by a bend in the river, perhaps best known at present as the hometown of biathlon starlet Franziska Preuß. Here, we turn inland via a short, punchy and uncategorized climb and start to head back towards München, mostly via some moderately exposed roads, so around the time of the intermediate sprint in Grafing, riders will have to start taking some care that they are vigilant if the weather is a little windy.



The riders return to Münich with about 30k to go, however we aren't finishing back where we started, instead the riders will head up past Englischer Garten to do two laps of a 9,7km circuit at the 1972 Olympic park. The majority of the circuit is on some wide roads to minimize the danger, although as we saw from the Genoa stage of the 2015 Giro last week, this isn't a guarantor of success. The final 2 kilometres have some gentle bends and are on slightly narrower roads as the péloton negotiates the Spiridon-Louis-Ring, literally passing in the shadow of the Olympic stadium; the object being to make it a little harder to control but have fewer people fighting for space at the front - and allow the potential for a late attacker to get out of sight of the leadouts, before the final 500m are dead straight. This will be a sprint, but the aim is to make it less dangerous, so the main lead-in until the trains are fully set will be on wide roads, and the last section will be such that people from well down in the bunch can't cause accidents by trying to get right up in the mix as they'll be negotiating the same bends - but not full-blown corners, so longer racing lines will not be beneficial. And the road isn't that narrow anyway, plus the parkland plus the Olympic stadia will make for dramatic scenery for the showdown at the end.

 
Stage 2: Monaco di Baviera - Garmisch-Partenkirchen, 231km





GPM:
Holzleitensattel (cat.4) 7,0km @ 4,5%
Buchener Sattel (cat.2) 7,8km @ 7,9%
Gsteig (Kaltenbrunn)(cat.4) 2,7km @ 6,3%

Traguardo Volanti:
Mittenwald

As ever with the Giro, there is little time to spend letting the pure sprinters trade the jersey on bonus seconds; it's nice to shake things up a bit early. And hence why our second day is this lengthy, border-hopping trip through the foothills of the Bavarian and Austrian Alps. As with yesterday, we begin in the centre of Munich, but this time we're heading southwest, directly towards the border, with the Alps looming in front of us, and looking to play their part in the early running in this race.

For the most part, the first half of the stage is flat to rolling, slowly heading uphill. The distance from München to perhaps Germany's most famous alpine resort town, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, is just 90km, so of course there's a bit of looping around to be done. The first time we reach town, we only touch the northern side of it on the way past; heading past the top of Garmisch (the two municipalities of Garmisch - slightly more modern - and Partenkirchen - slightly more traditional - were merged in the 1930s in order to make the bid for the 1936 Winter Olympics more attractive. It worked, and the stadia from those games are still in operation today, in particular the Olympiaschanze, the ski jump which hosts the Four Hills every season).



After this, we head for the border with Austria, handily marked with flags on the profile. After a lengthy period of false flat, the riders hit Fernpass (the old Fernpass), which is uncategorized due to an average over 9km of a little over 2,5%. It's fairly unspectacular but sees an end to the climbing, as it is followed by a fast and wide descent into the beautifully scenic Nassereith. We're very much in the Alps now, so it's only fitting we start climbing, although this is only an intermediate stage. First up is Holzleitensattel, 7km at a fairly consistent gradient of 4,5%. Descending from this takes us to the famous market town of Telfs.



After this, the route back north towards the German border is a tough one; the riders go by the hardest climb of the weekend, the second-category Buchener Sattel. It's a challenging grind, again more or less consistent - however this time the consistent gradient is of a much tougher 8%; lasting 8km at this kind of gradient we can expect to see many of the Guardinis, Kittels and Cavendishes of this world wave goodbye to the bunch at this point, even though there are some 60km remaining at the summit. There's then just shy of 20km until the intermediate sprint in the scenic border town of Mittenwald, its chocolate-box houses sitting beneath the imposing shadow of Karwendel.



There's the possibility some bonus seconds will be available to people that count here, if the break has been gobbled up, but with 42km remaining, probably not. From here it's a downhill false flat into Garmisch-Partenkirchen with the occasional steeper ramp of descent; upon arriving in town the riders then go over a bridge and complete a figure of 8 shaped circuit taking in Am Kurpark and looping to the west of the town to enjoy the sights of the Zugspitze before crossing back to Partenkirchen to cross the finishing line on the historic Ludwigstraße for the first time with 18,6km remaining.

From here we have a course that could make for a quite interesting Worlds course, actually - an 18,6km circuit which begins almost immediately with the only climb. The ascent on the Gsteigstraße up to the cross-country and biathlon facilities at Kaltenbrunn, part of the Mittenwald-Kaltenbrunn talent factory that's given us Martina Glagow, Magdalena Neuner, Miriam Gössner and Laura Dahlmeier among others, is a less consistent one than the previous climbs on the day. The first part of the climb is a fast 200m at 14%, but it evens out somewhat, averaging 6,3% over 2,7km. It's very much puncheur territory; cresting with 13.6km remaining it offers a pretty tempting opportunity to make a move, however as there's been some rest phase after Buchener Sattel, how big will the group that people are trying to get away from be? This will be key as after the crest of the climb and the sharp right-hand turn to rejoin the descent from Mittenwald for its steepest 3km, the rest of the course - around 10km - is pretty flat, and so riders will need to know how much of a gap they need. Can the likes of Michael Matthews and Juanjo Lobato survive this one? Will the likes of Gilbert take a flyer on it and get away? In view of some tough climbs in the middle of the stage and the likelihood that a pure sprinter will have the maglia rosa and will therefore be unlikely to defend it unless they are a Matthews or a Lobato type, will the leader's team let the breakaway go and result in some management being needed by the GC favourites? Lots of possibilities here, which is a good way to start the race.

Finishing straight:
 
Garmisch-Partenkirchen! Most beautiful town in Bavaria with the best coat of arms. Sorry for the superfluous reaction but I couldn't resist.

Objectively, that finishing straight is as good as it gets.
 
Jul 2, 2012
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Oviedo - Navaliego (219km)
This stage starts with some rolling terrain including the climb to El Rubial (3.1km@6%,cat4), then there are about 30km of false flat before the main difficulty of the day, the consistent decently steep ascent to El Puerto (11.3km@6.8%, cat2), which is followed by some flats before the descent and intermediate sprint at Pola de Lena. A short uncategorized climb of about 2.8km@4.8% prepares the riders for the short, but not unselective, hill top finish at Navaliego (4.4km@6.5%, cat3). This stage might go to a breakaway or someone who likes to attack on short climbs near the finish.

 
Gigs_98 said:
Are you a winter sport fan? It seems like you are one, because you mention all these things about the Olympiaschanze and the Mitterwald-Kaltenbrunn talent factory. :D
Libertine created a Giro del Trentino just based on cross country skiing and biathlon. So if you dont think that she is from doing that, then i'd be shocked.
 
Deutschland Tour stage 9: Mulhouse-Waldshut Tiengen (147 km)
After the first hard mountain stage the race won't become easier (or at least not much easier). After I already had some hilly stages in my first week, this one is definitely something for the attackers or at least there is hardly any scenario in which this stage ends in a bunch sprint. After stage 8 was in the vosges and in the last week there will be some alp stages this one is a tour through the "Schwarzwald" a low mountain range in the south-west of germany.
We start in france, exactly in müllhausen (german for mulhouse, so yes its the city where many tdf stages finished, like the stage won by tony martin in last years edition). After the first flat 25 km the race starts to become difficult. The first climb of the day, the Kreuzweg, is probably the most difficult one with 10,4 km with an average gain of 6,8 % (if quaeldich´s numbers are correct :D ). The next climb starts directly after a long and mostly flat descent and goes up to Gresgen. This climb is very steep but not that long. Again the next pass starts directly after the descent. This climb is called Gersbach and after another flat descent the last difficult climb of this "up and down" stage begins. The ascent starts quite difficult and doesn't become flatter until a short flat section/ descent 4 km before the top of the climb. After this easy section the street starts to rise again, however not as steep as before. On the top of the pass there is a huge reservoir, not that pretty but really impressive.
The next flat descent follows but after this one there are no more big climbs in this stage only two bumps. The first one goes to the little village Hohenfels the second one is the Gurtweiler straße. After this 4th category climb there are only 6 km left before the riders arrive in Waldshut Tiengen.


Mulhouse:

Waldshut Tiengen

Hornbergbecken:

climbs:
Kreuzweg (1st cat.)
Gresgen (3rd cat.)
Gersbach (2nd cat.)
Hornbergbecken (1st cat.)
Hohenfels (4th cat.)
Gurtweiler Straße (4th cat.)
 
Jun 30, 2014
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Stage 16 Darfo Boario Terme - Bellagio; 174,9km


The third week of my Giro starts with a nice medium mountain stage.
The stage starts in Darfo Boario Terme and the first 39km are rolling terrain or false flat. Then the first climb of the day starts, Passo di Zambla, 13,5km at 6,5%. After the descent we have 12km of false flat, then the next climb starts, Culmine San Pietro, 22km at 3,9% but with a max. gradient of 10% and about 6km of flase flat between the steeper parts of the climb.
After the descent we have 13km of false flat, the small climbs on the profile are just short tunnels, then we have Valbrona, 5,1km at 5,7%, 4,8km of flase flat and then the final Climb to Madonna di Ghisallo, 9,6km at 5%, but it's an irregular climb with a speeper 2nd part.
The 2nd part of the following descent is pretty technical and will bring the rinders to the beautiful town Bellagio.
This is a nice medium mountain stage, not very long but it could be really hard with bad weather, otherwise the favourites will attack on the 2nd part of the final climb and/or on the following descent.
If they race it properly and set a high pace from the start we could see some gaps, otherwise the stage win should go to a member of the breakaway.
Bellagio:
 
Jun 30, 2014
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Stage 17 Como - Chivasso; 166,9km


An easy transitional stage for the sprinters before the final 2 mountain stages.
Not much to say here, we have a small climb right after the start, 5km at 5,9%, other than that we have 2 other uncategorised climbs, the first one is 3,3km at 4,3%, the 2nd is 1,5km at 7%, but after the final descent we have 10km of flat before the finish.
Like I said, it's a stage for the sprinters and an easy day for the favourites before the final 2 mountain stages.
 
lemon cheese cake said:
Gigs_98 said:
Are you a winter sport fan? It seems like you are one, because you mention all these things about the Olympiaschanze and the Mitterwald-Kaltenbrunn talent factory. :D
Libertine created a Giro del Trentino just based on cross country skiing and biathlon. So if you dont think that she is from doing that, then i'd be shocked.
As you can see, my account is very new so I didn't know she did a race like that. However its nice to know because the only sport I like more than cycling is alpine skiing (and Im a big nordic skiing fan too)
 
Jun 30, 2014
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Gigs_98 said:
lemon cheese cake said:
Gigs_98 said:
Are you a winter sport fan? It seems like you are one, because you mention all these things about the Olympiaschanze and the Mitterwald-Kaltenbrunn talent factory. :D
Libertine created a Giro del Trentino just based on cross country skiing and biathlon. So if you dont think that she is from doing that, then i'd be shocked.
As you can see, my account is very new so I didn't know she did a race like that. However its nice to know because the only sport I like more than cycling is alpine skiing (and Im a big nordic skiing fan too)
Of course you love alpine skiiing, you're Austrian. :D
Just kidding, I'm an alpine skiing fan myself.
 
Gigs_98 said:
lemon cheese cake said:
Gigs_98 said:
Are you a winter sport fan? It seems like you are one, because you mention all these things about the Olympiaschanze and the Mitterwald-Kaltenbrunn talent factory. :D
Libertine created a Giro del Trentino just based on cross country skiing and biathlon. So if you dont think that she is from doing that, then i'd be shocked.
As you can see, my account is very new so I didn't know she did a race like that. However its nice to know because the only sport I like more than cycling is alpine skiing (and Im a big nordic skiing fan too)
You could have been folowing the forum for a while, but just didn't sign up as a member ;) .
 
Mayomaniac said:
Gigs_98 said:
lemon cheese cake said:
Gigs_98 said:
Are you a winter sport fan? It seems like you are one, because you mention all these things about the Olympiaschanze and the Mitterwald-Kaltenbrunn talent factory. :D
Libertine created a Giro del Trentino just based on cross country skiing and biathlon. So if you dont think that she is from doing that, then i'd be shocked.
As you can see, my account is very new so I didn't know she did a race like that. However its nice to know because the only sport I like more than cycling is alpine skiing (and Im a big nordic skiing fan too)
Of course you love alpine skiiing, you're Austrian. :D
Just kidding, I'm an alpine skiing fan myself.
Well I guess the fact that I am austrian is really the reason I like skiing :D
 
Gigs_98 said:
Are you a winter sport fan? It seems like you are one, because you mention all these things about the Olympiaschanze and the Mitterwald-Kaltenbrunn talent factory. :D
Absolumente, as obviously you've been told looking at the exchange below :)
Progsprach said:
Oviedo - Navaliego (219km)
Your big climb in this stage is the Puerto de la Ventana, no?

I'd say Navaliego is a bit too small to finish at even for La Vuelta (we know they love to cram everything into small spaces if it means a steep finale), but descending from there into Cabañaquinta would not be a bad solution. I'm sure Javier Guillén would just use that as an excuse for a Cotobello MTF though.
lemon cheese cake said:
Libertine created a Giro del Trentino just based on cross country skiing and biathlon. So if you dont think that she is from doing that, then i'd be shocked.
Ah yes... also don't forget my Tour de Slovénie had an MTF at Pokljuka, my Deutschland Rundfahrt had a HTF at Oberhof and stages to Clausthal-Zellerfeld and starting at Ruhpolding...

Mayomaniac said:
Gigs_98 said:
As you can see, my account is very new so I didn't know she did a race like that. However its nice to know because the only sport I like more than cycling is alpine skiing (and Im a big nordic skiing fan too)
Of course you love alpine skiiing, you're Austrian. :D
Just kidding, I'm an alpine skiing fan myself.
I'm absolutely a Nordic skiing fan first and foremost among wintersports, especially biathlon, but then I've always gravitated towards endurance sports.

On your point on the German climbs, I'd trust quäldich on paved passes within the site's territorial limits; the biggest flaw it has is not giving you average gradients. On some of the garage ramps and schotter-monstrosities they like to post, gradients can get a bit sketchy but generally they're pretty good.

Edit: oh, and BigMac, obviously I agree. GaPa is a beautiful town with stunning views, a picturesque centre and more wintersports pedigree than you could ever need (but still want nonetheless)
 
With Fauneria away from Campania in his Tirrreno, and Mayomaniac nearly completing his Giro, and Libertine starting her Giro, I shall finally get started on the Giro della Campania:

Giro della Campania Stage 1 Agropoli - Marina di Ascea (108.4km)








Climbs:
San Mauro Cilento
Sella di Catona

Primes:
Agnone Cilento
Pioppi
Santa Barbara

Feed Zone:
Acciaroli

For the first stage, we start on the coastal town of Agropoli. The riders will loop round the coast and onto the main coastal road to head south. From here the race hits the last 100kms of the 2013 Giro stage route. The first prime of the day is at Agnone Cilento just before we hit the first climb of the day. This is the San Mauro Cilento, as used in stage 3 of the 2013 Giro. From here it is a descent towards the feed zone at Acciaroli and the second prime at Pioppi. The final climb of the day comes in the form of the Sella di Catona. On the climb is the third and final prime at Santa Barbara. The technical descent into Marina di Ascea for the finish follows. A finsh line that Luca Paolini knows, as he won that Giro stage I've mentioned before in this post

Start:


Finish:
 
Jul 2, 2012
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Libertine Seguros said:
Your big climb in this stage is the Puerto de la Ventana, no?

I'd say Navaliego is a bit too small to finish at even for La Vuelta (we know they love to cram everything into small spaces if it means a steep finale), but descending from there into Cabañaquinta would not be a bad solution. I'm sure Javier Guillén would just use that as an excuse for a Cotobello MTF though.
Yes, it is. I didn't notice because it was unlabeled in Google Earth (normally at least someone made a photo whose name is the climbs name). Those option do sound a bit more realistic in terms of logistics, I always forget to consider that.
 
Jun 30, 2014
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Stage 18 Chivasso - Jafferau; 162km


Just like stage 14 stage 18 will also be a shorter stage with a steep MTF before a long really hard stage with multiple mountains and no MTF.
The stage starts in Chivasso and the first 56km are false flat, then we have a short easy climb, 5km at 5,1% before an longer and harder one, Borgata Colle Braida 7,6km at 6,4%.
On the top of the climb we have 5km of false flat, then the technical descent will lead the rider into the Val di Susa. After 18km of false flat we have climb that starts in Meana di Susa just like Finestre, 10,7km at 8,3%, I dont know the name of the climb, but it wouldd be another nice climb that you could use before Finestre.
Right after the descent and 4km of false flat we have an easy climb, 4,3km at 5%, followed by 19km of false flat.
Then the final climb of the day starts, Jafferau, 7km at 9% with a max. gradient of 14%.
We should have some action between the GC-riders only on the steep final climb. We won't see any long range attacks on a stage like this but with the queenstage on the next day riders would always try to save some energy, so that's ok.
 
Re: Re:

Progsprach said:
Libertine Seguros said:
Your big climb in this stage is the Puerto de la Ventana, no?

I'd say Navaliego is a bit too small to finish at even for La Vuelta (we know they love to cram everything into small spaces if it means a steep finale), but descending from there into Cabañaquinta would not be a bad solution. I'm sure Javier Guillén would just use that as an excuse for a Cotobello MTF though.
Yes, it is. I didn't notice because it was unlabeled in Google Earth (normally at least someone made a photo whose name is the climbs name). Those option do sound a bit more realistic in terms of logistics, I always forget to consider that.
Going to satellite view helps (especially if you go to http://maps.google.com/lochp so that, for a limited time only, you get the benefit of GOOD google maps, not the new, terrible version) as many have signs, but otherwise www.altimetrias.com is your one-stop shop for Spanish climbs, and one of the greatest things on the internet for traceurs and hobby cyclists. Unfortunately there's no interactive map like quäldich or cyclingcols, but each page includes a map of the climb to tell you where to locate it.
 
Apr 19, 2010
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Mayomaniac said:
Stage 18 Chivasso - Jafferau; 162km
On the top of the climb we have 5km of false flat, then the technical descent will lead the rider into the Val di Susa. After 18km of false flat we have climb that starts in Meana di Susa just like Finestre, 10,7km at 8,3%, I dont know the name of the climb, but it would be another nice climb that you could use before Finestre.
It would, but I think the side you are descending would first need to be paved (or at least maintained a bit, it is in quite a bad state for road cycling).
 
Jun 30, 2014
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Stage 19 Oulx - Entracque; 224,6km
Part 1:

Part 2:

The climbs:
Passo del Montginevro; 11,7km at 5%
Col d’Izoard ; 19km at 5,8%
Colle dell'Agnello; 21km at 6,5%
Colle di Sampeyre; 15,6km at 8,5%
Colle Fauniera; 22km at 7,1%
Madonna del Coletto; 6,7km at 8,2%
This Giro still lacked something, we still need a hard mountain stage at high altitude and here you have it. :)
The stage starts in Oulx and a few km of false flat the riders will have to climb Montginevro as the first climb of the day, but it's nothing but a warm-up if you look at the other climbs that they'll have to climb later.
After the easy descent to Briancon they'll have to climb the Col d’Izoard and the Colle dell'Agnello right after it, those 2 should already tire the riders and decimate the main group. The Agnello descent is very long, even if the 2nd part isn't very steep.
Then the 2 main climbs of the day, Sampeyre and Fauniera, both stunning and very hard. I've picked the easier of the 2 Sampeyre descents because by doing that I'm able to eliminate the few km of false flat between both climbs. The Sampeyre descent is still hard enough, even if you can't compare it to the brutal Fauniera descent.
In 1999 Savoldelli was able to gain 2'30“ on Pantani on the descent and Pantani was a pretty good descender on his own. Not a single one of todays gc-condenders comes even close to Savoldelli's descending skills, but you could see huge gaps between good and bad descenders.
After the decent to Demonte ends the final climb of the day still awaits the riders, Madonna del Coletto, a short but steep climb with a tricky descent
The final 6km from Valdieri to Entraque are flat, the riders will have to attack before Madonna del Coletto, but with the stage being full of very hard climbs at high altitude and stage 20 being something like a final parade for the sprinters that shouldn't be a problem. You also have to remember that the fina l stage of the Giro will be a nearly totally flat ITT, so this will be the last chance for the climbers to gain some time before the final over 30km long ITT.
I think this should be a worthy queenstage :)
Entracque:
 
Re: Re:

lemon cheese cake said:
Scrap the tour I cant be bothered at the moment.
Although the course of the real tour is often a (huge) letdown, it's quite entertaining to try to design a varied Tour de France course. In my opinion more so than designing a Giro or Vuelta. This mainly because of the geography of France in comparison with its two neighbours. Spain has some minor mountain ranges scattered all over its area and it is more difficult to find flat regions in Italy than it is to find hilly or mountainous ones. France on the other hand, has an almost dead flat northwestern half, with some isolated hilly regions (mainly everything "above" the diagonal between Bayonne and Strasbourg) and a very hilly/mountainous Southeastern half (everything "under" the mentioned diagonal). Add to that that mainland France is a bit bigger than Spain and a lot bigger than Italy, which makes it very difficult to cover the whole country in "just" three weeks.

Those reasons make possible to design a Zomegnan-esque Tour de France in southeastern France (a region more or less as big as mainland Italy), but there's no fun in doing that, in my opinion.

To show it is very well possible to create a varied Tour de France, which covers more of France than the real Tour usually does the last decades, I'll present my second Tour Complet de France. For those who missed the first: I'll design a Tour with at least one start or finish location in every of the 21 French mainland regions. For a list: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regions_of_France

If you'll look at the summary of this Tour, It'll seem a Tour fit for pure tt'ers. There will be 3 TT's, for a total of more than 110km against the clock and only 1 MTF (even more so, only on a 2nd cat climb in the medium mountains), there will be no climbs above 2000m and only 1 above 1800m. Four high mountain stages isn't an exceedingly large amount (compared to this years Tour amount of 6 so called mountain stages). But the three or four (depends on your view) medium mountain stages and the tricky first week may turn the tables in favor of the climbers, if they dare to attack.

Anyway, let's start...

Tour Complet de France n°2, stage 1: Marseille - Marseille: 12km, TT (Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur)

This tour starts in Marseille, in the far southeast of France. The last couple of years there have been a few starts in this area (2009: Monaco and 2013: Corse), but more often than not the Tour starts in the north of France or even abroad. So, it's quite rare to see a Tour start in this corner of France.

The start of the stage will be held in front of the Nouveau Stade de Vélodrome, a more or less fitted location because of its name.



Then the course will head north by following the Avenue du Prado for a bit less than 2km. The Castellane roundabout is the first of some 90° corners through the 6th arondissement towards the coastline.
The quai de Rive Neuve, along the scenic Vieux Port (old harbour) of Marseille gives way to the Boulevard Charles Livon, proceeds in the Rue des Catalans, the Corniche Président JFK and finally the Promenade Georges Pompidou before the course takes a sharp left hand turn to the Avenue du Prado once again. The finish will also be in front of the Stade du Vélodrome.


Vieux Port Marseille


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Difficulty: **
 
Jun 30, 2014
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Re: Re:

togo95 said:
Mayomaniac said:
Stage 18 Chivasso - Jafferau; 162km
On the top of the climb we have 5km of false flat, then the technical descent will lead the rider into the Val di Susa. After 18km of false flat we have climb that starts in Meana di Susa just like Finestre, 10,7km at 8,3%, I dont know the name of the climb, but it would be another nice climb that you could use before Finestre.
It would, but I think the side you are descending would first need to be paved (or at least maintained a bit, it is in quite a bad state for road cycling).
Thanks, I didn't know that.
They could always use the Novalesa side of Moncenisio before Finestre, that would be a match made in heaven.
 
Tour de Suisse:

Stage 5: Meiringen - Thun, 183 km


The Tour de Suisse continues in the canton of Bern. The riders start from Meiringen and almost immdidately start the first climb of the day, to Brünigpass. This should give the opportunity to form an early breakaway. Due to the long flat sections between the climbs and because it's the day after the queen stage, the GC-favorites will probably take it fairly easy, giving breakaway riders a good chance for stage win.

After 30 km, the main difficulty of today's stage starts, the climb to Glaubenberg Pass. 14 km long and with an average slope of about 7 %. It could be used together with it's neighbour climb to the south, Glaubenbielen Pass, but this the we'll be a little more gentle, and use only Glaubenberg. After descending there is a flat section of about 30 km, before they start the next climb to Schallenberg, and then continue towards the stage finish in Thun.

But, instead of finishing now, the riders will have to do a loop around Thuner See. And before finishing in Thun, they will have to climb to Ringoldswild before the descent to the stage finish. From the top of the climb, there is only 11 km to the finish. The climb is moderately steep and long, but has sections of 9 and 10 % in the first 2-3 km. This will probably be the deciding point of the stage if there is a breakaway, and there is also a possibility for the favorites to attack each other and try to gain some seconds on the descent to Thun.

Climbs:
7 km: Brünigpass: 6,1 km, 6,7 %
43 km: Glaubenberg Pass: 14,4 km, 7,1 %
94 km: Schallenberg Pass: 4,5 km, 5,7 %
172 km: Ringoldswil: 7,5 km, 7,6 %

Map:



Profile:

 
Tour de Suisse

Stage 6: Bern - Bern: ITT, 28 km


It's time for the ITT of this version of TDS. A medium long time trial which gives the opportunity for the better time trialists of the GC favorites to gain time, but not so long that it's will be possible to loose 3-4-5 minutes. The route takes the riders east of Bern, and is fairly easy. The longest climb is less than 100 height meters, and the total number of height meters of the stage is less than 200.


Map:



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