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Race Design Thread

Page 6 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
While we wait to see what Bavarianrider has waiting for us in week 3, I shall start another event, this time a bit further off the beaten track.

This is a one-week stage race which takes in wildly varying climate and altitude, and which will offer some variety to allow almost any rider to have something to fight for in the race, as well as fulfilling Pat McQuaid's aims of globalising and filling his pockets, although it may simultaneously alienate some of those money-rich markets I guess.

Tour of Israel

Stage 1: Eilat - Ein Gedi (Kibbutz), 230km

11j64wh.png


We start off with our longest stage (by quite some way), starting by the shores of the Red Sea and travelling almost directly to Ein Gedi, which results in a slow and gradual drag up to nearly 300m of altitude, before we start to ride at a continual slow downhill for the next 100km, before we arrive at the Dead Sea Highway, the lowest road in the world, some 400m below sea level.

11buik3.png


Climbs:
Ein Gedi (Botanical Garden)(cat.3) 1,5km @ 7,4%

The extreme heat could become a major factor, of course, as could the Milan-San Remo style issue of there being practically no respite, just continually heading in the same direction with very few turns. However, there is a sting in the tail; after 228,5km of riding on more or less consistent gradients, and after 50 more or less pan-flat kilometres at about -390m, the final 1,5km from the shore of the Dead Sea up to the Kibbutz at Ein Gedi are uphill at an average of 7,4% and with a brief steepest patch at 15%. As a result, the puncheurs will consider this to be one for them, though if the rouleurs or a sprinter who is capable on a slight uphill like a Freire or a Rojas has the tempo set very high, especially on such a long, flat stage, they may have a bit more left in the tank for such a finish.

This is the only categorised climb of the day, so whoever takes the victory will acquire all three major jerseys.

Eilat, home of the Grand Départ:
Eilat-pic.jpg


Ein Gedi, stage finish, with the road up to the kibbutz visible on the right:
PikiWiki_Israel_2182_Kibbutz_Ein-Gedi_from_above_%D7%AA%D7%A6%D7%A4%D7%99%D7%AA_%D7%9E%D7%94%D7%A8_%D7%A6%D7%A8%D7%95%D7%99%D7%94_%D7%9C%D7%A2%D7%99%D7%9F-%D7%92%D7%93%D7%99.jpg
 
Libertine Seguros said:
While we wait to see what Bavarianrider has waiting for us in week 3, I shall start another event, this time a bit further off the beaten track.

This is a one-week stage race which takes in wildly varying climate and altitude, and which will offer some variety to allow almost any rider to have something to fight for in the race, as well as fulfilling Pat McQuaid's aims of globalising and filling his pockets, although it may simultaneously alienate some of those money-rich markets I guess.

Tour of Israel

Stage 1: Eilat - Ein Gedi (Kibbutz), 230km

11j64wh.png


We start off with our longest stage (by quite some way), starting by the shores of the Red Sea and travelling almost directly to Ein Gedi, which results in a slow and gradual drag up to nearly 300m of altitude, before we start to ride at a continual slow downhill for the next 100km, before we arrive at the Dead Sea Highway, the lowest road in the world, some 400m below sea level.

11buik3.png


Climbs:
Ein Gedi (Botanical Garden)(cat.3) 1,5km @ 7,4%

The extreme heat could become a major factor, of course, as could the Milan-San Remo style issue of there being practically no respite, just continually heading in the same direction with very few turns. However, there is a sting in the tail; after 228,5km of riding on more or less consistent gradients, and after 50 more or less pan-flat kilometres at about -390m, the final 1,5km from the shore of the Dead Sea up to the Kibbutz at Ein Gedi are uphill at an average of 7,4% and with a brief steepest patch at 15%. As a result, the puncheurs will consider this to be one for them, though if the rouleurs or a sprinter who is capable on a slight uphill like a Freire or a Rojas has the tempo set very high, especially on such a long, flat stage, they may have a bit more left in the tank for such a finish.

This is the only categorised climb of the day, so whoever takes the victory will acquire all three major jerseys.

Eilat, home of the Grand Départ:
Eilat-pic.jpg


Ein Gedi, stage finish, with the road up to the kibbutz visible on the right:
PikiWiki_Israel_2182_Kibbutz_Ein-Gedi_from_above_%D7%AA%D7%A6%D7%A4%D7%99%D7%AA_%D7%9E%D7%94%D7%A8_%D7%A6%D7%A8%D7%95%D7%99%D7%94_%D7%9C%D7%A2%D7%99%D7%9F-%D7%92%D7%93%D7%99.jpg

Wow, that's unique. Nice idea!!!
You'll probably have to wait till i finish mine. Right know i am considering some changes to the stages i already did.
 
After a transfer back past the Dead Sea Hotels and up to sea level and beyond, we're ready for the next stage.

Stage 2: Be'er Sheva - Ashkelon, 165km

2iw7f2a.png


Starting in the site of the southernmost Israelite settlement in the Bible, on the edge of the Negev desert, the péloton will head northward for a couple of small categorised climbs, before the run-in to the Mediterranean coast, finishing with three laps of a 17km circuit around Ashkelon, where a few twists and turns shouldn't be enough to prevent the sprinters from having their day in the sun. The final sprint takes place over a gradual right hand turn, so positioning could be vital.

2dbw5mw.png


Climbs:
Ya'ar Lahav (Blade Forest)(cat.3) 3,0km @ 4,0%
Ya'ar Ha-Malachim (Angels' Forest)(cat.3) 1,4km @ 5,0%
Beit Guvrin (cat.3) 0,5km @ 8,5%

Our start town of Be'er Sheva:
34e3d7ba56a2de6e45a7b3c1a42ad2b2.jpg


Mediterranean finish at Ashkelon:
800pxashkelonskyline.jpg
 
After the nice flat finish for the sprinters yesterday, the fast men will get another chance to shine.

Stage 3: Ashkelon - Tel Aviv, 152km

219b0jq.png


Mixed blessings for the péloton today; staying close to the Mediterranean coast means the possibility of a sea breeze to cool them down, but if that breeze is too weak then the low altitude will make it a scorcher; if that breeze is too strong, then there's the possibility for echelon action. This stage is completely and utterly flat, featuring no categorised climbs.

34qqxw8.png


The route to Tel Aviv is pretty short, so once they get to the city there are seven laps of a 9,8km circuit that runs up and down the seafront, from Tel-Aviv Marina to the old city of Jaffa (Yafo), giving us a very dramatic mixture of the old and the new as the riders subject themselves to potential crosswinds, and give Pat McQuaid something to smile about as he gets a very affluent and attractive setting for his beloved sprint.

The old city of Jaffa at the southern end of the circuit:
ancient-jaffa-big.jpg


The northern end of the circuit:
TelAvivbeach.jpg


Now that the sprinters have had their fun here in Israel, it's time to move up further north and heat up the battle for the General Classification...
 
After a short trip to the northeast of Tel Aviv-Yafo, it's time for the week's test against the clock, ahead of the more mountainous stages to come.

Stage 4: Kfar Saba - Kfar Saba (ITT), 24km

119zcxc.png


Starting in one of the city's parks, this 24km test against the clock runs through some relatively barren plains to the north of the town and is once more very flat. It is a pure power time triallist's course as well, with little in the way of technical tests to take the balance of power away from the strongmen.

2pshlsn.png


The selection of Kfar Saba as the host for the time trial carries some positives and some negatives; it allows a course of reasonable length to be set up with the minimum of disruption and is well-placed transfer-wise; however security costs may be high as the town lies close to the Green Line; the Palestinian city of Qalqiya is separated from the area surrounding Kfar Saba by a wall, although activity in the area has been minimal of late.

kfar-saba.jpg
 
Right, now a little taster for the final weekend, with a short stage that gives the climbers their first real taste of the action (save for the final kilometre in Ein Gedi).

Stage 5: Netanya - Haifa, 138km

20rsb38.png


Starting from the very modern city of Netanya, the stage heads inland before turning back to the northwest, and running parallel to the northern face of Mount Carmel. We climb this first from Nesher, before descending into the industrial and port city of Haifa, known as the workshop of Israel. After that it's three laps to finish, going over Mount Carmel North, from Kiryat Rabin.

2rmy5hc.png


Climbs:
Mount Carmel (Nesher)(cat.2), 7,6km @ 6,0%
Mount Carmel (Kiryat Rabin)(cat.3), 2,6km @ 6,6%
Mount Carmel (Kiryat Rabin)(cat.3), 2,6km @ 6,6%
Mount Carmel (Kiryat Rabin)(cat.3), 2,6km @ 6,6%

This is the first chance for the climbers to make a big difference on the GC, while the final circuit's climb is not too long for the more lightweight puncheurs, especially given that there's 6km of flat after the finish of the final descent before we reach the line. Even some of the more mountain-adept sprinters may feel like they have a chance here given that the stage is so short, but realistically we can expect a very reduced bunch duking it out, whether that be an attack group or a péloton shrunk to the bare essentials.

Netanya:
view-of-netanya.jpg


Haifa (view from atop Mount Carmel North - finish will be down in the city on the right hand side):
276997400_0d57d815f8_z.jpg
 
May 6, 2009
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Bavarianrider said:
Stage 14


Mountain TT Oberstdorf- Nebelhorn 7,8km

If riders thought that yesterdays climb was steep, they will expierence a nice little suprise today.
It's a very short mountain TT but it's a super dooper steep one. 7,8km with 14% average. Many sections above 20%. Including a 500m piece with 24% average
A pure climber is likely to win this one. But how will TT guys do?
What gears will riders use?? They better put some extra gears on the bikes.
In any case it's going to be a spectacle for the fans!

Nebelhorn-Oberstdorf-profile.jpg


Talking about steepness:D
DieSteigungderletzten2,5km.jpg

Hahahaha, WTF?
 
Jun 16, 2009
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Has the Nebelhorn ever been used in a race? I think the best climbers in the world would struggle to get up that ramp in that picture above let alone the rest of the climb. That must be like 40%!!!! :eek:
 
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If you had to take the inside corner, then yes it is rather steep, but if you take the outside corner then it isn't so steep, and I think it is more the camera angle with the camera being tilted up. Bad for everybody other than Rujano and Purito.
 
auscyclefan94 said:
Has the Nebelhorn ever been used in a race? I think the best climbers in the world would struggle to get up that ramp in that picture above let alone the rest of the climb. That must be like 40%!!!! :eek:

Well if there are hobby riders who made it to the top, i think pros should be able to do it. However, i decided to skip the Nebelhorn TT. There are already two super steep mountain finishes with the Kitzbühler Horn and Kehlstein. So there's actually not any need for this TT. I will replace with an ordinary stage.
 
Libertine Seguros said:
Right, now a little taster for the final weekend, with a short stage that gives the climbers their first real taste of the action (save for the final kilometre in Ein Gedi).

Stage 5: Netanya - Haifa, 138km

20rsb38.png


Starting from the very modern city of Netanya, the stage heads inland before turning back to the northwest, and running parallel to the northern face of Mount Carmel. We climb this first from Nesher, before descending into the industrial and port city of Haifa, known as the workshop of Israel. After that it's three laps to finish, going over Mount Carmel North, from Kiryat Rabin.

2rmy5hc.png


Climbs:
Mount Carmel (Nesher)(cat.2), 7,6km @ 6,0%
Mount Carmel (Kiryat Rabin)(cat.3), 2,6km @ 6,6%
Mount Carmel (Kiryat Rabin)(cat.3), 2,6km @ 6,6%
Mount Carmel (Kiryat Rabin)(cat.3), 2,6km @ 6,6%

This is the first chance for the climbers to make a big difference on the GC, while the final circuit's climb is not too long for the more lightweight puncheurs, especially given that there's 6km of flat after the finish of the final descent before we reach the line. Even some of the more mountain-adept sprinters may feel like they have a chance here given that the stage is so short, but realistically we can expect a very reduced bunch duking it out, whether that be an attack group or a péloton shrunk to the bare essentials.

Netanya:
view-of-netanya.jpg


Haifa (view from atop Mount Carmel North - finish will be down in the city on the right hand side):
276997400_0d57d815f8_z.jpg

I really like thats stage srace
 
After the tasty hors d'oeuvres in Haifa, it's time to bring the GC fighters to the fore. And with the ITT mileage done, this means it's time to climb.

Stage 6: Haifa (Neve Yosef) - Beit Jann, 143km

347icl1.png


This is another relatively short stage, heading inland and looping into and out of the Beit Ha-Kerem valley, with a number of categorised climbs, finishing in the highest altitude town in Israel, the Druze settlement of Beit Jann.

s2cra9.png


Climbs:
Ha-Shabi Mountain (cat.2) 9,9km @ 3,3%
Kishor (Karmiel)(cat.1) 8,6km @ 5,1%
Tefen (cat.3) 3,7km @ 4,4%
Kishor (Abu Snan)(cat.2) 9,2km @ 4,7%
Beit Jann (cat.1) 11,3km @ 6,0%

The first real test for the riders is the climb to the Kishor kibbutz from Karmiel, through Biane and Deir al'Asad. Though the average gradient is a meagre 5,1%, it actually includes a period of descent and the climb actually reaches up to 20% at points. After that it's a long, lazy loop down before climbing the same climb from the slightly easier Abu Snan side. From there we descend to Nahf, ready to start the final climb of the day.

At 11,3km, Beit Jann is definitely enough for the climbers to give this a go. It maxes out at 11%, however, so a strong climbing ITT rider will feel that they can definitely limit their losses.

The Kishor climb:
ir0yux.png


Beit Jann:
3459747740_2ecaf65626.jpg


Tomorrow we'll give the GC men a last chance to duke it out, with the toughest stage of the race.
 
Libertine Seguros said:
After the tasty hors d'oeuvres in Haifa, it's time to bring the GC fighters to the fore. And with the ITT mileage done, this means it's time to climb.

Stage 6: Haifa (Neve Yosef) - Beit Jann, 143km

347icl1.png


This is another relatively short stage, heading inland and looping into and out of the Beit Ha-Kerem valley, with a number of categorised climbs, finishing in the highest altitude town in Israel, the Druze settlement of Beit Jann.

s2cra9.png


Climbs:
Ha-Shabi Mountain (cat.2) 9,9km @ 3,3%
Kishor (Karmiel)(cat.1) 8,6km @ 5,1%
Tefen (cat.3) 3,7km @ 4,4%
Kishor (Abu Snan)(cat.2) 9,2km @ 4,7%
Beit Jann (cat.1) 11,3km @ 6,0%

The first real test for the riders is the climb to the Kishor kibbutz from Karmiel, through Biane and Deir al'Asad. Though the average gradient is a meagre 5,1%, it actually includes a period of descent and the climb actually reaches up to 20% at points. After that it's a long, lazy loop down before climbing the same climb from the slightly easier Abu Snan side. From there we descend to Nahf, ready to start the final climb of the day.

At 11,3km, Beit Jann is definitely enough for the climbers to give this a go. It maxes out at 11%, however, so a strong climbing ITT rider will feel that they can definitely limit their losses.

The Kishor climb:
ir0yux.png


Beit Jann:
3459747740_2ecaf65626.jpg


Tomorrow we'll give the GC men a last chance to duke it out, with the toughest stage of the race.

Which time of the year do you suggest for this one? How are temperatures?
 
Stage 18

Frankfurt---Winterberg 235km

Stage 18 takes the riders on a long hilly ride through the Taunus and the Sauerland. While there are no big climbs, it's a typical german medium mountain Terrain. And after 200km and the hard last days, those last 200-300m climbs will hurt the riders. Those who have the freshest legs will certainly be able to make up some good seconds in the GC.

scaled.php


scaled.php


Ort_winterberg_sauerland_10015669_.jpg
 
Too many mountainous stage races, here.

Another side of the story: modification of a cobbled semi-classic.

Dwars door Vlaanderen
to become À travers la Belgique again (like it used to be until 1999)

With the following route:

Part 1: Anderlues to Estinnes-au-Mont (122.837km)

Some 17 cobbled sections on this part:

ANDERLUES 0,014 168
PAVES-DE-MONT-SAINTE-GENEVIEVE 7,101 201
VELLEREILLE-LES-BRAYEUX 14,097 160
HAULCHIN 21,15 116
PAVES-DE-GIVRY 28,462 77
PAVES-DE-QUEVY-LE-GRAND 35,228 123
BOIS-DE-LA-LANIERE 42,115 158
HON-HERGIES 49,481 125
PAVES-DU-CORON 56,156 146
PAVES-DE-BLAUGIES 63,321 144
BLAREGNIES 70,269 141
GENLY 77,255 110
ASQUILLIES 84,438 78
NOUVELLES 91,356 50
PAVES-DE-SAINT-SYMPHORIEN 98,502 56
PAVES-DE-VILLERS-SAINT-GHISLAIN 105,553 98
ESTINNES-AU-MONT 112,837 87

http://www.cyclogaetan.be/2008/avril2008/pavedupresidet.htm

The section of Givry is 4km, I think.

The section of Blaugies is a killer and no stranger to pro cycling since it was one of the main sections of Paris-Brussels until the mid-eighties, id est when the latter was still a major classic.

The section of Blaregnies or Sars-la-Bruyère, also known as the Pavé des bois is the hardest of 'em all.

sarslbruyere.jpg


This is Hon-Hergies (in France): http://www.crazybikers.be/Images/photos/paves/7.jpg

The Bois de la Lanière (around Goegnies, France):

6.jpg


Part II: Estinnes-au-Mont - Frasnes-Les-Anvaing/Saint-Sauveur (58.1km)

Leisurely transition towards the Flemish Ardennes:

http://img856.imageshack.us/img856/3871/frasnes.png

In this part the riders will have to cross the Bourliquet, one of the main sealed climb in the Tournaisis, which is no longer used in pro cycling today but one of the main climbs of the Tryptique Monts-et-Chateaux on the U23 circuit (I have to say that the 5 image/post rule is annoying me).

http://www.cyclogaetan.be/routeremarquables/cotes/COTESHAINAUT/bourliquet.htm

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bourliquet


http://www.climbbybike.com/fr/ascension.asp?qryMountainID=785


Part III: Saint-Sauveur-Waregem (96km)

Saint-Sauveur is below one of the hardest paved climbs (along with the Koppenberg) in Belgium, the Côte des Hauts or Côte du Beau site (Southwest side):

62Hauts.jpg


http://www.climbbybike.com/fr/ascension.asp?col=Beau-Site-Sud-Ouest&qryMountainID=137

1.2km, 7% average, 17% maximum and not descent right after the climb, which makes it hard for recup. It's also a part of the Tryptich and did belong to Dwars door België in 1999.

So you have the last part on this old course from 1999 (but with only one passage on the finish line): http://autobus.cyclingnews.com/results/1999/mar99/dwars99.html

It's of course a classic from the Flemish Ardennes but we can remove one or two climbs to cut down kms because 277km is a bit long for a semi-classic. But this, dear friends, should really be a killer of a race !!
 
Bavarianrider said:
Which time of the year do you suggest for this one? How are temperatures?

Difficult to say as it varies so much. In Eilat, for example. we'll be risking 40º+ days any time from April to October. The climate in Beit Jann, by contrast, is relatively cool thanks to the altitude.

Certainly probably somewhere around late March would probably be best, or just after the Ardennes, and if not then, then we'd have to wait until late September, possibly first week of October (putting it against Beijing). It's not going to be an easy one to shoehorn into the calendar.

Echoes said:
The section of Blaregnies or Sars-la-Bruyère, also known as the Pavé de bois is the hardest of 'em all.

That looks seriously nasty. That looks like no fun to ride at all!
 
After transferring south from Beit Jann, it's time for us to bring our week in Israel to a conclusion. And what better way to finish off than by giving the riders their toughest test of the week and ensure that the GC battle lives until the end?

Stage 7: Nazareth - Ski Station Mount Hermon, 184km

e0l4p3.png


The altitude here varies wildly. We start at 200m, in one of the most storied Biblical cities, and descend to more than 200m below sea level as the péloton circles the Lake of Galilee, before a long, drawn out climb to Ramat Razim, before the final battle to Israel's only ski centre, on the slopes of the storied Mount Hermon.

ou2tmu.png


Climbs:
Mount Tabor (cat.3) 2,3km @ 5,2%
Kafr Kama (cat.3) 7,1km @ 2,3%
Ramat Razim (cat.1) 23,3km @ 4,3%
Dalton (cat.3) 3,8km @ 4,0%
Mount Hermon (HC) 27,2km @ 5,6%

Naturally, we're not climbing all of Mount Tabor; the road up to the Church of Transfiguration would make a very good short, steep mountaintop finish, but we have bigger fish to fry. In comparison to yesterday's punishing early climb, today it's more about accumulation than brutality; the finishing climb is not as steep, but is nearly twice as long, and very exposed in places. This will be the final battle for the GC. Will the time triallists be able to grind their way up on the back wheel of the climbers? Will the length of the climb give the pure climbers the time to break the all-rounders? Will the extreme altitude variation have any effect?

Nazareth:
nazareth1s.jpg


Ski Station Mount Hermon (summer):
1978421200911885624.jpg
 
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Libertine Seguros said:
After the tasty hors d'oeuvres in Haifa, it's time to bring the GC fighters to the fore. And with the ITT mileage done, this means it's time to climb.

Stage 6: Haifa (Neve Yosef) - Beit Jann, 143km

347icl1.png


This is another relatively short stage, heading inland and looping into and out of the Beit Ha-Kerem valley, with a number of categorised climbs, finishing in the highest altitude town in Israel, the Druze settlement of Beit Jann.

s2cra9.png


Climbs:
Ha-Shabi Mountain (cat.2) 9,9km @ 3,3%
Kishor (Karmiel)(cat.1) 8,6km @ 5,1%
Tefen (cat.3) 3,7km @ 4,4%
Kishor (Abu Snan)(cat.2) 9,2km @ 4,7%
Beit Jann (cat.1) 11,3km @ 6,0%

The first real test for the riders is the climb to the Kishor kibbutz from Karmiel, through Biane and Deir al'Asad. Though the average gradient is a meagre 5,1%, it actually includes a period of descent and the climb actually reaches up to 20% at points. After that it's a long, lazy loop down before climbing the same climb from the slightly easier Abu Snan side. From there we descend to Nahf, ready to start the final climb of the day.

At 11,3km, Beit Jann is definitely enough for the climbers to give this a go. It maxes out at 11%, however, so a strong climbing ITT rider will feel that they can definitely limit their losses.

The Kishor climb:
ir0yux.png


Beit Jann:
3459747740_2ecaf65626.jpg


Tomorrow we'll give the GC men a last chance to duke it out, with the toughest stage of the race.

Beit Jann looks a killer. Israel really does have some nice areas to ride and race in.
 
Stage 19

Hameln-Bispingen ca 195km

We are back in the north of germany, but this time it won't be as easy as some 2 weeks ago. In the final 70km of the stage we are racing through the Lüneburgr Heide. Not only a beautiful landscape, but also a thin climbers nightmare, cause the area as lots of good old small cobled streets. Of course we try to use as many of them as we can. It's not easy to say how many cobled km we can exactly include, but 20+km shouldn be much of a problemat all in the final 50-60km of this stage.
So this stage certainly has the potential to turn the GC upside down. Climbers will suffer. Will the rolleurs will try everything to win back some time.
Let the race through the northern hell of Germany beginn!

unbenannt1gu.jpg


10_bdfeaa766a0f1fa43e07f28c3ee5b274.jpg


1253874_web.jpg


Bild_1_6.JPG
 

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