Race Design Thread

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Feb 3, 2015
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My Tour de Pologne - stage 5

Wałbrzych - Bystrzyca Kłodzka 170km ****

MAP:


PROFILE:


CLIMBS:
Przełęcz Walimska - 9,6km at 4%
Przełęcz Jugowska - 13km at 4,1%
Przełęcz Jaworowa - 8,4km at 4,4%
Przełęcz Puchaczówka - 7,2km at 5,5%
Jedlnik - 4,4km at 7,1%
Jedlnik:


DESRIPTION:
There is no time for rest after yesterday's hell. Stage number 5 is not that hard itself, but could be selective enough if ridden hard. Riders who took last stage easy and lost minutes have planty of options to go breakaway. 12 kilometers at the beggining are very lumpy and then Przełęcz Walimska starts. It's not steep, but fairly long. After downhill they gonna take a right turn in Pieszyce to hit Przełęcz Walimska. 1th category climb first time on this stage. It's not steeper than Walimska, but longer. This climb's descent ends with 15 kilometers of very hilly part, which includes not categorized Srebrna Góra hill. Next kms are easier. Time to breathe and to prepere to what is still to come. An irregular Przełęcz Jaworowa and Puchaczówka with hard second part will take a lot of power out of cyclists. The crucial part of stage starts 20 kms to go. A reduced bunch will turn right next to train station in Domaszków. Conversly to climbs used before, Jedlink is shorter but more steep. Half km from the bottom gradient kicks up to 8% and starts to get worse finally reaching 15%. Second part is easier, but not easy. There are 17kms from the top. 3 of them are false flat, then downhill (first part technical, wheras second very fast). There is intermediate sprint 8,4 km to go, where you can steal 6 of seconds. I think it slightly increases the likelihood of solo actions. With 1 km to go there is small bump (something like 600m of 5,5%). It's hard to predict who has the best chance. Second tier riders, breakaway, or GC guys?

Wałbrzych:


Bystrzyca Kłodzka:


@fauniera
I love the fact you used Passo della Capella. Great climb! Want it in Giro again! :D
 
Re:

Libertine Seguros said:
Vršič is plenty hard enough for a short stage race, especially a 2.1 race where you'll get a mixed field. It'll be fine, you don't need Mangart in a five-day route. I love the scenery of Slovenia, I wish that there was more coverage of the Tour there.

I am just about there on a route for each GT. Do people want a Giro (my 2nd), a Tour (my 3rd) or a Vuelta (my 462856th)?

The latter two feature no major climbs I have previously used in any of my routes (well, there are a couple but they are different sides to those previously used). The Giro features one and one only, but I felt I could make an exception to my usual self-imposed rule. The Giro is a highly unusual route with some creative twists; the Tour perhaps even more so, an attempt at changing up the way the race formula works. The Vuelta is the best damned medium mountain race I ever made, combining keeping Javier Guillén happy with hardly any uphill finishes.

Oh, and I'm past the halfway point when it comes to librarying the thread. Things are starting to take shape, but it'll be a while yet before all is finished.
The Giro as there are to many tours on this forum. .....




He says about to start designing a Tour for after his next race.

Anyway stil the Giro. You've done too many vueltas.
 
Feb 3, 2015
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Gigs_98 said:
how can you make this cronoescalada profiles which look like giro profiles?
It's easy. When you create a route, you have " Tour Style / Vuelta Style / Giro Style / Retro Style " options above a map.
 
Jul 2, 2012
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Malaga - Gibraltar (217km)
After two stages, in which the final climb is the largest obstacle, we break from this convention on the ride from Malaga to Gibraltar. After a short and easy unclassified ascent , the first feature of the stage is the intermediate at Marbella. Afterwards the biggest climb of the day, Serrania de Ronda (21.6km@4.6%, cat2) is on the program. After the descent, interrupted by about 30km of lumpy up and down, the riders attempt the much shorter, but steeper climb to Encinas Borachas (4.2km@6.2%,cat3). The stage ends with a very steep hilltop finish at Gibraltar (3.9km@7.7%,cat3).

 
Jun 30, 2014
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Giro d' Italia

Stage 13 Tolmezzo-Bressanone/Brixen; 159,6km


Before the next 2 mountain stages we have an easier stage for the sprinters.
The 2 climbs of the day are Cima Sappada, 19,6km at 3,6% but very irregular and with a max. gradient of 15%, and Passo Monte Croce di Comelico, 11km at 3,8%. The 2nd half of the stage is pretty flatisch and goes through the Val Pusteria/Pustertal.
The stage finishes in Bressanone/Brixen, a nice small town.
This is the only stage for the sprinters that the 2nd week of my Giro will feature.
Bressanone/Brixen:
 
Re: Giro d' Italia

Mayomaniac said:
Stage 13 Tolmezzo-Bressanone/Brixen; 159,6km


Before the next 2 mountain stages we have an easier stage for the sprinters.
The 2 climbs of the day are Cima Sappada, 19,6km at 3,6% but very irregular and with a max. gradient of 15%, and Passo Monte Croce di Comelico, 11km at 3,8%. The 2nd half of the stage is pretty flatisch and goes through the Val Pusteria/Pustertal.
The stage finishes in Bressanone/Brixen, a nice small town.
This is the only stage for the sprinters that the 2nd week of my Giro will feature.
Bressanone/Brixen:
The place where this stage finishes, tells me that the next stage will be cruel :D
 
Jun 30, 2014
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Re: Giro d' Italia

Gigs_98 said:
Mayomaniac said:
Stage 13 Tolmezzo-Bressanone/Brixen; 159,6km


Before the next 2 mountain stages we have an easier stage for the sprinters.
The 2 climbs of the day are Cima Sappada, 19,6km at 3,6% but very irregular and with a max. gradient of 15%, and Passo Monte Croce di Comelico, 11km at 3,8%. The 2nd half of the stage is pretty flatisch and goes through the Val Pusteria/Pustertal.
The stage finishes in Bressanone/Brixen, a nice small town.
This is the only stage for the sprinters that the 2nd week of my Giro will feature.
Bressanone/Brixen:
The place where this stage finishes, tells me that the next stage will be cruel :D
We'll visit Austria, but it won't be the kind of stage that you expect. :D
 
Jun 30, 2014
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Stage 14 Bressanone/Brixen - Lienzer Dolomitenhütte; 158,7km


This is the first of 2 mountain stages that finish in Austria, the 2nd one is way longer and features multiple hard climbs back to back, so we would't see long range attacks on the stage before anyway, therefore we'll have an ungodly steep MTF.
The first 39km are pretty easy and feature some rolling terrain, then we have Passo Furcia/Furkelsattel, 12,5km at 6%, but you have over 1km of flat in the middle of the climb.
After the descent ends the next 10km are pretty easy, then we have Stallersattel/Passo Stalle 12km at 6,8%, followed by a long gentle descent and 14km of false flat, before we reach Lienz.
Here we have the short steep climb Prappernitze, 3,5km at 8,1% and after the descent we only have 3,8km of false flat, before the final climb starts, Lienzer Dolomitenhütte 7km at 13,6% with a parking lot on top of it that is steep enough to host a MTF.
We wont see action before Prappernitze, the favourites will try to softpedal the first 2 climbs and maybe let their team set a really high pace on Prappernitze before the final monster MTF.
The profile of the final climb:
http://www.climbbybike.com/de/profil.asp?Climbprofile=Dolomiten-H%FCtte&MountainID=1272
The view on top of the final climb:
 
Feb 3, 2015
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My Tour de Pologne - stage 6

Bielsko-Biała - Magurka Wilkowiecka 178km *****

MAP:


PROFILE:


CLIMBS:
Przełęcz Salmopolska (cat.1) - 10,0km at 4,3% (max. 9,9%)
Przełęcz Kubalonka (cat.2) - 7,4km at 4,3% (max. 15%)
Koniaków (cat.2) - 7,4km at 4,0% (max. 12,6%)
Przełęcz u Poloka (cat.3)- 7,5km at 3,0% (max 9,3%)
Czertnik (cat.2) - 1,6km at 10,3% (max. 19%)
Przełęcz Ślemieńska (cat.3) - 1,1km at 10,5% (max. 19,7%)
Przełęcz Rychwaldzka (cat.3) - 1,4km at 8,4% (max. 15%)
Kocierz (cat.2) - 3,0km at 7,2% (first kilometer of this climb is 14,4% averange!!! max. 19,3%)
Przełęcz Targanicka (cat.2) - 1,8km at 7,5% (last kilometer of this climb is 10% averange, max. 19%)
Przełęcz Przegibek (cat.2) - 6,4km at 5,1% (max. 11,9%)
Magurka Wilkowicka (cat.1) - 7,0km at 7,5% (last 4km at 10,7%!!!, max. 16,7%)


DESCRPTION:
This is the last road stage of Tour de Pologne. Those who still are in the mix and feel power in their legs definitely don't have a reason to complain. Yellow jearsey can't feel safe as there are 11 categorized climbs yet to come. Some of them are reasonably long, but fairly easy, whereas other are rather short but truely steep. The last one though, is one of the hardest climbs in Poland. The climb to Magurka is like 7km long, but the last 4km are all that really matters. After long day in a saddle, taking into account 10 climbs climbed on this very day, and more of them in previous days, this is gonna be a hell. Riders will be finishing alone. Will the best climber from Karpacz increase his lead, or lose time?
 
Lose time. Hard stages before will have probably taken its toll on him.

With just your TT to go it shows that the race at the moment is boring compared to what it can be.

No doubt the TT will have a twist in it rather than the boring current one.
 
Jun 30, 2014
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Stage 15 Lienz - Ried im Zillertal; 220,6km
part 1:

part2:

It's not very realistic to have a hard mountain stage that never touches Italian soil in the Giro, but I really wanted to use the full potential of the Zillertaler Höhensträße. :)
This time we use Prappernitze, 3,5km at 8,1%, as a nice warm-up, right after the start, so this should get a strong breakaway started.
After the descent we have 21,5km of rolling terrain and false flat before the first longer climb of the day starts, Felbertauern, 16,2km at 4,3% but 2,9km in the middle of the climb are just false flat and the 5,3km long Felbertauerntunnerl totally messes up the profile of the climb.
After the descent we have 22km of false flat, then the next climb Gerlospass, 8,5km at 6,8% with a max gradient of 17% starts.
On top of the climb you have 6km of false flat and the first half of the descent is alsmo more of a false flat but right after the steeper 2nd part of the descent ends the first climb of the Zillertaler Höhensträße starts in Zell am Ziller, 9,4km at 10,5%, the first real monster of the day. The following descent will bring the riders down to Ried im Zillertal and right after the descent the next monster climb already starts, Zirmstadel from Ried, 12,5km at 9,8%.
The following steep descent shouldn't be too hard, but after it you only have 7km of false flat before the most important climbb of the day starts, Melchboden from Hippach, 14,2km at 9,9% and after the other 2 brutal climbs this one will hurt like hell.
But the stage doesn't end on top of the climb, we have another steep descent and 3,5km at 10,7% right after it before the final descent will bring the riders to the finish line that is located in Ried im Zillertal.
I could have made the penultimate descent even longer, that would also make the final climb longer, 6km at 10%, but I think the shorter final climb should encourage the riders to attack on Melchboden, otherwise they could wait for the final climb.
This unglodly hard stage has the potential to create huge gaps and with the following restday the riders should use their chance and go all out on this stage.
 
Österreichrundfahrt is 2nd only to the Bayernrundfahrt in misuse of the available terrain :(

But seriously - Melchboden - Hochfügen back to back is just such a perfect combination that it's tragic we've never seen it.

Edit: and my 1st attempt at the Giro had a high mountain stage all in Slovenia. My 2nd attempt has the Grand Depart on foreign soil, but they're back on Italian soil by the time the major decisive stuff happens.
 
Jun 30, 2014
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Re:

Libertine Seguros said:
Österreichrundfahrt is 2nd only to the Bayernrundfahrt in misuse of the available terrain :(

But seriously - Melchboden - Hochfügen back to back is just such a perfect combination that it's tragic we've never seen it.

Edit: and my 1st attempt at the Giro had a high mountain stage all in Slovenia. My 2nd attempt has the Grand Depart on foreign soil, but they're back on Italian soil by the time the major decisive stuff happens.
I'm not using Hochfügen, after Melchboden the descent goes halfway down to Aschau im Zillertal and the short final climb (3,5km at 10,7%) is another road of the Zillertaler Höhenstraße, the climb ends when they reach the road that gos from Ried to Zirmstadel, then the final descent brings the riders down to Ried.
The final 40km:
 
Fantasy Tour de Suisse:
Stage 1: Prologue Zürich: 7,4 km


As announced, I've made a version of Tour de Suisse with a profile that uses somewhat more of the great climbs this country has to offer. Far too often, I've seen fairly easy versions of this race. It could possible be explained by the proximity the to the Tour de France on the race calendar, but still I've would have liked see some tougher stages. So I'll give it a try:

We start in Zürich with a 7,4 km long prologue in the western part of the city in the quarter of Höngg. Here they ride around ETH Zürich, perhaps the best technical university in Europe. The course is fairly easy without and steep or technical difficult sections.

Map:



Profile:

 
Stage 1: Zürich - Luzern 165 km

On the first ordinary stage, the riders start in Zürich and moves first north before they turn and heads west and then south towards Luzern. The stage is fairly easy without any categorized climbs, and should be one of the few chances for the sprinters in this version of Tour de Suisse.

Map:


Profile:

 
Stage 2: Luzern - Malbun, 192 km

First mountain stage, and only stage outside Switzerland with a MTF in Malbun, Liectenstein. The stage starts in Luzern and the riders heads east along the northern shore of the Vierwaldstättersee. When reaching the southeasternmost point of the lake by the village of Altdorf, the riders turn east and start the climb to Klausenpass. The climb is long, almost 25 km, and the last 11 km has an average slope of almost 8 %. After the descent to Linhtal, the riders are about halfway on the stage.

The riders continue north and then east over Kerenzerberg and along Walensee before crossing the border to Liechenstein. Here they start the final climb of the day to Malbun from the village of Triesenberg. The last climb is long and tough, except for a 1 km long section in middle of the climb, the inclination is 8 % or more the whole climb and the second last km is 11 %. Expect a first real showdown between the GC favorites.

Climbs:
78 km Klausenpass: 24,6 km, 6,1 %
130 km: Kerenzerberg: 5,9 km, 4,8 %
192 km Malbun: 14,4 km, 8,6 %

Map:


Profile:

 
Stage 3: St.Gallen - Rüti, 185 km

Stage 3 is a typical hilly stage with several shorter and steep climbs the last 80 km. From St.Gallen the riders will almost from the start face an uncategorized climb of 6 km and 4 %. After descending they continue west towards Winterthur in a fairly flat terrain. Just before reaching Winterthur the riders turn southeast into the hilly terrain east of Zürich.

Here they will have to climb 6 categorized climbs in 70 km, the last 3 climbs are just 23, 15 and 10 km before the stage finish in Rüti respectively. This will give aggressive puncheurs a good chance for a stage win. Especially the climb to Schufelberg with 15 km to go has some really steep sections of 11 and 12 %.

Climbs:

102 km: Girenbad: 3,5 km, 6,3 %
126 km: Schmidrüti: 3,5 km, 6,4 %
139 km: Sternenberg: 3,3 km, 7,4 %
162 km: Ghöch (Bäretswil): 4,5 km, 5 %
170 km: Schufelberg: 2,4 km, 8,6 %
175 km: Bachtel, 2,2 km, 7 %

Map:



Profile:

 
Stage 4: Altdorf - Andermatt, 178 km

The small village of Andermatt in the canton of Uri is probably the best area if one wants tough climbs in Switzerland. Andermatt is surrounded in all directions of steep climbs which should make it a focal point for a cycling tour like Tour de Suisse. Strangely these climbs haven't been used in way making them a deciding point in a stage i TDS since the MTF on Grimselpass in 2007. Since then none of the climbs surrounding Andermatt have been used close to a stage finish. This is certainly a shame!

The riders start in Altdorf and head south towards Wassen. From this point it's only up and down the last 160 km of the stage. There is barely a km of flat sections after km 20 on the stage. The riders start from Wassen with Sustenpass. 17 kms of climbling with at a average slope of over 7,5 %. After descending to Innterkirchen, the next climb to Grimselpass starts almost immediately. This is the longest climb of this version of TDS. 26 km and a total of over 1500 height meters. After the descent to Ulrichen, the riders will have to face the steepest of todays climbs, Nufenenpass, which is also the highest point of this version of TDS.

And, of course, the best is saved for last. The last climb of the day is St.Gotthardpass. With 12,5 km and 7,3 % it may look as the easiest climb on the stage, but most of the climb is COBBLED. A unique climb which was last used in TDS in 2001. Therefore it's certainly about time to re-use this marvel of a climb. With over 4000 height meters previously on the stage, this could a spectacular last climb. At the top the riders will turn to the new road for the descent and the last 12-13 km to Andermatt.

43 km: Sustenpass: 17,4 km, 7,5 %
97 km: Grimselpass: 26 km, 5,9 %
128 km: Nufenenpass: 13,3 km, 8,5 %
164 km: St.Gotthard pass: 12,7 km, 7,3 %

Map:



Profile:

 
Had this one in mind for a little while, with I think lots of different possibilities to join up the Celtic nations, but this is a first go at The Celtic Tour - y Taith Celtaidd

For this edition we'll run south to north, and take in an unusual prologue in Cornwall at the Eden Project - it's only 2.5km long, mainly uphill out of the former clay pit. The prologue will be on the Friday evening, since the route can be easily and atmospherically lit up, and should be able to pass indoors through the visitors' centre part way up out of the pit (the crescent shape at top-right of the photo) for a unique and dramatic start to a week long tour.




 
y Taith Celtaidd, Stage 1
Unfortunately Cornwall is somewhat isolated from its Celtic neighbours (not by as far as Bretagne/Breizh of course, that's too much of a transfer for a one week race) so we head north from St Austell via the English counties of Devon and Somerset to an uphill finish on the Porlock toll road after a roller coaster finale. We start with some opportunities for helicopter shots of the gorgeous Cornish coastline before heading inland for a relatively flat ride up to Exmoor where things get quite lumpy. At 45km to go the climbing starts in earnest as we head into the national park, there's nothing massive but the classics guys will be able to get stuck in with some sharp climbs and exposed moorland. The final 30km is dominated by fast technical descents to the coast preceding hard kicks back up to the cliff top level - first at Lynmouth, then most spectacularly at Porlock where the A39 is supposedly the steepest main road in England. We're going down, followed by a sharp left turn at the village hall at the bottom to start the toll road climb to the finish. It's quite long at 6.6km but only 5% so gives a chance for people to close back up if they've got their positioning wrong on the mad dash down to the bottom, but also a tiring breakaway can stay away here after taking a chance over Exmoor. Quite a long one at 195km.



Carlyon Bay, St Austell


Porlock, the junction from the steep way down to the steady way to the finish


Porlock bay:
 
y Taith Celtaidd, Stage 2

The race makes a short transfer from Porlock to Bristol for the night, before a 167km straight line across the heart of Wales to Tregaron - the final 30km along the Abergwesyn Drovers' Trail, some of the most spectacularly isolated roads in the British Isles. The opening sections are straight forward, punctuated by iconic bridges - first Brunel's Clifton Suspension Bridge, and then the first Severn motorway crossing providing big nervous moments because of guaranteed winds. From there the terrain gets gradually lumpier heading into mid Wales, although we cross the Brecon Beacons on low level back roads in the shadows of the highest peaks of southern Britain. The bumpy roads start as we cross the Eppynt ranges, a huge upland playground for the UK military, and then make a tricky dive down to Beulah and Wales's Porte de l'Enfer - what follows is a brutal upland of narrow, twisty roads going over fords and bad road surfaces, constantly up and down, and taking in at least three 'proper' climbs - one of which the Devil's Staircase is notorious for grades of 30% where riders in the old Milk Race tour of Britain were reduced to walking. It's only 1km long and the final few hundred metres are much easier, but come with the right gear selection. After that and a similarly stupidly steep (but dead straight) descent, the next kick up isn't much easier and then we're into 7km of unrelenting up and down across completely exposed high moorland - it's good for a lone rider because the chase has no chance of getting organised even if there's any big groups left at this point, but when the weather is bad it's really BAAARD. Oh yeah, watch out for the sheep obv. Finally we finish with a long descent off the mountain down to the little drovers' village of Tregaron, some of whose outlying hamlets have only been connected to the mains electricity in the last couple of years. The descent is sweeping and fast at the top, with a couple of kicks up nearer the bottom - a classics guy that's been brave up on the mountain road gets a good chance to hang on as he won't be visible by the chase; he'll come through the little village square, over the river Brennig and a very easy kick up to finish by the primary school. Transfer to nearby Aberystwyth for overnight accommodation.



Clifton Suspension Bridge, Bristol:


First Severn motorway crossing


The Brecon Beacons


The Devil's Staircase


The Abergwesyn Drovers' Trail mountain road
 

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