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Race Design Thread

Page 70 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.
[Stages 1 - 5]

[Stages 6 - 10]

[Stages 11 - 15]

[Stages 16 - 18]

Apologies for not finishing this off earlier. I actually couldn't decide what to do with this stage, designers block as such. Coming back to it, I had it sorted in half a minute, and is now my favourite stage of the race.

Tour de France Stage 19: Grenoble - Barrage de Roselend 157km



94km Col des Cyclotouristes 12.8km @ 7.7%
123km Bisanne 12.4km @ 8.2%
153km Col du Pre 12.2km @ 7.9%

Tour de France Stage 20: Bourg-Saint-Maurice - Briancon 223km



48km Col de Iseran 48km @ 4.1%
88km Mont Cenis 9.8km @ 6.9%
137km Colle delle Finestre 18.6km @ 9.1%
165km Colle del Sestriere 15km @ 4.5%
187km Passo del Monginevro 8.3km @ 6.0%
213km Col de Granon 15.3km @ 6.6%

Doesn't look the prettiest, but takes the cake for difficulty.

Tour de France Stage 21: Briancon - Alpe d'Huez 79km



28km Col du Lautaret 27.8km @ 3.1%
79km Alpe d'Huez 14.2km @ 7.7%

Token ASO finish, the only place outside Paris where they would consider finishing in the near future. I'm only doing it as I was worried about transfers, it is possible to finish in Paris but I'd have to take a couple flat stages out of the middle and drop them at the end, meaning longer transfers throughout the race. As it stands almost all the transfers are very small, just the big one on Rest Day 1. Also just noticed it is 3540km all up, so would need to find 40km in the flat stages along the way, nothing serious.
 
[Stages 1 - 5]

[Stages 6 - 10]

[Stages 11 - 15]

[Stages 16 - 18]

[Stages 19 - 21]


Tour de France

Stage 1: Nice 13.3km ITT
Stage 2: Nice - Embrun 221km Mountain *****
Stage 3: Gap - Chambery 184km Flat
Stage 4: Annecy - Col du Bise 125km Mountain ***
Stage 5: Aigle (SUI) - Montbeliard 210km Flat
Stage 6: Belfort - Grand Ballon 145km Mountain ***
Stage 7: Colmar - Metz 184km Flat
Stage 8: Metz - Charleville-Mezieres 224km Hilly **
Stage 9: Charleville-Mezieres - Paris 235km Flat
Stage 10: Bordeaux 52km Flat ITT
Stage 11: Bordeaux - Mont-de-Marsan 184km Flat
Stage 12: Mont-de-Marsan - Artzamendi 149km Mountain **
Stage 13: Hendaye - Larrau 253km Mountain *****
Stage 14: Pau - Bagneres-du-Luchon 158km Flat
Stage 15: Bagneres-de-Luchon - Foix 227km Mountain *****
Stage 16: Carcassonne - Lodeve 229km Hilly ***
Stage 17: Ales 49.4km Hilly ITT
Stage 18: Avignon - Grenoble 239km Flat
Stage 19: Grenoble - Barrage de Roselend 157km Mountain ****
Stage 20: Bourg-Saint-Maurice - Briancon 223km Mountain *****
Stage 21: Tour de France Stage 21: Briancon - Alpe d'Huez 79km Mountain ***

Summary

3 ITTs (1 short, 1 flat, 1 hilly)
9 Mountain stages (4 MTFs)
2 Intermediate stages
7 Flat stages

At no point is there two consecutive flat stages. The biggest lull is around the first rest day, with 5 stages between two MTFs. In each week there is a >200km Queen (Stage 2, Stage 13/15, Stage 20). So in that sense I'm satisfied that my objectives have been met.

Looking back, I think I'd remove the final day in the Pyrenees. Drop the Alpe stage so you'd have Briancon - Lyon then the Paris finish. That would then be 7 mountain stages, eases the difficulty a bit.
 
Ferminal said:
Token ASO finish, the only place outside Paris where they would consider finishing in the near future. I'm only doing it as I was worried about transfers, it is possible to finish in Paris but I'd have to take a couple flat stages out of the middle and drop them at the end, meaning longer transfers throughout the race. As it stands almost all the transfers are very small, just the big one on Rest Day 1. Also just noticed it is 3540km all up, so would need to find 40km in the flat stages along the way, nothing serious.
The 2010 TdF was 3596 km, so I don't think that's a problem. :)

A nice Tour you have created, but I will wait before making my final judgement, until I have studied it closer.
 
And of course TdF and Paris will always finish in Paris, I don't see them changing that. Nice Tour though!

Vuelta El Salvador U23 Stage 4: San Vincente - El Boqueron



(1) Cat. 2 7.5km, 5.6% San Esteban Catarina
(2) Cat. 3 8.0km, 4,1% RN3E San Miguel Tepezontes
(3) Cat. HC 15.9km, 8.4% El Boqueron

Today is the fourth day of this Vuelta El Salvador U23 and things really begin to heat up, with a massive mountain top finish. The rest of the course is relatively easy, although some climbs shouldn't be underestimated.

We start in San Vincente, the finish of the time trial of yesterday. Almost immediately, the first test follows, the second-hardest climb of the day. Crossing the Pan-American highway, the riders climb towards the village of San Esteban Catarina, which is build on some sort of ridge. The road towards it is steep, averaging above 9% in the steepest kilometer. After passing the village, the climb is not over, but the gradients drop to a very manageable 4 or 5 percent. If a breakaway is to form here, it will consist of good climbers.



After the climb, we follow a provincial road, meandering through the landscape and small villages, such as above San Sebastian. Eventually the route returns to the main road, the Pan-American highway. There is no way to avoid this road for this stretch without making a big detour, but the riders will only use the highway for 7 kilometers. Reaching Cojutepeque, a city that once was the capital of the country, the riders leave the highway and continue southward, towards the hilly middle sector of the race.

Riding along the Lago de Ilopango, slowly climbing towards nearly thousand meters (coming from 400m). The first part of this ascent is a categorized climb, although the average percentage is only 4%. The road follows a former volcano, and aforementioned lake is the crater lake of a long dead fire mountain.



Eventually the road descents towards the current capital, San Salvador. Crossing the largest city of the country, the riders emerge near Apopa, a city north of San Salvador. After another short stretch of 4 kilometers on a main highway, the riders once again turn southwards, for another ascent. This is the final one though, and it is a lot more difficult than anything the riders have faced till now.

With an average of 8.4%, this ascent will be a real test. The road climbs towards the top of the El Boqueron volcano, the volcano dominating the city of San Salvador.



The climb is steep, but steady, the first 6 kilometers are on average all around 9.5%, without much deviations. After that, briefly an easier section follows, before the hardest part of the climb: a section of about 1 kilometer with an average of just under 12%, just after passing the halfway point of this climb. The road then smooths out, until we reach the village of Alvarez, a small village situated at an altitude of nearly 1600 meters. This is one of those villages benefiting from the fertile soil of an old volcano. It could've been an ideal finishing place, but instead the riders will have to turn right, towards the natural park El Boqueron. The road narrows somewhat, but the quality is still excellent, and after a further 2 kilometers of climbing at a steep gradient (9.8% average), the finish line lies just below 1800 meters, virtually the top of the volcano. Anyone who finishes in front here, can call himself a talented climber.
 
Looks like a brutal climb for an U23 race, that.

Stage 5: Zumaia - Hondarribia, 164km





Climbs:
Jaizkibel (cat.1) 8,2km @ 5,4%
Col d'Ibardin (cat.2) 4,5km @ 5,7%
Puerto de Agiña (cat.1) 7,7km @ 6,1%
Alto de Aritxulegi (cat.2) 3,5km @ 5,5%
Alto de Erlaitz (cat.1) 9,2km @ 5,2%

The last road stage of the Vuelta al País Vasco takes in not just País Vasco, but a detour into Navarre and into Iparralde as well, before finishing back by the Bidasoa estuary on the Txingudi bay. The stage starts with some rolling, coastal roads as we head along the Gipuzkoan coast, then following the Oria river through satellite towns of San Sebastián such as Usurbil, Hernani and Errenteria through the first 50km. For the last 114km, however, it's all about the climbs. You'll all be familiar with the first of these, of course - Jaizkibel is the Clasica San Sebastián's trademark climb. Descending from this, we arrive in the day's finishing town of Hondarribia, but there's still plenty on the menu for the day. We head from here into Irun, a border town that gave the world Juan Manuel Garate, before crossing over into French terrain. Some rolling terrain in the hills around Hendaye ensue, before the riders take on the northern face of Ibardin, the opposite side to the one they raced in País Vasco this year (also, without the steep final 700m). This side is slightly tougher than the Navarrese side, but still is not likely to be decisive, with three more climbs to come and the stage barely half done.

After descending into Lesaka, the riders now have the double act of Agiña and Aritxulegi to deal with. As you can see, Agiña is easily the tougher of the two, with some steep sections, but there's no respite in the two climbs, with the riders heading through the tunnel at Aritxulegi before descending away from the Peñas de Aia mountain range down into the strongly nationalistic town of Oiartzun. A similar route took place in 2007, in the stage that finished in Oiartzun, although they placed Jaizkibel after the Agiña/Aritxulegi double. They also did what I am about to do next, which is head to Irun again, and then return to the Peñas de Aia with the difficult climb of the Alto de Erlaitz, also known as Castillo del Inglés. Although 9km in length, the tough part of the climb is only really 4-5km long, mostly averaging around 10% for that part of the climb; most of the rest is false flat, although it ramps up and flattens out very inconsistently; here Juanjo Cobo was able to make good and put a minute into Samuel Sánchez to win the Vuelta outright back in 2007. Then, of course, finishing in Oiartzun, there were just 10km to the line; today there are just over 20. The descent back towards Irun accounts for most of that, though, so it is definitely an option for attacking the legs hurt from the multiple climbs and from the tricky stages to Garai and Zumaia.

After the descent finishes, the riders have the short trip from Irun to Hondarribia, past the diminutive San Sebastián Airport. When they get to Hondarribia, there's just a little surprise in store for them. Hondarribia is one of very few old fortified towns that still stand in the Basque country, and the riders are going to be asked to tackle the - uncategorised - narrow cobbled streets of the town, featuring a quite steep - but only about 3-400m in length - climb. This crests just inside the final kilometre, with the finish on the seafront, with a couple of twists and turns inside the final kilometre, so there are still ways to break the race up right until the end. And if you can't time trial, this is your only hope, so you'd better make the most of it!

Hondarribia:


 
Despite earlier saying that I didn't want to create a GT, I have done anyway.

It started with my Pordoi stage, and from there the rest came along. BUT. I have one problem. I have already designed the last 18 stage, and also quite some more, but I simply can't decide what my 3 opening stages should be like. Or well I do partly, but I have created 6 (+1) stages, from which 1 is certain to be in this Giro.

I will now present the 6 (+1) stages, and the different combination of them, from which you recommend. Of course comments in general is great.

I'll start with the stage that will be certain:

As you can see the final is almost identical with the original Chieti stage in T-A this year, and the final 10 km is 100% identical to the last two times it was raced.

It will either be the second stage or the third stage. Originally I created the course so it would be the third, but I had second thoughts, as I also wants it to be a weekend stage.

There will either be one or two stages before that stage, and I originally designed it, so that this would be the opening ITT:

Picture of a Napoli ITT of 15 km

Followed by this:



But for the Chieti stage to be second stage, only one stage can come before it. That could be either of the former two stages, or it could be one of the following two stages:

Short ITT of 9 km with a hill and a technical descent:


Or a stage road race stage starting close to Napoli, where the last 9 km will be those of the ITT above:

Picture of an opening road race stage of 177 km

As for the third stage if it isn't going to be the Chieti stage, it will either be an ITT of the first 11 km of the 14 km circuit below, or a road race of 13 laps: (The picture is of three laps)


And now for the different combinations:

Number 1:

Saturday: The first ITT (15 km)
Sunday: Napoli - Cassino
Monday: Cassino - Chieti

Number 2:
Saturday: The first ITT (15 km)
Sunday: Napoli road stage
Monday: Cassino - Chieti

Number 3:
Saturday: The first ITT (15 km)
Sunday: Cassino - Chieti
Monday: Chieti road stage

Number 4:
Saturday: Napoli - Cassino
Sunday: Cassino - Chieti
Monday: Chieti ITT (11 km)

Number 5:
Saturday: The second ITT (9 km)
Sunday: Cassino - Chieti
Monday: Chieti road stage

Number 6:
Saturday: Napoli road stage
Sunday: Cassino - Chieti
Monday: Chieti ITT (11 km)

PS: @Libertine: You don't have to link this thread, as I later will make a library thread for my Giro, where this will be linked (-:

EDIT: so far my personal preference is number 5, but only by a bike throw.
 
Jul 2, 2012
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Has to be either three or five : I really like that classics-style road stage.
If you already have plenty of flat ITT in the rest of your race do five; if not I'm recommending three.

PS: I'm currently working on a huge project, that's why I haven't posted in a while. If everything goes right, I'll have it finished in a week or two (it's massive :D)
 
Progsprach said:
Has to be either three or five : I really like that classics-style road stage.
If you already have plenty of flat ITT in the rest of your race do five; if not I'm recommending three.

PS: I'm currently working on a huge project, that's why I haven't posted in a while. If everything goes right, I'll have it finished in a week or two (it's massive :D)
Lets just say that there will be over 100 km of ITT, but mountains enough for Abandy to win the race ;)
 
As promised, a Tour if it was taken over by Unipublic

Parody alert ;)

Rouen Rouen (TTT)
Rouen Dieppe
Dieppe Cassel*
Lille Charleville-Mezieres
Charleville-Mezieres Thionville
Thionville Strasbourg
Strasbourg Gerardmer (La Mauselaine)*
Selestat Planche des Belles Filles*
Belfort Longres*
Dijon Moulins
La Chartre Saint-Armand-Montrond (ITT)
Montlucon Super Besse*
Brive-la-Gaillarde Agen
Mont-de-Marsan Laberouat*
Pau Le Mourtis (Col de Mente)*
Toulouse Montpelier
Orange Grenoble (La Bastille)*
Grenoble Villefranche-sur-Saone
Bourg-en-Bresse Col de la Savoliere (Col de la Ramaz-Le Praz-de-Lys)*
Cluses La Ruchere*
Paris

*uphill finish

ok, not quite Unipublic as I just about managed to fit inside 3500kms

Profiles later
 
Progsprach said:
PS: I'm currently working on a huge project, that's why I haven't posted in a while. If everything goes right, I'll have it finished in a week or two (it's massive :D)
What is it? The silk route by bike? 85 stages between Istanbul and Xi'an, crossing Turkey, Iran, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and China?


btw, I have been thinking about it, but it's too huge. :D
 
I still had to finish my giro. So, here's the third week.

15th stage: Pavia -Vicenza, 227 km

A long, flat stage in the plain of the river Po. Expect one of the few mass sprints of the race.

16th stage: Bassano del Grappa - Alpe di Pampeago, 191km



The first stage in the Dolomites, with five categorised climbs:
Monte Grappa: 17.8km @ 8.5%, hors category
Passo di Gobbera: 3rd category
Passo di Brocon: 1st category
Passo Manghen: hors category
Alpe di Pampeago: 1st category (or hors category??)

17th stage: Bolzano - Bolzano, 46 km



A time trial around Bolzano, on both sides of the Adige river. The first half is pan-flat, the second half hilly.

18th stage: Merano - Aprica, 182km



One but last mountain stage, with the mythical Stelvio, the Mortirolo and the Monte Padrio, all three well-deserved hors category.

19th stage: Edolo - Gerola Alta, 195km

Final mountain stage and final decisive stage of this giro.



This one has five categorised climbs:
Passo del Vivione, 1st category
Passo di Presolana, 2nd category
Colle di Zambla Alta, 2nd category
Passo San Marco, hors category
Gerola Alta, 16.6km @ 5.8%, 1225m, 2nd category

20th stage: Lecco - Milano, 105km

A run-in of 55km and 10 laps of 5km in the historical center of Milano.


So, that's it.
From a hindsight, I would have changed one of the hilltop finishes of the first week into a flat finish to make it a bit easier.
 
Next one is a bit less elaborate: an idea for a Belgian or world chamionship course (only the circuit part of it).
It probably is the hardest piece of cycling belgium has on offer: a lap of 21.1 km around Stavelot which includes the côte de Stockeu (2.3km @ 9.9%), côte de Wanneranval (1.8km @ 9.1%) and Thier de Coo (2.6km @ 8.6%).



Finish can be in front of the abbey.



Maybe the run-in to the circuit can start from Liege, and the time trials can be hold on and around the F1 race circuit of Francorchamps.
 
roundabout said:
Profiles later
Ok, lot of links ahead

Stage 3. Dieppe-Cassel

http://tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/109439

Not sure what happened with the last climb, but it should be this

http://jmpodvin2000.free.fr/denivellephoto/cotenord/salite locali/casselimage/CasselAire.png

Not quite to the top, only til the end of the steep bit. Last 300 meters at 14%

Stage 7. Strasbourg-Gerardmer (La Mauselaine)

tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/109450

Basically a shameless copy of the 2009 Tour de l'Avenir final.

I am assuming that this is the partial profile where the initial steep bit is included

https://sites.google.com/site/velovosgescols/chaume-francis (until km 1.5 or maybe slightly further)

Stage 8. Selestat-Planche des Belles Filles

http://tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/109452

Obviously a familiar finish. Platzerwasel, 2 smaller Ballons and Hundsrück before

Stage 9. Belfort-Longres

http://tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/109454

A bit of a Barcelona-like stage to the fortified city

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Langres

Stage 12. Montlucon-Super Besse

http://tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/110071

The usual finish
Stage 14. Mont-de-Marsan-Laberouat

http://tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/110060

Col de Labays and the finish at the refuge

http://www.altimetrias.net/Francia/Pirineos/Laberouat.gif

Stage 15. Pau-Le Mourtis

http://tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/110058

High mountains with Bales, Portillon and the finish on the difficult side of the Col de Mente

Stage 17. Orange-Grenoble (La Bastille)

http://tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/110061

All in the name. A garage ramp to rival most garage ramps

http://www.salite.ch/8000/8372.gif


Stage 19. Bourg-en-Bresse-Col de la Savoliere (Col de la Ramaz-Le Praz-de-Lys)

http://tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/110056

The other side of Ramaz with the last 4km at 10%

http://cyclingcols.com/profiles/RamazE.gif (until Savoliere)

Stage 20. Cluses-La Ruchere

http://www.tracks4bikers.com/tracks/show/110001

To my surprise, it’s a finish that has already been used in the Tour. A TT in 1984.

Last climb

http://img.over-blog.com/499x331/0/56/08/97/profil_ruch__re.jpg

Km 1: 10,8%
Km 2: 11,1%
Km 3: 10,3%
Km 4: 9,7%

Esentially, the climb proper to the top is about 5km at 10% average. My version is slightly shorter

Also a couple of rather steep climbs before; Marocaz and the Pas de la Fosse

Overall, it’s surprisingly (for me) lacking the long climbs. But as it’s a parody of the Unipublic routes and there are no Bolas or Cuitus Negrus in France that I am aware of, it’s slightly different.

To make a better “copy”, some cruel and rich ******* needs to pave the road from Fabreges to Col de la Sagette. ;)
 
Jul 2, 2012
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roundabout said:
To make a better “copy”, some cruel and rich ******* needs to pave the road from Fabreges to Col de la Sagette. ;)
Do a Unipublic Giro next, then you can use Scanuppia. :D
 
It is nice to hear of some of these crazy walls that they do have in France (and besides, Mont Cassel is great), however. Gives us some nice new options. And besides... I love L'Aberouat.

I'm just going to finish País Vasco off.

Stage 6: Hondarribia - Hondarribia, 19,6km (ITT)





As per tradition we finish off with a mid-length ITT, which, as you might expect from País Vasco, is technical and twisty, looping around the same town as stage 5 finishes in. This means starting off with a run around the port of Hondarribia, on the Bidasoa estuary, before a small climb taking us up part of the lower slopes of the Jaizkibel. It's then a fairly non-technical descent, although there are many corners as the riders head through the modern part of Hondarribia and past the famous Frontón Jostaldi, before heading south towards Irun for the flat (well, this is the Basque country. Rolling) section of the course, which is the chance for the pure ITT guys to put down some power. The course here takes on the shape of an inverted Y, with the riders doubling back on themselves twice negotiating roundabouts. Once this Y-shape is dispensed with, there comes the main power stretch, a long and fairly straight flat run alongside the facilities of San Sebastián airport, a tiny facility right on the border with France. After that it's simply a matter of replicating the final 2km of yesterday's stage, with the cobbled climb in the old town and the descent back down to finish on the seafront. After the travails of stages 3, 4 and 5, this should be a fitting way to solve any issues and bring the race to an end. The winner will have truly earnt their txapela.

Hondarribia:
 
Netserk's Giro d'Italia

I have created a Giro that starts in Naples and ends 3596 km later in Milan. It covers all of Italy but the north-west (and the whole course is within Italy).

There have been a lot of inspiration from the '10 and '11 Giros. (Disclaimer!)

There will be 4 ITT (135 km), and no TTT. The ITT will be: An opening 9 km ITT, short climb but mostly flat 53 km ITT, 28 km MTT and finally a completely flat 45 km ITT.

There will be 5 MTF: Stage 7, 9, 15, 17 and 20.

This year's Cima Coppi will be Gavia from south (Stage 17).

Two stages will be longer than 240 km: Stage 2 and 10.

Just like in '11 the last flat stage will be stage 12.

All Weekend stages will (most probably) have GC action.

The two rest days will be on the last two Mondays.

Saturday, stage 1: Naples – Naples (ITT), 9 km
Sunday, stage 2: Cassino – Chieti, 255 km
Monday, stage 3: Chieti – Chieti, 210 km
Tuesday, stage 4: Ortona – Foggia, 185 km
Wednesday, stage 5: Foggia – Taranto, 237 km
Thursday, stage 6: Policoro – Quattromiglia, 176
Friday, stage 7: Nicastro-sambiase – Gambarie (MTF), 160 km
Saturday, stage 8: Messina – Messina (ITT), 53 km
Sunday, stage 9: Messina – Etna (MTF), 190 km
- REST DAY (Rome) -
Tuesday, stage 10: Viterbo – Montalcino, 257 km
Wednesday, stage 11: Florence – Padua, 223 km
Thursday, stage 12: Venice – Udine, 117 km
Friday, stage 13: Tualis – Ravascletto (MTT), 28 km
Saturday, stage 14: Tolmezzo – Belluno, 194 km
Sunday, stage 15: Belluno – Pordoi (MTF), 225 km
- REST DAY (Trento) -
Tuesday, stage 16: Trento – Bassano del Grappa, 190 km
Wednesday, stage 17: Rovereto – Bormio 2000 (MTF), 215 km
Thursday, stage 18: Bormio – Lovere, 211 km
Friday, stage 19: Alzano Lombardo – Bovegno, 192 km
Saturday, stage 20: Bergamo – Aprica (MTF), 221 km
Sunday, stage 21: Milan – Milan (ITT), 45 km

All the stages will be linked to this post :)
 
Jun 28, 2012
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Working on a Giro d'Italia of my own...

Prologue: Reggio Calabria ITT, 3.9 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738222

Stage 1: Melito di Porto Salvo to Cittanova, 216.5 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738218

Whoever it is that is trying to fight against frontloading, THIS will do it. 10,786 meters of climbing on the opening road stage of the Giro within Aspromonte National Park. I can't get ridewithgps to declare any of these as climbs, but it's fairly obvious to anybody that many of the sprinters may well be HD on Stage 1, if their teams are stupid enough to enroll them in this tour. Amazing that you can find difficult climbs away from the Dolomites within Italy...and some of these climbs have TERRIBLE ramps of 30-35%.

Stage 2: Cittanova to Serra san Bruno, 205.9 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738237

Another stage with nearly 10,000 meters of climbing (ignore that climb around 75 km, however, as that's inside a tunnel). Still about 9,600 meters of climbing, however, and still with quite a few ramps in the 25-30%+ range. Day 2 of Aspromonte National Park will make plenty of riders glad that this is the final day there.

Stage 3: Catanzaro to Azienda Forestale, 218.1 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738267

A kindler, gentler mountain stage, with merely 8,348 meters of climbing. The most difficult part of the stage is early, on the entrance to Sila National Park, but it's difficult enough in the final 80k to be selective.

Stage 4: Castrovillari to San Chirico Raparo, 193.1 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738277

"Only" 7,956 meters of climbing, but included in that is the first hilltop finish of the Giro, although it's a bit weak to call this an MTF. Most of the stage is spent in Pollino National Park, before ending at the entrance to the adjacent Ente Parco Nazionale dell'Appennino Lucano - Val d'Agri - Lagonegrese. Perhaps the best thing about Italy is that you can almost follow the dark green National Parks all the way up the ankle of the boot, and find difficult stages one after another without really looking all that hard.

Stage 5: San Chirico Raparo to Pietrapertosa (MTF), 222.5 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738294

Not the direction I had planned on taking this route, but at 8,984 meters of climbing on the stage, and with ramps on the finishing climb of over 30%, this is not a stage for the faint of heart. It's up and down ALL day, and after these first six days, I may want to have armed guards at the race director's suite to make sure nobody tries to fulfill the bounty that a team director or 22 would place on my head!

Stage 6: Sala Consilina to Vallo della Lucania, 196.6 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1740116

Another stage with over 7,500 meters of climbing, this one grading at 7,646 meters. Much of it is early, but there's enough later in the stage to keep things interesting.

Stage 7: Montecorvino Rovella to Mount Vesuvius, 170 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1740139

The "easiest" stage yet, at 6,698 meters of climbing, but that's small consolation for those who actually have to do the climbing, including the finishing climb at Mount Vesuvius.

Stage 8: Pozzuoli to Naples ITT, 56.8 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1740173

A long time trial, but even this is not exempt from climbing, with the first half being up-and-down the entire way, and the second half having the one "major" climb along the outskirts of Vesuvio National Park. Nonetheless, a much needed rest day awaits.

Stage 9: Montesarchio to Lago del Matese, 218.3 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1741265

Another day with nearly 8,000 meters of climbing following the rest day, including two separate trips through the Parco del Matese. The hardest climb summits nearly 100 km before the finish, at the top of the Bocca della Selva, but overall, another very tough stage.

Stage 10: Abbateggio to Passo Lanciano MTT, 16.6 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1744753

Another very difficult day, although at least this one is short, but against the clock. 1,364 meters of climbing in just 16.6 km is not very easy, of course.
 
SetonHallPirate said:
Working on a Giro d'Italia of my own...

Prologue: Reggio Calabria ITT, 3.9 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738222

Stage 1: Melito di Porto Salvo to Cittanova, 216.5 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738218

Whoever it is that is trying to fight against frontloading, THIS will do it. 10,786 meters of climbing on the opening road stage of the Giro within Aspromonte National Park. I can't get ridewithgps to declare any of these as climbs, but it's fairly obvious to anybody that many of the sprinters may well be HD on Stage 1, if their teams are stupid enough to enroll them in this tour. Amazing that you can find difficult climbs away from the Dolomites within Italy...and some of these climbs have TERRIBLE ramps of 30-35%.

Stage 2: Cittanova to Serra san Bruno, 205.9 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738237

Another stage with nearly 10,000 meters of climbing (ignore that climb around 75 km, however, as that's inside a tunnel). Still about 9,600 meters of climbing, however, and still with quite a few ramps in the 25-30%+ range. Day 2 of Aspromonte National Park will make plenty of riders glad that this is the final day there.

Stage 3: Catanzaro to Azienda Forestale, 218.1 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738267

A kindler, gentler mountain stage, with merely 8,348 meters of climbing. The most difficult part of the stage is early, on the entrance to Sila National Park, but it's difficult enough in the final 80k to be selective.

Stage 4: Castrovillari to San Chirico Raparo, 193.1 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738277

"Only" 7,956 meters of climbing, but included in that is the first hilltop finish of the Giro, although it's a bit weak to call this an MTF. Most of the stage is spent in Pollino National Park, before ending at the entrance to the adjacent Ente Parco Nazionale dell'Appennino Lucano - Val d'Agri - Lagonegrese. Perhaps the best thing about Italy is that you can almost follow the dark green National Parks all the way up the ankle of the boot, and find difficult stages one after another without really looking all that hard.

Stage 5: San Chirico Raparo to Pietrapertosa (MTF), 222.5 km

http://ridewithgps.com/routes/1738294

Not the direction I had planned on taking this route, but at 8,984 meters of climbing on the stage, and with ramps on the finishing climb of over 30%, this is not a stage for the faint of heart. It's up and down ALL day, and after these first six days, I may want to have armed guards at the race director's suite to make sure nobody tries to fulfill the bounty that a team director or 22 would place on my head!

The Giro is not taking a rest day, however, I'm taking some time off to glare at the inside of my eyelids.
That's not cycling, that's sadism:eek:
 
rghysens said:
Ridewithgps usually exaggerates the elevation gain by more than 100%, though. But 4000-5000 vertical meters in opening stages is quite unheard of.
Yep, and the gradients of those profiles are just exaggerated by the program he used. Still it would be insanely hard.

It would be like: "Hi I'm Vincenzo Nibali, and this is Jackass" before racing the whole Giro:D
 

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