Race Design Thread

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As promised, a Tour if it was taken over by Unipublic

Parody alert ;)

Rouen Rouen (TTT)
Rouen Dieppe
Dieppe Cassel*
Lille Charleville-Mezieres
Charleville-Mezieres Thionville
Thionville Strasbourg
Strasbourg Gerardmer (La Mauselaine)*
Selestat Planche des Belles Filles*
Belfort Longres*
Dijon Moulins
La Chartre Saint-Armand-Montrond (ITT)
Montlucon Super Besse*
Brive-la-Gaillarde Agen
Mont-de-Marsan Laberouat*
Pau Le Mourtis (Col de Mente)*
Toulouse Montpelier
Orange Grenoble (La Bastille)*
Grenoble Villefranche-sur-Saone
Bourg-en-Bresse Col de la Savoliere (Col de la Ramaz-Le Praz-de-Lys)*
Cluses La Ruchere*
Paris

*uphill finish

ok, not quite Unipublic as I just about managed to fit inside 3500kms

Profiles later
 
Progsprach said:
PS: I'm currently working on a huge project, that's why I haven't posted in a while. If everything goes right, I'll have it finished in a week or two (it's massive :D)
What is it? The silk route by bike? 85 stages between Istanbul and Xi'an, crossing Turkey, Iran, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and China?


btw, I have been thinking about it, but it's too huge. :D
 
I still had to finish my giro. So, here's the third week.

15th stage: Pavia -Vicenza, 227 km

A long, flat stage in the plain of the river Po. Expect one of the few mass sprints of the race.

16th stage: Bassano del Grappa - Alpe di Pampeago, 191km



The first stage in the Dolomites, with five categorised climbs:
Monte Grappa: 17.8km @ 8.5%, hors category
Passo di Gobbera: 3rd category
Passo di Brocon: 1st category
Passo Manghen: hors category
Alpe di Pampeago: 1st category (or hors category??)

17th stage: Bolzano - Bolzano, 46 km



A time trial around Bolzano, on both sides of the Adige river. The first half is pan-flat, the second half hilly.

18th stage: Merano - Aprica, 182km



One but last mountain stage, with the mythical Stelvio, the Mortirolo and the Monte Padrio, all three well-deserved hors category.

19th stage: Edolo - Gerola Alta, 195km

Final mountain stage and final decisive stage of this giro.



This one has five categorised climbs:
Passo del Vivione, 1st category
Passo di Presolana, 2nd category
Colle di Zambla Alta, 2nd category
Passo San Marco, hors category
Gerola Alta, 16.6km @ 5.8%, 1225m, 2nd category

20th stage: Lecco - Milano, 105km

A run-in of 55km and 10 laps of 5km in the historical center of Milano.


So, that's it.
From a hindsight, I would have changed one of the hilltop finishes of the first week into a flat finish to make it a bit easier.
 
Next one is a bit less elaborate: an idea for a Belgian or world chamionship course (only the circuit part of it).
It probably is the hardest piece of cycling belgium has on offer: a lap of 21.1 km around Stavelot which includes the côte de Stockeu (2.3km @ 9.9%), côte de Wanneranval (1.8km @ 9.1%) and Thier de Coo (2.6km @ 8.6%).



Finish can be in front of the abbey.



Maybe the run-in to the circuit can start from Liege, and the time trials can be hold on and around the F1 race circuit of Francorchamps.
 
roundabout said:
Profiles later
Ok, lot of links ahead

Stage 3. Dieppe-Cassel

http://tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/109439

Not sure what happened with the last climb, but it should be this

http://jmpodvin2000.free.fr/denivellephoto/cotenord/salite locali/casselimage/CasselAire.png

Not quite to the top, only til the end of the steep bit. Last 300 meters at 14%

Stage 7. Strasbourg-Gerardmer (La Mauselaine)

tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/109450

Basically a shameless copy of the 2009 Tour de l'Avenir final.

I am assuming that this is the partial profile where the initial steep bit is included

https://sites.google.com/site/velovosgescols/chaume-francis (until km 1.5 or maybe slightly further)

Stage 8. Selestat-Planche des Belles Filles

http://tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/109452

Obviously a familiar finish. Platzerwasel, 2 smaller Ballons and Hundsrück before

Stage 9. Belfort-Longres

http://tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/109454

A bit of a Barcelona-like stage to the fortified city

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Langres

Stage 12. Montlucon-Super Besse

http://tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/110071

The usual finish
Stage 14. Mont-de-Marsan-Laberouat

http://tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/110060

Col de Labays and the finish at the refuge

http://www.altimetrias.net/Francia/Pirineos/Laberouat.gif

Stage 15. Pau-Le Mourtis

http://tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/110058

High mountains with Bales, Portillon and the finish on the difficult side of the Col de Mente

Stage 17. Orange-Grenoble (La Bastille)

http://tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/110061

All in the name. A garage ramp to rival most garage ramps

http://www.salite.ch/8000/8372.gif


Stage 19. Bourg-en-Bresse-Col de la Savoliere (Col de la Ramaz-Le Praz-de-Lys)

http://tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/110056

The other side of Ramaz with the last 4km at 10%

http://cyclingcols.com/profiles/RamazE.gif (until Savoliere)

Stage 20. Cluses-La Ruchere

http://www.tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/110001

To my surprise, it’s a finish that has already been used in the Tour. A TT in 1984.

Last climb

http://img.over-blog.com/499x331/0/56/08/97/profil_ruch__re.jpg

Km 1: 10,8%
Km 2: 11,1%
Km 3: 10,3%
Km 4: 9,7%

Esentially, the climb proper to the top is about 5km at 10% average. My version is slightly shorter

Also a couple of rather steep climbs before; Marocaz and the Pas de la Fosse

Overall, it’s surprisingly (for me) lacking the long climbs. But as it’s a parody of the Unipublic routes and there are no Bolas or Cuitus Negrus in France that I am aware of, it’s slightly different.

To make a better “copy”, some cruel and rich ******* needs to pave the road from Fabreges to Col de la Sagette. ;)
 
Jul 2, 2012
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roundabout said:
To make a better “copy”, some cruel and rich ******* needs to pave the road from Fabreges to Col de la Sagette. ;)
Do a Unipublic Giro next, then you can use Scanuppia. :D
 
It is nice to hear of some of these crazy walls that they do have in France (and besides, Mont Cassel is great), however. Gives us some nice new options. And besides... I love L'Aberouat.

I'm just going to finish País Vasco off.

Stage 6: Hondarribia - Hondarribia, 19,6km (ITT)





As per tradition we finish off with a mid-length ITT, which, as you might expect from País Vasco, is technical and twisty, looping around the same town as stage 5 finishes in. This means starting off with a run around the port of Hondarribia, on the Bidasoa estuary, before a small climb taking us up part of the lower slopes of the Jaizkibel. It's then a fairly non-technical descent, although there are many corners as the riders head through the modern part of Hondarribia and past the famous Frontón Jostaldi, before heading south towards Irun for the flat (well, this is the Basque country. Rolling) section of the course, which is the chance for the pure ITT guys to put down some power. The course here takes on the shape of an inverted Y, with the riders doubling back on themselves twice negotiating roundabouts. Once this Y-shape is dispensed with, there comes the main power stretch, a long and fairly straight flat run alongside the facilities of San Sebastián airport, a tiny facility right on the border with France. After that it's simply a matter of replicating the final 2km of yesterday's stage, with the cobbled climb in the old town and the descent back down to finish on the seafront. After the travails of stages 3, 4 and 5, this should be a fitting way to solve any issues and bring the race to an end. The winner will have truly earnt their txapela.

Hondarribia:
 
Netserk's Giro d'Italia

I have created a Giro that starts in Naples and ends 3596 km later in Milan. It covers all of Italy but the north-west (and the whole course is within Italy).

There have been a lot of inspiration from the '10 and '11 Giros. (Disclaimer!)

There will be 4 ITT (135 km), and no TTT. The ITT will be: An opening 9 km ITT, short climb but mostly flat 53 km ITT, 28 km MTT and finally a completely flat 45 km ITT.

There will be 5 MTF: Stage 7, 9, 15, 17 and 20.

This year's Cima Coppi will be Gavia from south (Stage 17).

Two stages will be longer than 240 km: Stage 2 and 10.

Just like in '11 the last flat stage will be stage 12.

All Weekend stages will (most probably) have GC action.

The two rest days will be on the last two Mondays.

Saturday, stage 1: Naples – Naples (ITT), 9 km
Sunday, stage 2: Cassino – Chieti, 255 km
Monday, stage 3: Chieti – Chieti, 210 km
Tuesday, stage 4: Ortona – Foggia, 185 km
Wednesday, stage 5: Foggia – Taranto, 237 km
Thursday, stage 6: Policoro – Quattromiglia, 176
Friday, stage 7: Nicastro-sambiase – Gambarie (MTF), 160 km
Saturday, stage 8: Messina – Messina (ITT), 53 km
Sunday, stage 9: Messina – Etna (MTF), 190 km
- REST DAY (Rome) -
Tuesday, stage 10: Viterbo – Montalcino, 257 km
Wednesday, stage 11: Florence – Padua, 223 km
Thursday, stage 12: Venice – Udine, 117 km
Friday, stage 13: Tualis – Ravascletto (MTT), 28 km
Saturday, stage 14: Tolmezzo – Belluno, 194 km
Sunday, stage 15: Belluno – Pordoi (MTF), 225 km
- REST DAY (Trento) -
Tuesday, stage 16: Trento – Bassano del Grappa, 190 km
Wednesday, stage 17: Rovereto – Bormio 2000 (MTF), 215 km
Thursday, stage 18: Bormio – Lovere, 211 km
Friday, stage 19: Alzano Lombardo – Bovegno, 192 km
Saturday, stage 20: Bergamo – Aprica (MTF), 221 km
Sunday, stage 21: Milan – Milan (ITT), 45 km

All the stages will be linked to this post :)
 
Jun 28, 2012
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Working on a Giro d'Italia of my own...

Prologue: Reggio Calabria ITT, 3.9 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738222

Stage 1: Melito di Porto Salvo to Cittanova, 216.5 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738218

Whoever it is that is trying to fight against frontloading, THIS will do it. 10,786 meters of climbing on the opening road stage of the Giro within Aspromonte National Park. I can't get ridewithgps to declare any of these as climbs, but it's fairly obvious to anybody that many of the sprinters may well be HD on Stage 1, if their teams are stupid enough to enroll them in this tour. Amazing that you can find difficult climbs away from the Dolomites within Italy...and some of these climbs have TERRIBLE ramps of 30-35%.

Stage 2: Cittanova to Serra san Bruno, 205.9 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738237

Another stage with nearly 10,000 meters of climbing (ignore that climb around 75 km, however, as that's inside a tunnel). Still about 9,600 meters of climbing, however, and still with quite a few ramps in the 25-30%+ range. Day 2 of Aspromonte National Park will make plenty of riders glad that this is the final day there.

Stage 3: Catanzaro to Azienda Forestale, 218.1 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738267

A kindler, gentler mountain stage, with merely 8,348 meters of climbing. The most difficult part of the stage is early, on the entrance to Sila National Park, but it's difficult enough in the final 80k to be selective.

Stage 4: Castrovillari to San Chirico Raparo, 193.1 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738277

"Only" 7,956 meters of climbing, but included in that is the first hilltop finish of the Giro, although it's a bit weak to call this an MTF. Most of the stage is spent in Pollino National Park, before ending at the entrance to the adjacent Ente Parco Nazionale dell'Appennino Lucano - Val d'Agri - Lagonegrese. Perhaps the best thing about Italy is that you can almost follow the dark green National Parks all the way up the ankle of the boot, and find difficult stages one after another without really looking all that hard.

Stage 5: San Chirico Raparo to Pietrapertosa (MTF), 222.5 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738294

Not the direction I had planned on taking this route, but at 8,984 meters of climbing on the stage, and with ramps on the finishing climb of over 30%, this is not a stage for the faint of heart. It's up and down ALL day, and after these first six days, I may want to have armed guards at the race director's suite to make sure nobody tries to fulfill the bounty that a team director or 22 would place on my head!

Stage 6: Sala Consilina to Vallo della Lucania, 196.6 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1740116

Another stage with over 7,500 meters of climbing, this one grading at 7,646 meters. Much of it is early, but there's enough later in the stage to keep things interesting.

Stage 7: Montecorvino Rovella to Mount Vesuvius, 170 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1740139

The "easiest" stage yet, at 6,698 meters of climbing, but that's small consolation for those who actually have to do the climbing, including the finishing climb at Mount Vesuvius.

Stage 8: Pozzuoli to Naples ITT, 56.8 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1740173

A long time trial, but even this is not exempt from climbing, with the first half being up-and-down the entire way, and the second half having the one "major" climb along the outskirts of Vesuvio National Park. Nonetheless, a much needed rest day awaits.

Stage 9: Montesarchio to Lago del Matese, 218.3 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1741265

Another day with nearly 8,000 meters of climbing following the rest day, including two separate trips through the Parco del Matese. The hardest climb summits nearly 100 km before the finish, at the top of the Bocca della Selva, but overall, another very tough stage.

Stage 10: Abbateggio to Passo Lanciano MTT, 16.6 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1744753

Another very difficult day, although at least this one is short, but against the clock. 1,364 meters of climbing in just 16.6 km is not very easy, of course.
 
SetonHallPirate said:
Working on a Giro d'Italia of my own...

Prologue: Reggio Calabria ITT, 3.9 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738222

Stage 1: Melito di Porto Salvo to Cittanova, 216.5 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738218

Whoever it is that is trying to fight against frontloading, THIS will do it. 10,786 meters of climbing on the opening road stage of the Giro within Aspromonte National Park. I can't get ridewithgps to declare any of these as climbs, but it's fairly obvious to anybody that many of the sprinters may well be HD on Stage 1, if their teams are stupid enough to enroll them in this tour. Amazing that you can find difficult climbs away from the Dolomites within Italy...and some of these climbs have TERRIBLE ramps of 30-35%.

Stage 2: Cittanova to Serra san Bruno, 205.9 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738237

Another stage with nearly 10,000 meters of climbing (ignore that climb around 75 km, however, as that's inside a tunnel). Still about 9,600 meters of climbing, however, and still with quite a few ramps in the 25-30%+ range. Day 2 of Aspromonte National Park will make plenty of riders glad that this is the final day there.

Stage 3: Catanzaro to Azienda Forestale, 218.1 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738267

A kindler, gentler mountain stage, with merely 8,348 meters of climbing. The most difficult part of the stage is early, on the entrance to Sila National Park, but it's difficult enough in the final 80k to be selective.

Stage 4: Castrovillari to San Chirico Raparo, 193.1 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738277

"Only" 7,956 meters of climbing, but included in that is the first hilltop finish of the Giro, although it's a bit weak to call this an MTF. Most of the stage is spent in Pollino National Park, before ending at the entrance to the adjacent Ente Parco Nazionale dell'Appennino Lucano - Val d'Agri - Lagonegrese. Perhaps the best thing about Italy is that you can almost follow the dark green National Parks all the way up the ankle of the boot, and find difficult stages one after another without really looking all that hard.

Stage 5: San Chirico Raparo to Pietrapertosa (MTF), 222.5 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738294

Not the direction I had planned on taking this route, but at 8,984 meters of climbing on the stage, and with ramps on the finishing climb of over 30%, this is not a stage for the faint of heart. It's up and down ALL day, and after these first six days, I may want to have armed guards at the race director's suite to make sure nobody tries to fulfill the bounty that a team director or 22 would place on my head!

The Giro is not taking a rest day, however, I'm taking some time off to glare at the inside of my eyelids.
That's not cycling, that's sadism:eek:
 
rghysens said:
Ridewithgps usually exaggerates the elevation gain by more than 100%, though. But 4000-5000 vertical meters in opening stages is quite unheard of.
Yep, and the gradients of those profiles are just exaggerated by the program he used. Still it would be insanely hard.

It would be like: "Hi I'm Vincenzo Nibali, and this is Jackass" before racing the whole Giro:D
 
Dec 16, 2011
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Have been talking about it already a few months ago, but finally here is my version of la Vuelta a Espana. To my surprise while making this race, I found out that Spain has a lot more climbs as I expected. I really have skipped some good multiple mountain stages to make the course somewhat balanced.

This Vuelta shows how I like to see a bike race; stages suited to sprinters, puncheurs, climbers, descenders and time triallers. Thereby making it a course that should encourage large attacks. Besides, the route always visits quite populated area's, so you won't see sad atmospheres like last years Manzaneda stage.

But enough talk, lets start with:

Prologue: Toledo (4,8 KM ITT)

Is there a better way to start a Grand Tour as in the historic center of a UNESCO city? This short time trial will start in front of the famous Alcazar de Toledo, and bring the riders through the Puente de Alcantara and the Castle of San Servando before finishing in front of the Puerta de Bisagra. It's heavily recommended to go through this route in street view, because it is really nice. The riders will probably disagree: they will hate all the corners and the constant up and downs.:cool:

 
Dec 16, 2011
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Yeah, you've been very fanatic designing some good Vuelta's.

Stage 1: Toledo - Ciudad Real

The first road stage brings the peloton to the South. The stage is short and quite flat, so definetely it will become a bunch sprint. But as I stated, the sprinters deserve their chances as well. Luckily the next days will become somehat more interesting.

 
Dec 16, 2011
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Stage 2: Puertollano - Córdoba (198 KM)

In the Vuelta history, the Córdoba stage is mostly highlighted by the climb to San Jeromino. But in 2011 the organizers decided to spice things up by replacing this climb with tha Alto 14 por ciento. Since this was a great stage you propably expect me to include this climb again. Still, I have chosen for the easy San Jeromino. And even - some of you might stop reading now- I've decided to skip the last part of the climb. Thereby making it only 4 KM at 7%. Ideal to create a nice battle between the sprinters and the puncheurs, since the finish is only 12 KM away. What type of rider will celebrate victory in front of the famous Mezquita Mosque?

 
Dec 16, 2011
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Stage 3: Córdoba - Parador de Jaén (170 KM)

Slowly but steadily things become more interesting this Vuelta. Today's menu contains some nice medium mountains and a Purito-finish! The first two mountains (The Alto Valdepenas and the Puerto Viejo) are quite easy, but that is not the case for the third one! The Camino de las Carnes is a small and straight road that rises from 700 to 1000 metres within 3 kilometres!

After tackling this sharp climb, only 20 kilometres separates the peloton from the finish line at the Parador de Jaén. The first 17 of these are easy, but then it's climbing time again! After 3 KM at 7% the finish line will be inside the castle overlooking the city. Since the climb consists some very steep sections, spectacle will be guaranteed!

 

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