• The Cycling News forum is looking to add some volunteer moderators with Red Rick's recent retirement. If you're interested in helping keep our discussions on track, send a direct message to @SHaines here on the forum, or use the Contact Us form to message the Community Team.

    In the meanwhile, please use the Report option if you see a post that doesn't fit within the forum rules.

    Thanks!

Rasmussen Basso Vino Ricco Landis Hamilton

Page 2 - Get up to date with the latest news, scores & standings from the Cycling News Community.

should these riders be welcomed back

  • yes but have to ride clean

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0
Jul 24, 2009
351
0
0
Visit site
I'm not about to moralize about doping. Seems unfair to ban them for life when what they did is just par for the course. I have never been on a road bike, but I imagine if I was a professional cyclist I wouldn't be strong enough to say no.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Mellow Velo said:
Everybody seems to hate Ricco and would happily slap him with a life ban.

Why? He's only arrogant, self-centred, egotisical, prone to shooting his mouth off, at every opportunity, trashing his opponents and team mates, alike, rode in yellow........
......oh wait a minute.......Yeah, give the guy a lifetime ban!;)

:D:D Hopefully RadioShack will sign Ricco when he comes back. It would be nearly perfect.
 
Mar 13, 2009
16,854
1
0
Visit site
PACONi said:
Not so. Cycling is soooo much better off without Hamilton.
why is it better with Armstrong and without Hamilton? On account of an assay in a MSGC test? Come on, move past the actual test. The reality is, they are all doing it.

How despicable was Landis and Hamilton's legal defense funds, versus Armstrong's lying being the basis of great wealth?
 
Mar 10, 2009
221
0
0
Visit site
I like Ricco and Rasmussen. Wouldn't mind sitting around and smoking a bowl with those cats. Be good to talk with Rasmussen about whipping Contador and Leipheimer in 07. Seems like all the cool riders get busted. Maybe they won't snatch Contador for a while?
 
Apr 21, 2009
189
0
0
Visit site
Rules

pedaling squares said:
...but until he fails a test or is otherwise proven to be cheating, of course he should be welcomed. ... Basso served his time, so welcome back Ivan. Landis too. Sure Basso insulted our intelligence, and Floyd grabbed on to every thin branch he could reach, but the bottom line is - they did their time. I don't like having dopers in the peloton, but as I wrote before there is no point in having a suspension if you aren't going to allow them back.

I agree. Most posters on this thread seem to favor arbitrarily banning/not banning riders based on their opinions/biases. But there are rules and procedures (which are not perfect). Decisions need to be based on the rules, which are designed to protect the rights of the riders as well as ban/punish convicted cheaters. Efforts for change should be focused on improving the rules / procedures and how well they are administered, rather than arbitrarily punishing riders based on whether you "like" them or not.
 
Jul 9, 2009
104
0
0
Visit site
Jonathan said:
Ofcourse there is one answer. Once their suspension ends, they can race. And if they don't test positive, their results are fine. There is no way to guarantee that they are riding clean, so the second option is the only realistic answer.

+1 Absolutely! The poll's options are really a little crazy. A suspension is just that; just like a prison sentence: once over, the person is free and no further sanctions should be imposed.

And can anybody honestly tell me here that they did not enjoy the battle between Bertie and the Chicken in '07?
 
Apparently, Pat McQuaid is getting very steamed up with the Kazakh's, for picking Andrey Kashesckin for their World's team.
However, he seems happy enough for Vino to ride, even though their bans ended within a couple of weeks of eachother.
Same goes for Valverde, who can't even lodge with his team, as they are based in....erm....Como.
 
Mar 18, 2009
4,186
0
0
Visit site
Mellow Velo said:
Apparently, Pat McQuaid is getting very steamed up with the Kazakh's, for picking Andrey Kashesckin for their World's team.
However, he seems happy enough for Vino to rid

On a related note:

Witnesses surfaced this week of Vinokourov meeting with Michele Ferrari in a secluded location in the swiss mountains shortly before the Vuelta.

Still up to his old habits, apparently.
 
Mar 13, 2009
16,854
1
0
Visit site
did Vino lose a bundle in a development in either Switzerland or Italy. I think he had a sports centre, Lemond style, somewhere in Europe, may have been crushed by the credit crisis, and asset value dropping. My associate in Cannes told me about it a a while back.
 
issoisso said:
On a related note:

Witnesses surfaced this week of Vinokourov meeting with Michele Ferrari in a secluded location in the swiss mountains shortly before the Vuelta.

Still up to his old habits, apparently.
Can't find a source for that, but this is from a couple of years ago:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/other_sports/cycling/6260532.stm


Vinokourov defends Ferrari link

The talented Vinokourov's best Tour finish came in 2003
Tour de France favourite Alexander Vinokourov insists he has nothing to hide about his relationship with trainer Dr Michele Ferrari.
Vinokourov has been training with the Italian, who has been linked with drugs allegations but had a suspended prison sentence reversed.

"Ferrari has never offered me any medicine. He is only in charge of my physical preparation," the Kazakh said.

"I know the way he works and I know I have nothing to be ashamed of."

Vinokourov is considered one of the leading lights for this year's race, which starts with the opening time trial in London on Saturday.

His best finish in Le Tour was third overall in 2003 but several leading names from the last few years, including last year's winner Floyd Landis, are absent because of drug allegations.

Vinokourov, who also came fifth in 2005, was one of last year's favourites but Astana had to withdraw after several of the team were implicated in the Operation Puerto doping scandal.

"Vino", who two months later won the Tour of Spain, was not involved himself but was left without enough team-mates to compete.

Ferrari has worked in the past with seven-times Tour winner Lance Armstrong - who defended the relationship in similar fashion - and Vinokourov's manager Tony Rominger.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Sheltowee said:
I like Ricco and Rasmussen. Wouldn't mind sitting around and smoking a bowl with those cats. QUOTE]

They probably don't smoke. That could lead to all kinds of problems later on...
 

TRENDING THREADS