Random Questions

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Feb 25, 2010
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The Hitch said:
Heres a random question.
why do cyclists go faster in difficult long hilly time trials than in short flat prologues.

In the 2009 51 km hilly world tt in mendrisio, which included a hard climb that had to be done thrice, cancellaras average was above 50km/h.
In the 2010 giro flat 8 km amstertham tt wiggnis came first in something like 47km/h.

My guess is the Amstertham tt had more corners, and they might have been saving themselves for the giro. but wiggins was going specifically for the tt, and surely the corners cant take as much out of cyclists as swiss hills.
on this, If you get these long broad roads you can keep going superfast. on the other hand, cornering and increasing speed again is more tiring than keeping a top speed.
 
Apr 28, 2010
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Fester said:
Interesting debate here. I think clothing colour probably accounts for an extremely marginal gain. However:

I would still back white, due to the skin tight nature of cycle clothing.
Me too. Go to the middle eastern desert and wander down Durka Durka street - they know about heat and they all wear white/light shades.
 
Apr 28, 2010
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Michielveedeebee said:
Random question: how many frames has cancellara already tore to pieces?
52. It was 7, but Andy broke his favorite cabbage patch doll at the post-presentation party. FC went crazy and tore the entire stock of treks apart in a fit of rage.
 
Jun 15, 2010
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The Hitch said:
When Rasmussen won it, they weighed him and found out the equivalent of his body weiight in chocolates was nothing.

It hasnt been used since.
I think the winner of the coeur de lion combativity award gets their own weight in cheese.If Rasmussen were to win.that would be approximately equal to one triangle.
 
Jul 20, 2009
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Michielveedeebee said:
on this, If you get these long broad roads you can keep going superfast. on the other hand, cornering and increasing speed again is more tiring than keeping a top speed.
Also, remember that the riders are starting standing still. The acceleration from 0 to cruising speed accounts for a larger percentage of the overall time of a prologue than of a long time trial.
 
Decided to dig this up again after something my mother and I discussed after today's stage of the Giro.

What if the two riders in the lead of either the KOM Classification or the Point Classification have exactly the same number of points? What determines who actually leads the competition?

I hope that made sense...
 
It should probably be in the rules of the race/UCI.

Hang on...

General INDIVIDUAL CLASSIFICATION BY POINTS: in the event of a tie, the discriminating criteria shall be made by the number of stage victories. If there is still a draw, reference shall be made by the number of victories in intermediate sprints. If there is a further draw, reference shall be made to the final classification by time.
General final classification of the GRAN PREMIO DELLA MONTAGNA: in the event of a tie, reference shall be made to the number of first places obtained in the first category GPM. If there is still a draw, reference shall be made to the number of second category GPM victories, and so forth. If there is a further draw, reference shall be made to the final general classification by time.
http://www.gazzetta.it/Speciali/Giroditalia/2011/en/GARIBALDI_REG.INGLESE2011.pdf
 
sadfitty said:
Also, remember that the riders are starting standing still. The acceleration from 0 to cruising speed accounts for a larger percentage of the overall time of a prologue than of a long time trial.
+1.

Plus the amount of corners that the riders have to face in the prologue also. Has similar effect.
 
Jul 16, 2010
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The Hitch said:
Thanks, some very good points there though i dont know if even that would account for such a big gap in speed.

I guess we will se in the tdf how the rotherdam prologue compares to the later one.
I think it was Rik Verbrugghe who did a 60km/h average prologue at the Giro, fastest ever for the Giro
 
Digging this one up again for a random, and very silly, question!

Imagine a rider has gotten away from the peloton at a comfortable distance. He then reaches a KoM sprint, crosses it and, for some odd reason, decides to go back down and cross it again.
Would the rider then, in this rather weird and purely hypothetical situation, get the second batch of points available? :p
 
Mar 10, 2009
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RedheadDane said:
Digging this one up again for a random, and very silly, question!

Imagine a rider has gotten away from the peloton at a comfortable distance. He then reaches a KoM sprint, crosses it and, for some odd reason, decides to go back down and cross it again.
Would the rider then, in this rather weird and purely hypothetical situation, get the second batch of points available? :p
No.
But I'll bite on the underlying supposition. Even if permissible, that rider would have to go back to the start of the climb, not 100m nor 1000m nor even half way.

But if that rider thinks he has time to get back to the bottom of a climb and back to the top before other riders cross the line, why would he not continue onward for stage or GC win? Riding the Col de la Madeleine twice to earn first and second mountain points would be impressive, but not nearly as impressive as the time gap that rider initially had at the foot of the climb (1st time).
 
Oct 30, 2011
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RedheadDane said:
Digging this one up again for a random, and very silly, question!

Imagine a rider has gotten away from the peloton at a comfortable distance. He then reaches a KoM sprint, crosses it and, for some odd reason, decides to go back down and cross it again.
Would the rider then, in this rather weird and purely hypothetical situation, get the second batch of points available? :p
No. If you want to start thinking like that, then the first rider across it should take all the points available, since the first [how ever many places receive points] times the line is crossed would theoretically be the same rider. Sorry I can't give a better answer, but it's the question's fault.
 
Oct 30, 2011
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benpounder said:
No.
But I'll bite on the underlying supposition. Even if permissible, that rider would have to go back to the start of the climb, not 100m nor 1000m nor even half way.

But if that rider thinks he has time to get back to the bottom of a climb and back to the top before other riders cross the line, why would he not continue onward for stage or GC win? Riding the Col de la Madeleine twice to earn first and second mountain points would be impressive, but not nearly as impressive as the time gap that rider initially had at the foot of the climb (1st time).
That's absurd, what possible basis do you have for assuming that these would be the rules?
 
Mar 10, 2009
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Caruut said:
That's absurd, what possible basis do you have for assuming that these would be the rules?
I think you mis-read what I said. Start with "No", and then the "even if permissible" part.
 
Oct 30, 2011
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benpounder said:
I think you mis-read what I said. Start with "No", and then the "even if permissible" part.
You're saying that if they were to allow you to do this then they'd make you do the climb twice?
 
Mar 10, 2009
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Caruut said:
You're saying that if they were to allow you to do this then they'd make you do the climb twice?
Seeing as we are way out in silly-land, as RedHeadDane admitted, yes. If it were allowed, which it is not.

FWIW, I've re-evaluated (and since were are in silly), given that both sprint and KoM lines are ultimately arbitrary (most KoMs are within reason - but I've seen some that stretch credulity), in order to earn more than one placing, a rider would have to cross the line once, then ride back to the start of the race, turn around, and race to that same arbitrary line a second time to earn dual sprint/KoM points.
:)
:D
:rolleyes:
 
Apr 8, 2010
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El Pistolero said:
Why are you linking to the video that was in the post I responded to:confused:

Anyway, it seems that Boardman used a Rainbow jersey for tt'ing. Indurain didn't (at least in the first tt of the 96 tour). Zülle used some standard once suit but with broad bands around the arms.

Museeuw and Olano both used Rainbow jerseys in tt's when they were road race-champions.

Zabel used a german champion skinsuit in the tt's in the '03 TdF even though he was (only) road race-champion.

I wonder when things got sorted out.
 
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